aboutsummaryrefslogtreecommitdiffstats
path: root/manual/signal.texi
diff options
context:
space:
mode:
authorUlrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com>1996-12-08 08:01:13 +0000
committerUlrich Drepper <drepper@redhat.com>1996-12-08 08:01:13 +0000
commitf65fd747b440ae2d8a7481ecc50e668c5e4d0cc9 (patch)
treef64c3eeda0e9acc58b96c28ca852a014c822047f /manual/signal.texi
parent42054ddb496798d9b936490cf0050f6619f86bc1 (diff)
downloadtermbaud-f65fd747b440ae2d8a7481ecc50e668c5e4d0cc9.tar.gz
termbaud-f65fd747b440ae2d8a7481ecc50e668c5e4d0cc9.tar.xz
termbaud-f65fd747b440ae2d8a7481ecc50e668c5e4d0cc9.zip
update from main archive 961207cvs/libc-961208
Sun Dec 8 06:56:49 1996 Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com> * io/getwd.c: Use PATH_MAX not LOCAL_PATH_MAX. Fix typo in comment. * stdlib/canonicalize.c: Correct bugs in last change. Patch by HJ Lu. * libio/Makefile (routines): Remove ioprims. (aux): Remove cleanup. Add IO_DEBUG option for .o files. * libio/cleanups.c: Removed. * libio/ioprims.c: Removed. * libio/filedoalloc.c: More updates from libg++-2.8b5. * libio/fileops.c: Likewise. * libio/genops.c: Likewise. * libio/iolibio.h: Likewise. * libio/iopopen.c: Likewise. * libio/iovsprintf.c: Likewise. * libio/iovsscanf.c: Likewise. * libio/libio.h: Likewise. * libio/libioP.h: Likewise. * libio/memstream.c: Likewise. * libio/strfile.h: Likewise. * libio/vasprintf.c: Likewise. * libio/vsnprintf.c: Likewise. * libio/stdio.h: Define P_tmpdir only is __USE_SVID. * manual/arith.texi: Change references to ANSI C to ISO C. * manual/conf.texi: Likewise. * manual/creature.texi: Likewise. * manual/ctype.texi: Likewise. * manual/errno.texi: Likewise. * manual/filesys.texi: Likewise. * manual/intro.texi. Likewise. * manual/io.texi: Likewise. * manual/lang.texi: Likewise. * manual/libc.texinfo: Likewise. * manual/locale.texi: Likewise. * manual/maint.texi: Likewise. * manual/mbyte.texi: Likewise. * manual/memory.texi: Likewise. * manual/process.texi: Likewise. * manual/process.texi: Likewise. * manual/search.texi: Likewise. * manual/setjmp.texi: Likewise. * manual/signal.texi: Likewise. * manual/startup.texi: Likewise. * manual/stdio.texi: Likewise. * manual/string.texi: Likewise. * manual/time.texi: Likewise. * manual/locale.texi: Remove description of LC_RESPONSE and add LC_MESSAGES. * Makefile (subdirs): Change malloc in $(malloc). * config.make.in: Add variable malloc which is initialized from @malloc@. * configure.in: Add new option --enable-new-malloc to use new malloc. This is the default on Linux. * sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/configure.in: Define malloc to new-malloc by default. * new-malloc/Makefile: New file. Improved malloc implementation. * new-malloc/malloc.c: Likewise. * new-malloc/malloc.h: Likewise. * new-malloc/mallocbug.c: Likewise. * new-malloc/obstack.c: Likewise. * new-malloc/obstack.h: Likewise. * new-malloc/thread-m.h: Likewise. * time/Makefile: Compile ap.c with NO_MCHECK flag for now. * time/ap.c: Don't call mcheck if NO_MCHECK is defined. * resolv/Makefile: Add rule to rebuiild libresolv.so when libc.so changed. * stdio/feof.c: Update copyright. * stdio/stdio.h: Add field for lock to FILE structure. Add cast to *MAGIC constants to prevent warnings. * stdio-common/bug7.c: Correct test. Stream must not be closed twice. * stdlib/Makefile (routines): Add secure-getenv. * stdlib/secure-getenv.c: New file. __secure_getenv function moved to here from sysdeps/generic/getenv.c. Otherwise an application cannot replace the getenv function in the libc. * sysdeps/generic/getenv.c: Remove __secure_getenv function. * sysdeps/stub/getenv.c: Remove __secure_getenv alias. * sysdeps/mach/libc-lock.h: Define__libc_mutex_lock to __mutex_lock. * sysdeps/posix/fdopen.c: Update copyright. Don't use EXFUN. * time/test-tz.c: Comment fifth test out. PROBLEM. * time/tzset.c: De-ANSI-declfy. (__tzset): Don't increment pointer tz when no DST information is given. Sat Dec 7 23:47:54 1996 Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com> * sysdeps/mach/libc-lock.h [_LIBC]: Add definition of __libc_mutex_lock. Patch by Thomas Bushnell. * sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/timebits.h: Load <asm/param.h> only if __USE_MISC. * sysdeps/unix/sysv/linux/Dist: Add llseek.c. Sat Dec 7 12:18:56 1996 Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com> * time/strftime (%c format): Remove %Z from default string. Reported by Paul Eggert * io/getwd.c: Don't apply getcwd on user supplied buffer.
