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authorOndřej Bílka <neleai@seznam.cz>2014-02-26 23:27:38 +0100
committerOndřej Bílka <neleai@seznam.cz>2014-02-26 23:27:38 +0100
commitcf822e3c94c2cdec736cdf7b503790b17179afcd (patch)
tree732a0fadf101d69c52998e830500ff6f20c96a59 /manual
parent5b456e9d61c5c7a5744e8c9387498017af2c1e7e (diff)
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Fix two spaces after sentence.
Minor formatting fix that was carried by issuing sed -e"s/\. \([A-Z]\)/. \1/" followed by editing result.
Diffstat (limited to 'manual')
-rw-r--r--manual/arith.texi6
-rw-r--r--manual/charset.texi10
-rw-r--r--manual/errno.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/install.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/llio.texi26
-rw-r--r--manual/locale.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/maint.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/math.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/memory.texi6
-rw-r--r--manual/message.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/probes.texi10
-rw-r--r--manual/resource.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/signal.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/socket.texi22
-rw-r--r--manual/stdio.texi4
-rw-r--r--manual/string.texi4
-rw-r--r--manual/time.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/users.texi4
18 files changed, 55 insertions, 55 deletions
diff --git a/manual/arith.texi b/manual/arith.texi
index d1060140ad9..72682f0c996 100644
--- a/manual/arith.texi
+++ b/manual/arith.texi
@@ -1237,7 +1237,7 @@ sqrt (creal (@var{z}) * creal (@var{z}) + cimag (@var{z}) * cimag (@var{z}))
This function should always be used instead of the direct formula
because it takes special care to avoid losing precision. It may also
-take advantage of hardware support for this operation. See @code{hypot}
+take advantage of hardware support for this operation. See @code{hypot}
in @ref{Exponents and Logarithms}.
@end deftypefun
@@ -1369,7 +1369,7 @@ of @w{IEEE 754} conformance.
@pindex math.h
The functions listed here perform operations such as rounding and
-truncation of floating-point values. Some of these functions convert
+truncation of floating-point values. Some of these functions convert
floating point numbers to integer values. They are all declared in
@file{math.h}.
@@ -2625,7 +2625,7 @@ All these functions are defined in @file{stdlib.h}.
@safety{@prelim{}@mtunsafe{@mtasurace{:ecvt}}@asunsafe{}@acsafe{}}
The function @code{ecvt} converts the floating-point number @var{value}
to a string with at most @var{ndigit} decimal digits. The
-returned string contains no decimal point or sign. The first digit of
+returned string contains no decimal point or sign. The first digit of
the string is non-zero (unless @var{value} is actually zero) and the
last digit is rounded to nearest. @code{*@var{decpt}} is set to the
index in the string of the first digit after the decimal point.
diff --git a/manual/charset.texi b/manual/charset.texi
index b2d73abc1ea..68aecd3f1ea 100644
--- a/manual/charset.texi
+++ b/manual/charset.texi
@@ -1709,7 +1709,7 @@ implementation has the possibility to perform such a conversion, the
function returns a handle.
If the wanted conversion is not available, the @code{iconv_open} function
-returns @code{(iconv_t) -1}. In this case the global variable
+returns @code{(iconv_t) -1}. In this case the global variable
@code{errno} can have the following values:
@table @code
@@ -1838,7 +1838,7 @@ implementation chosen for @theglibc{} as it is described below.
Therefore an @code{iconv} call to reset the state should always be
performed if some protocol requires this for the output text.
-The conversion stops for one of three reasons. The first is that all
+The conversion stops for one of three reasons. The first is that all
characters from the input buffer are converted. This actually can mean
two things: either all bytes from the input buffer are consumed or
there are some bytes at the end of the buffer that possibly can form a
@@ -2133,7 +2133,7 @@ will succeed, but how to find @math{@cal{B}}?
Unfortunately, the answer is: there is no general solution. On some
systems guessing might help. On those systems most character sets can
-convert to and from UTF-8 encoded @w{ISO 10646} or Unicode text. Beside
+convert to and from UTF-8 encoded @w{ISO 10646} or Unicode text. Beside
this only some very system-specific methods can help. Since the
conversion functions come from loadable modules and these modules must
be stored somewhere in the filesystem, one @emph{could} try to find them
@@ -2333,7 +2333,7 @@ identical.
