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This is a distribution of NASM, the Netwide Assembler. NASM is a
prototype general-purpose x86 assembler. It will currently output
flat-form binary files, a.out, COFF and ELF Unix object files,
Microsoft 16-bit DOS and Win32 object files, the as86 object format,
and a home-grown format called RDF.

Also included is NDISASM, a prototype x86 binary-file disassembler
which uses the same instruction table as NASM.

To install NASM, you will need GCC. Type `make', and then when it
has finished copy the file `nasm' (and maybe `ndisasm') to a
directory on your search path (I use /usr/local/bin on my linux
machine at home, and ~/bin on other machines where I don't have root
access). You may also want to copy the man page `nasm.1' (and maybe
`ndisasm.1') to somewhere sensible.

If you want to build a restricted version of NASM containing only
some of the object file formats, you can achieve this by adding
#defines to `outform.h' (see the file itself for documentation), or
equivalently by adding compiler command line options in the
Makefile.

There is a machine description file for the `LCC' retargetable C
compiler, in the directory `lcc', along with instructions for its
use. This means that NASM can now be used as the code-generator back
end for a useful C compiler.

Michael `Wuschel' Tippach has ported his DOS extender `WDOSX' to
enable it to work with the 32-bit binary files NASM can output: the
original extender and his port `WDOSX/N' are available from his web
page, http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Park/4493.

The `misc' directory contains `nasm.sl', a NASM editing mode for the
JED programmers' editor (see http://space.mit.edu/~davis/jed.html
for details about JED). The comment at the start of the file gives
instructions on how to install the mode. This directory also
contains a file (`magic') containing lines to add to /etc/magic on
Unix systems to allow the `file' command to recognise RDF files.

The `rdoff' directory contains sources for a linker and loader for
the RDF object file format, to run under Linux, and also
documentation on the internal structure of RDF files.

For information about how you can distribute and use NASM, see the
file Licence. We were tempted to put NASM under the GPL, but decided
that in many ways it was too restrictive for developers.

For information about how to use NASM, see `nasm.doc'. For
information about how to use NDISASM, see `ndisasm.doc'. For
information about the internal structure of NASM, see
`internals.doc'.

Bug reports (and patches if you can) should be sent to
jules@dcs.warwick.ac.uk or anakin@pobox.com.