Diffstat (limited to 'manual/signal.texi')
-rw-r--r--manual/signal.texi87
1 files changed, 44 insertions, 43 deletions
diff --git a/manual/signal.texi b/manual/signal.texi
index bca02c528bd..088c35d02fc 100644
--- a/manual/signal.texi
+++ b/manual/signal.texi
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ and synchronize.
* Generating Signals:: How to send a signal to a process.
* Blocking Signals:: Making the system hold signals temporarily.
* Waiting for a Signal:: Suspending your program until a signal
- arrives.
+ arrives.
* Signal Stack:: Using a Separate Signal Stack.
* BSD Signal Handling:: Additional functions for backward
compatibility with BSD.
@@ -51,11 +51,11 @@ signals.
* Kinds of Signals:: Some examples of what can cause a signal.
* Signal Generation:: Concepts of why and how signals occur.
* Delivery of Signal:: Concepts of what a signal does to the
- process.
+ process.
@end menu
@node Kinds of Signals
-@subsection Some Kinds of Signals
+@subsection Some Kinds of Signals
A signal reports the occurrence of an exceptional event. These are some
of the events that can cause (or @dfn{generate}, or @dfn{raise}) a
@@ -229,7 +229,7 @@ defined. Since the signal numbers are allocated consecutively,
@menu
* Program Error Signals:: Used to report serious program errors.
* Termination Signals:: Used to interrupt and/or terminate the
- program.
+ program.
* Alarm Signals:: Used to indicate expiration of timers.
* Asynchronous I/O Signals:: Used to indicate input is available.
* Job Control Signals:: Signals used to support job control.
@@ -279,7 +279,7 @@ files is so that you can examine them with a debugger to investigate
what caused the error.
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro int SIGFPE
The @code{SIGFPE} signal reports a fatal arithmetic error. Although the
name is derived from ``floating-point exception'', this signal actually
@@ -294,7 +294,8 @@ floating-point number.
Actual floating-point exceptions are a complicated subject because there
are many types of exceptions with subtly different meanings, and the
@code{SIGFPE} signal doesn't distinguish between them. The @cite{IEEE
-Standard for Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985)}
+Standard for Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985
+and ANSI/IEEE Std 854-1987)}
defines various floating-point exceptions and requires conforming
computer systems to report their occurrences. However, this standard
does not specify how the exceptions are reported, or what kinds of
@@ -368,7 +369,7 @@ Floating underflow fault.
@end table
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro int SIGILL
The name of this signal is derived from ``illegal instruction''; it
usually means your program is trying to execute garbage or a privileged
@@ -387,7 +388,7 @@ the system has trouble running the handler for a signal.
@cindex illegal instruction
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro int SIGSEGV
@cindex segmentation violation
This signal is generated when a program tries to read or write outside
@@ -421,7 +422,7 @@ The name of this signal is an abbreviation for ``bus error''.
@cindex bus error
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro int SIGABRT
@cindex abort signal
This signal indicates an error detected by the program itself and
@@ -480,7 +481,7 @@ The (obvious) default action for all of these signals is to cause the
process to terminate.
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro int SIGTERM
@cindex termination signal
The @code{SIGTERM} signal is a generic signal used to cause program
@@ -493,7 +494,7 @@ The shell command @code{kill} generates @code{SIGTERM} by default.
@end deftypevr
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro int SIGINT
@cindex interrupt signal
The @code{SIGINT} (``program interrupt'') signal is sent when the user
@@ -595,7 +596,7 @@ time used by the current process. The name is an abbreviation for
@comment BSD
@deftypevr Macro int SIGPROF
This signal is typically indicates expiration of a timer that measures
-both CPU time used by the current process, and CPU time expended on
+both CPU time used by the current process, and CPU time expended on
behalf of the process by the system. Such a timer is used to implement
code profiling facilities, hence the name of this signal.