So far this section has described how modules are located and considered
to be used. What remains to be described is the interface of the modules
-so that one can write new ones. This section describes the interface as
+so that one can write new ones. This section describes the interface as
it is in use in January 1999. The interface will change a bit in the
future but, with luck, only in an upwardly compatible way.
@@ -2918,7 +2918,7 @@ gconv (struct __gconv_step *step, struct __gconv_step_data *data,
/* @r{Run the conversion loop. @code{status} is set}
@r{appropriately afterwards.} */
- /* @r{If this is the last step, leave the loop. There is}
+ /* @r{If this is the last step, leave the loop. There is}
@r{nothing we can do.} */
if (data->__is_last)
@{
diff --git a/manual/errno.texi b/manual/errno.texi
index 6a691fc9631..41d663978eb 100644
--- a/manual/errno.texi
+++ b/manual/errno.texi
@@ -1317,7 +1317,7 @@ The function @code{strerror} is declared in @file{string.h}.
The @code{strerror_r} function works like @code{strerror} but instead of
returning the error message in a statically allocated buffer shared by
all threads in the process, it returns a private copy for the
-thread. This might be either some permanent global data or a message
+thread. This might be either some permanent global data or a message
string in the user supplied buffer starting at @var{buf} with the
length of @var{n} bytes.
diff --git a/manual/install.texi b/manual/install.texi
index c0b8d9e134f..8562bdc04f2 100644
--- a/manual/install.texi
+++ b/manual/install.texi
@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ the compiler and/or binutils.
If you only specify @samp{--host}, @code{configure} will prepare for a
native compile but use what you specify instead of guessing what your
-system is. This is most useful to change the CPU submodel. For example,
+system is. This is most useful to change the CPU submodel. For example,
if @code{configure} guesses your machine as @code{i686-pc-linux-gnu} but
you want to compile a library for 586es, give
@samp{--host=i586-pc-linux-gnu} or just @samp{--host=i586-linux} and add
diff --git a/manual/llio.texi b/manual/llio.texi
index 69b54c2838c..6f8adfc607d 100644
--- a/manual/llio.texi
+++ b/manual/llio.texi
@@ -1083,7 +1083,7 @@ which describe the location and size of each buffer.
@comment BSD
@deftp {Data Type} {struct iovec}
-The @code{iovec} structure describes a buffer. It contains two fields:
+The @code{iovec} structure describes a buffer. It contains two fields:
@table @code
@@ -1141,8 +1141,8 @@ error. The possible errors are the same as in @code{write}.
@end deftypefun
-@c Note - I haven't read this anywhere. I surmised it from my knowledge
-@c of computer science. Thus, there could be subtleties I'm missing.
+@c Note - I haven't read this anywhere. I surmised it from my knowledge
+@c of computer science. Thus, there could be subtleties I'm missing.
Note that if the buffers are small (under about 1kB), high-level streams
may be easier to use than these functions. However, @code{readv} and
@@ -1195,8 +1195,8 @@ The @code{mmap} function creates a new mapping, connected to bytes
is created, which is not removed by closing the file.
@var{address} gives a preferred starting address for the mapping.
-@code{NULL} expresses no preference. Any previous mapping at that
-address is automatically removed. The address you give may still be
+@code{NULL} expresses no preference. Any previous mapping at that
+address is automatically removed. The address you give may still be
changed, unless you use the @code{MAP_FIXED} flag.
@vindex PROT_READ
@@ -1260,7 +1260,7 @@ as the included @code{malloc} automatically uses @code{mmap} where appropriate.
@c Linux has some other MAP_ options, which I have not discussed here.
@c MAP_DENYWRITE, MAP_EXECUTABLE and MAP_GROWSDOWN don't seem applicable to
-@c user programs (and I don't understand the last two). MAP_LOCKED does
+@c user programs (and I don't understand the last two). MAP_LOCKED does
@c not appear to be implemented.
@end vtable
@@ -1405,14 +1405,14 @@ There is no existing mapping in at least part of the given region.
This function can be used to change the size of an existing memory
area. @var{address} and @var{length} must cover a region entirely mapped
-in the same @code{mmap} statement. A new mapping with the same
+in the same @code{mmap} statement. A new mapping with the same
characteristics will be returned with the length @var{new_length}.
-One option is possible, @code{MREMAP_MAYMOVE}. If it is given in
+One option is possible, @code{MREMAP_MAYMOVE}. If it is given in
@var{flags}, the system may remove the existing mapping and create a new
one of the desired length in another location.
-The address of the resulting mapping is returned, or @math{-1}. Possible
+The address of the resulting mapping is returned, or @math{-1}. Possible
error codes include:
@table @code
@@ -1464,11 +1464,11 @@ The valid BSD values for @var{advice} are:
The region should receive no further special treatment.
@item MADV_RANDOM
-The region will be accessed via random page references. The kernel
+The region will be accessed via random page references. The kernel
should page-in the minimal number of pages for each page fault.
@item MADV_SEQUENTIAL
-The region will be accessed via sequential page references. This
+The region will be accessed via sequential page references. This
may cause the kernel to aggressively read-ahead, expecting further
sequential references after any page fault within this region.
@@ -1540,7 +1540,7 @@ There is no existing mapping in at least part of the given region.
@c close dup @acsfd
This function returns a file descriptor that can be used to allocate shared
-memory via mmap. Unrelated processes can use same @var{name} to create or
+memory via mmap. Unrelated processes can use same @var{name} to create or
open existing shared memory objects.
A @var{name} argument specifies the shared memory object to be opened.
@@ -3899,7 +3899,7 @@ There is no process or process group corresponding to @var{pid}.
@gnusystems{} can handle most input/output operations on many different
devices and objects in terms of a few file primitives - @code{read},
@code{write} and @code{lseek}. However, most devices also have a few
-peculiar operations which do not fit into this model. Such as:
+peculiar operations which do not fit into this model. Such as:
@itemize @bullet
diff --git a/manual/locale.texi b/manual/locale.texi
index 8bfd653edb4..45f1e94c193 100644
--- a/manual/locale.texi
+++ b/manual/locale.texi
@@ -410,7 +410,7 @@ pointer and leaves the current locale unchanged.
@end deftypefun
The path used for finding locale data can be set using the
-@code{LOCPATH} environment variable. The default path for finding
+@code{LOCPATH} environment variable. The default path for finding
locale data is system specific. It is computed from the value given
as the prefix while configuring the C library. This value normally is
@file{/usr} or @file{/}. For the former the complete path is:
diff --git a/manual/maint.texi b/manual/maint.texi
index 659ceae011f..862b49d956d 100644
--- a/manual/maint.texi
+++ b/manual/maint.texi
@@ -424,7 +424,7 @@ top level of the @file{sysdeps} directory tree. For example,
files specific to those machine architectures, but not specific to any
particular operating system. There might be subdirectories for
specializations of those architectures, such as
-@w{@file{sysdeps/m68k/68020}}. Code which is specific to the
+@w{@file{sysdeps/m68k/68020}}. Code which is specific to the
floating-point coprocessor used with a particular machine should go in
@w{@file{sysdeps/@var{machine}/fpu}}.
diff --git a/manual/math.texi b/manual/math.texi
index a884cb7c295..206021c65d6 100644
--- a/manual/math.texi
+++ b/manual/math.texi
@@ -800,7 +800,7 @@ or is very close to 0. It is well-defined for all other values of
@deftypefunx {complex long double} clog10l (complex long double @var{z})
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
These functions return the base 10 logarithm of the complex value
-@var{z}. Mathematically, this corresponds to the value
+@var{z}. Mathematically, this corresponds to the value
@ifnottex
@math{log (z) = log10 (cabs (z)) + I * carg (z)}
diff --git a/manual/memory.texi b/manual/memory.texi
index 4beb322c963..0729e702db5 100644
--- a/manual/memory.texi
+++ b/manual/memory.texi
@@ -1036,7 +1036,7 @@ There was insufficient memory available to satisfy the request.
@end table
-This function was introduced in POSIX 1003.1d. Although this function is
+This function was introduced in POSIX 1003.1d. Although this function is
superseded by @code{aligned_alloc}, it is more portable to older POSIX
systems that do not support @w{ISO C11}.
@end deftypefun
@@ -1361,7 +1361,7 @@ memory consumption of the program.