@end deftypevr
@@ -623,7 +624,7 @@ On most operating systems, terminals and sockets are the only kinds of
files that can generate @code{SIGIO}; other kinds, including ordinary
files, never generate @code{SIGIO} even if you ask them to.
-In the GNU system @code{SIGIO} will always be generated properly
+In the GNU system @code{SIGIO} will always be generated properly
if you successfully set asynchronous mode with @code{fcntl}.
@end deftypevr
@@ -703,7 +704,7 @@ ignored, or blocked.
@comment POSIX.1
@deftypevr Macro int SIGTSTP
The @code{SIGTSTP} signal is an interactive stop signal. Unlike
-@code{SIGSTOP}, this signal can be handled and ignored.
+@code{SIGSTOP}, this signal can be handled and ignored.
Your program should handle this signal if you have a special need to
leave files or system tables in a secure state when a process is
@@ -719,7 +720,7 @@ support, see @ref{Special Characters}.
@comment signal.h
@comment POSIX.1
@deftypevr Macro int SIGTTIN
-A process cannot read from the the user's terminal while it is running
+A process cannot read from the the user's terminal while it is running
as a background job. When any process in a background job tries to
read from the terminal, all of the processes in the job are sent a
@code{SIGTTIN} signal. The default action for this signal is to
@@ -906,11 +907,11 @@ This function prints a message describing the signal @var{signum} to the
standard error output stream @code{stderr}; see @ref{Standard Streams}.
If you call @code{psignal} with a @var{message} that is either a null
-pointer or an empty string, @code{psignal} just prints the message
+pointer or an empty string, @code{psignal} just prints the message
corresponding to @var{signum}, adding a trailing newline.
If you supply a non-null @var{message} argument, then @code{psignal}
-prefixes its output with this string. It adds a colon and a space
+prefixes its output with this string. It adds a colon and a space
character to separate the @var{message} from the string corresponding
to @var{signum}.
@@ -969,7 +970,7 @@ The name @code{sighandler_t} for this data type is a GNU extension.
@end deftp
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypefun sighandler_t signal (int @var{signum}, sighandler_t @var{action})
The @code{signal} function establishes @var{action} as the action for
the signal @var{signum}.
@@ -1086,7 +1087,7 @@ provided only for compatibility with SVID.
@end deftypefun
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro sighandler_t SIG_ERR
The value of this macro is used as the return value from @code{signal}
to indicate an error.
@@ -1139,7 +1140,7 @@ handler is started; this is true regardless of the value in
handler, you must write code in the handler to unblock it.
@item int sa_flags
-This specifies various flags which can affect the behavior of
+This specifies various flags which can affect the behavior of
the signal. These are described in more detail in @ref{Flags for Sigaction}.
@end table
@end deftp
@@ -1201,10 +1202,10 @@ you can rely on using it as an argument to @code{sigaction}. This
problem never happens on the GNU system.
So, you're better off using one or the other of the mechanisms
-consistently within a single program.
+consistently within a single program.
@strong{Portability Note:} The basic @code{signal} function is a feature
-of ANSI C, while @code{sigaction} is part of the POSIX.1 standard. If
+of @w{ISO C}, while @code{sigaction} is part of the POSIX.1 standard. If
you are concerned about portability to non-POSIX systems, then you
should use the @code{signal} function instead.
@@ -1267,7 +1268,7 @@ action for @code{SIGINT} without changing that action.
struct sigaction query_action;
if (sigaction (SIGINT, NULL, &query_action) < 0)
- /* @r{@code{sigaction} returns -1 in case of error.} */
+ /* @r{@code{sigaction} returns -1 in case of error.} */
else if (query_action.sa_handler == SIG_DFL)
/* @r{@code{SIGINT} is handled in the default, fatal manner.} */
else if (query_action.sa_handler == SIG_IGN)
@@ -1412,7 +1413,7 @@ describes what your handler should do, and what you should avoid.
@menu
* Handler Returns:: Handlers that return normally, and what
- this means.
+ this means.
* Termination in Handler:: How handler functions terminate a program.
* Longjmp in Handler:: Nonlocal transfer of control out of a
signal handler.
@@ -1421,9 +1422,9 @@ describes what your handler should do, and what you should avoid.
* Merged Signals:: When a second signal arrives before the
first is handled.
* Nonreentrancy:: Do not call any functions unless you know they
- are reentrant with respect to signals.
+ are reentrant with respect to signals.
* Atomic Data Access:: A single handler can run in the middle of
- reading or writing a single object.
+ reading or writing a single object.