@defvar __memalign_hook
The value of this variable is a pointer to function that @code{aligned_alloc},
@code{memalign}, @code{posix_memalign} and @code{valloc} use whenever they
-are called. You should define this function to look like @code{aligned_alloc};
+are called. You should define this function to look like @code{aligned_alloc};
that is, like:
@smallexample
@@ -2492,7 +2492,7 @@ add_string (struct obstack *obstack, const char *ptr, int len)
int room = obstack_room (obstack);
if (room == 0)
@{
- /* @r{Not enough room. Add one character slowly,}
+ /* @r{Not enough room. Add one character slowly,}
@r{which may copy to a new chunk and make room.} */
obstack_1grow (obstack, *ptr++);
len--;
diff --git a/manual/message.texi b/manual/message.texi
index 3e324816c6f..b03a14a57a2 100644
--- a/manual/message.texi
+++ b/manual/message.texi
@@ -1584,7 +1584,7 @@ for the @code{iconv_open} function, or a null pointer.
If the @var{codeset} parameter is the null pointer,
@code{bind_textdomain_codeset} returns the currently selected codeset
-for the domain with the name @var{domainname}. It returns @code{NULL} if
+for the domain with the name @var{domainname}. It returns @code{NULL} if
no codeset has yet been selected.
The @code{bind_textdomain_codeset} function can be used several times.
diff --git a/manual/probes.texi b/manual/probes.texi
index b064e338ccc..7dd56d80584 100644
--- a/manual/probes.texi
+++ b/manual/probes.texi
@@ -249,21 +249,21 @@ level of 32 implies 768 bits of precision in the mantissa.
@deftp Probe slowexp_p6 (double @var{$arg1}, double @var{$arg2})
This probe is triggered when the @code{exp} function is called with an
input that results in multiple precision computation with precision
-6. Argument @var{$arg1} is the input value and @var{$arg2} is the
+6. Argument @var{$arg1} is the input value and @var{$arg2} is the
computed output.
@end deftp
@deftp Probe slowexp_p32 (double @var{$arg1}, double @var{$arg2})
This probe is triggered when the @code{exp} function is called with an
input that results in multiple precision computation with precision
-32. Argument @var{$arg1} is the input value and @var{$arg2} is the
+32. Argument @var{$arg1} is the input value and @var{$arg2} is the
computed output.
@end deftp
@deftp Probe slowpow_p10 (double @var{$arg1}, double @var{$arg2}, double @var{$arg3}, double @var{$arg4})
This probe is triggered when the @code{pow} function is called with
inputs that result in multiple precision computation with precision
-10. Arguments @var{$arg1} and @var{$arg2} are the input values,
+10. Arguments @var{$arg1} and @var{$arg2} are the input values,
@code{$arg3} is the value computed in the fast phase of the algorithm
and @code{$arg4} is the final accurate value.
@end deftp
@@ -271,7 +271,7 @@ and @code{$arg4} is the final accurate value.
@deftp Probe slowpow_p32 (double @var{$arg1}, double @var{$arg2}, double @var{$arg3}, double @var{$arg4})
This probe is triggered when the @code{pow} function is called with an
input that results in multiple precision computation with precision
-32. Arguments @var{$arg1} and @var{$arg2} are the input values,
+32. Arguments @var{$arg1} and @var{$arg2} are the input values,
@code{$arg3} is the value computed in the fast phase of the algorithm
and @code{$arg4} is the final accurate value.
@end deftp
@@ -393,7 +393,7 @@ address that will be stored in the @code{jmp_buf}.
@deftp Probe longjmp (void *@var{$arg1}, int @var{$arg2}, void *@var{$arg3})
This probe is triggered whenever @code{longjmp} or @code{siglongjmp}
-is called. Argument @var{$arg1} is a pointer to the @code{jmp_buf}
+is called. Argument @var{$arg1} is a pointer to the @code{jmp_buf}
passed as the first argument of @code{longjmp} or @code{siglongjmp},
@var{$arg2} is the return value passed as the second argument of
@code{longjmp} or @code{siglongjmp} and @var{$arg3} is a pointer to
diff --git a/manual/resource.texi b/manual/resource.texi
index b5f0c24873b..ce481134607 100644
--- a/manual/resource.texi
+++ b/manual/resource.texi
@@ -1723,7 +1723,7 @@ running. This number is average over different periods of times
@c it, closes it, without cancellation point, and calls strtod_l with
@c the C locale to convert the strings to doubles.
This function gets the 1, 5 and 15 minute load averages of the
-system. The values are placed in @var{loadavg}. @code{getloadavg} will
+system. The values are placed in @var{loadavg}. @code{getloadavg} will
place at most @var{nelem} elements into the array but never more than
three elements. The return value is the number of elements written to
@var{loadavg}, or -1 on error.
diff --git a/manual/signal.texi b/manual/signal.texi
index 51f68b5d3ec..ac84c5ec66e 100644
--- a/manual/signal.texi
+++ b/manual/signal.texi
@@ -2615,7 +2615,7 @@ The prototype for the @code{sigprocmask} function is in @file{signal.h}.
Note that you must not use @code{sigprocmask} in multi-threaded processes,
because each thread has its own signal mask and there is no single process
-signal mask. According to POSIX, the behavior of @code{sigprocmask} in a
+signal mask. According to POSIX, the behavior of @code{sigprocmask} in a
multi-threaded process is ``unspecified''.
Instead, use @code{pthread_sigmask}.
@ifset linuxthreads
diff --git a/manual/socket.texi b/manual/socket.texi
index 6ee82010f72..1d9d527488d 100644
--- a/manual/socket.texi
+++ b/manual/socket.texi
@@ -742,7 +742,7 @@ features, and will eventually replace IPv4.
To create a socket in the IPv4 Internet namespace, use the symbolic name
@code{PF_INET} of this namespace as the @var{namespace} argument to
@code{socket} or @code{socketpair}. For IPv6 addresses you need the
-macro @code{PF_INET6}. These macros are defined in @file{sys/socket.h}.
+macro @code{PF_INET6}. These macros are defined in @file{sys/socket.h}.
@pindex sys/socket.h
@comment sys/socket.h
@@ -1110,7 +1110,7 @@ it in the @code{struct in_addr} that @var{addr} points to.
This function converts the IPv4 Internet host address @var{name} from the
standard numbers-and-dots notation into binary data. If the input is
not valid, @code{inet_addr} returns @code{INADDR_NONE}. This is an
-obsolete interface to @code{inet_aton}, described immediately above. It
+obsolete interface to @code{inet_aton}, described immediately above. It
is obsolete because @code{INADDR_NONE} is a valid address
(255.255.255.255), and @code{inet_aton} provides a cleaner way to
indicate error return.
@@ -1126,8 +1126,8 @@ indicate error return.
@c tolower dup @mtslocale
@c isspace dup @mtslocale
This function extracts the network number from the address @var{name},
-given in the standard numbers-and-dots notation. The returned address is
-in host order. If the input is not valid, @code{inet_network} returns
+given in the standard numbers-and-dots notation. The returned address is
+in host order. If the input is not valid, @code{inet_network} returns
@code{-1}.
The function works only with traditional IPv4 class A, B and C network
@@ -1419,7 +1419,7 @@ allows the caller to specify the desired address family (e.g.@:
The @code{gethostbyaddr} function returns information about the host
with Internet address @var{addr}. The parameter @var{addr} is not
really a pointer to char - it can be a pointer to an IPv4 or an IPv6
-address. The @var{length} argument is the size (in bytes) of the address
+address. The @var{length} argument is the size (in bytes) of the address
at @var{addr}. @var{format} specifies the address format; for an IPv4
Internet address, specify a value of @code{AF_INET}; for an IPv6
Internet address, use @code{AF_INET6}.
@@ -1550,15 +1550,15 @@ pointer and the size of the buffer in the @var{buf} and @var{buflen}
parameters.
A pointer to the buffer, in which the result is stored, is available in
-@code{*@var{result}} after the function call successfully returned. The
+@code{*@var{result}} after the function call successfully returned. The
buffer passed as the @var{buf} parameter can be freed only once the caller
has finished with the result hostent struct, or has copied it including all
-the other memory that it points to. If an error occurs or if no entry is
-found, the pointer @code{*@var{result}} is a null pointer. Success is
+the other memory that it points to. If an error occurs or if no entry is
+found, the pointer @code{*@var{result}} is a null pointer. Success is
signalled by a zero return value. If the function failed the return value
is an error number. In addition to the errors defined for
-@code{gethostbyname} it can also be @code{ERANGE}. In this case the call
-should be repeated with a larger buffer. Additional error information is
+@code{gethostbyname} it can also be @code{ERANGE}. In this case the call
+should be repeated with a larger buffer. Additional error information is
not stored in the global variable @code{h_errno} but instead in the object
pointed to by @var{h_errnop}.