@end menu
@node Handler Returns
@@ -1567,7 +1568,7 @@ read_data ()
waiting_for_input = 1;
@dots{}
waiting_for_input = 0;
- @} else @{
+ @} else @{
@dots{}
@}
@}
@@ -1679,7 +1680,7 @@ sigchld_handler (int signo)
struct process *p;
/* @r{Keep asking for a status until we get a definitive result.} */
- do
+ do
@{
errno = 0;
pid = waitpid (WAIT_ANY, &w, WNOHANG | WUNTRACED);
@@ -1777,7 +1778,7 @@ sig_atomic_t last_process_status_change;
@end smallexample
@node Nonreentrancy
-@subsection Signal Handling and Nonreentrant Functions
+@subsection Signal Handling and Nonreentrant Functions
@cindex restrictions on signal handler functions
Handler functions usually don't do very much. The best practice is to
@@ -1994,7 +1995,7 @@ one it is, and how many bits it contains, may vary from machine to
machine.
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftp {Data Type} sig_atomic_t
This is an integer data type. Objects of this type are always accessed
atomically.
@@ -2134,7 +2135,7 @@ function is declared in @file{signal.h}.
@pindex signal.h
@comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
@deftypefun int raise (int @var{signum})
The @code{raise} function sends the signal @var{signum} to the calling
process. It returns zero if successful and a nonzero value if it fails.
@@ -2201,7 +2202,7 @@ main (void)
@end group
@end smallexample
-@strong{Portability note:} @code{raise} was invented by the ANSI C
+@strong{Portability note:} @code{raise} was invented by the @w{ISO C}
committee. Older systems may not support it, so using @code{kill} may
be more portable. @xref{Signaling Another Process}.
@@ -2369,7 +2370,7 @@ them from interrupting sensitive operations. For instance:
@itemize @bullet
@item
You can use the @code{sigprocmask} function to block signals while you
-modify global variables that are also modified by the handlers for these
+modify global variables that are also modified by the handlers for these
signals.
@item
@@ -2381,18 +2382,18 @@ signal handler can run without being interrupted itself by signals.
@menu
* Why Block:: The purpose of blocking signals.
* Signal Sets:: How to specify which signals to
- block.
+ block.
* Process Signal Mask:: Blocking delivery of signals to your
process during normal execution.
* Testing for Delivery:: Blocking to Test for Delivery of
- a Signal.
+ a Signal.
* Blocking for Handler:: Blocking additional signals while a
handler is being run.
* Checking for Pending Signals:: Checking for Pending Signals
* Remembering a Signal:: How you can get almost the same
effect as blocking a signal, by
handling it and setting a flag
- to be tested later.
+ to be tested later.
@end menu
@node Why Block
@@ -2743,7 +2744,7 @@ sigaddset (&base_mask, SIGINT);
sigaddset (&base_mask, SIGTSTP);
/* @r{Block user interrupts while doing other processing.} */
-sigprocmask (SIG_SETMASK, &base_mask, NULL);
+sigprocmask (SIG_SETMASK, &base_mask, NULL);
@dots{}
/* @r{After a while, check to see whether any signals are pending.} */
@@ -2980,7 +2981,7 @@ returns.
The mask remains @var{set} only as long as @code{sigsuspend} is waiting.
The function @code{sigsuspend} always restores the previous signal mask
-when it returns.
+when it returns.
The return value and error conditions are the same as for @code{pause}.
@end deftypefun
@@ -2993,8 +2994,8 @@ sigset_t mask, oldmask;
@dots{}
-/* @r{Set up the mask of signals to temporarily block.} */
-sigemptyset (&mask);
+/* @r{Set up the mask of signals to temporarily block.} */
+sigemptyset (&mask);
sigaddset (&mask, SIGUSR1);
@dots{}
@@ -3121,7 +3122,7 @@ The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure. If
You tried to disable a stack that was in fact currently in use.
@item ENOMEM
-The size of the alternate stack was too small.
+The size of the alternate stack was too small.
It must be greater than @code{MINSIGSTKSZ}.
@end table
@end deftypefun
@@ -3193,7 +3194,7 @@ The BSD facilities are declared in @file{signal.h}.
@menu
* BSD Handler:: BSD Function to Establish a Handler.
-* Blocking in BSD:: BSD Functions for Blocking Signals.
+* Blocking in BSD:: BSD Functions for Blocking Signals.
@end menu
@node BSD Handler
@@ -3270,7 +3271,7 @@ code @code{EINTR}. @xref{Interrupted Primitives}.
@end deftypefun
@node Blocking in BSD
-@subsection BSD Functions for Blocking Signals
+@subsection BSD Functions for Blocking Signals
@comment signal.h
@comment BSD