@@ -1634,7 +1634,7 @@ allows the caller to specify the desired address family (e.g.@:
The @code{gethostbyaddr_r} function returns information about the host
with Internet address @var{addr}. The parameter @var{addr} is not
really a pointer to char - it can be a pointer to an IPv4 or an IPv6
-address. The @var{length} argument is the size (in bytes) of the address
+address. The @var{length} argument is the size (in bytes) of the address
at @var{addr}. @var{format} specifies the address format; for an IPv4
Internet address, specify a value of @code{AF_INET}; for an IPv6
Internet address, use @code{AF_INET6}.
diff --git a/manual/stdio.texi b/manual/stdio.texi
index 1161a9a90a6..a4364f79f99 100644
--- a/manual/stdio.texi
+++ b/manual/stdio.texi
@@ -541,7 +541,7 @@ another thread.
@deftypefun void funlockfile (FILE *@var{stream})
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acunsafe{@aculock{}}}
The @code{funlockfile} function releases the internal locking object of
-the stream @var{stream}. The stream must have been locked before by a
+the stream @var{stream}. The stream must have been locked before by a
call to @code{flockfile} or a successful call of @code{ftrylockfile}.
The implicit locking performed by the stream operations do not count.
The @code{funlockfile} function does not return an error status and the
@@ -2547,7 +2547,7 @@ address of a @code{char *} object, and a successful call to
location.
The return value is the number of characters allocated for the buffer, or
-less than zero if an error occurred. Usually this means that the buffer
+less than zero if an error occurred. Usually this means that the buffer
could not be allocated.
Here is how to use @code{asprintf} to get the same result as the
diff --git a/manual/string.texi b/manual/string.texi
index 6dcd4aff44a..4437dddd47f 100644
--- a/manual/string.texi
+++ b/manual/string.texi
@@ -1308,7 +1308,7 @@ we find a digit in each string - then we enter a special comparison
mode, where each sequence of digits is taken as a whole. If we reach the
end of these two parts without noticing a difference, we return to the
standard comparison mode. There are two types of numeric parts:
-"integral" and "fractional" (those begin with a '0'). The types
+"integral" and "fractional" (those begin with a '0'). The types
of the numeric parts affect the way we sort them:
@itemize @bullet
@@ -2260,7 +2260,7 @@ on different systems.
@comment XPG
@deftypefun {char *} basename (const char *@var{path})
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@assafe{}@acsafe{}}
-This is the standard XPG defined @code{basename}. It is similar in
+This is the standard XPG defined @code{basename}. It is similar in
spirit to the GNU version, but may modify the @var{path} by removing
trailing '/' characters. If the @var{path} is made up entirely of '/'
characters, then "/" will be returned. Also, if @var{path} is
diff --git a/manual/time.texi b/manual/time.texi
index d46d2c8f4b7..d6085edeaeb 100644
--- a/manual/time.texi
+++ b/manual/time.texi
@@ -1335,7 +1335,7 @@ Ordinary characters appearing in the @var{template} are copied to the
output string @var{s}; this can include multibyte character sequences.
Conversion specifiers are introduced by a @samp{%} character, followed
by an optional flag which can be one of the following. These flags
-are all GNU extensions. The first three affect only the output of
+are all GNU extensions. The first three affect only the output of
numbers:
@table @code
diff --git a/manual/users.texi b/manual/users.texi
index 93b25ebcf46..a14a25664ed 100644
--- a/manual/users.texi
+++ b/manual/users.texi
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ in a data base which you can access as described in @ref{User Database}.
@cindex group ID
Users are classified in @dfn{groups}. Each user name belongs to one
@dfn{default group} and may also belong to any number of
-@dfn{supplementary groups}. Users who are members of the same group can
+@dfn{supplementary groups}. Users who are members of the same group can
share resources (such as files) that are not accessible to users who are
not a member of that group. Each group has a @dfn{group name} and
@dfn{group ID}. @xref{Group Database}, for how to find information
@@ -830,7 +830,7 @@ special user.
Be cautious about using the @code{exec} functions in combination with
changing the effective user ID. Don't let users of your program execute
arbitrary programs under a changed user ID. Executing a shell is
-especially bad news. Less obviously, the @code{execlp} and @code{execvp}
+especially bad news. Less obviously, the @code{execlp} and @code{execvp}
functions are a potential risk (since the program they execute depends
on the user's @code{PATH} environment variable).