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authorRical Jasan <ricaljasan@pacific.net>2017-06-15 21:12:39 -0700
committerRical Jasan <ricaljasan@pacific.net>2017-06-15 21:26:20 -0700
commitd08a7e4cbe43d5e4e4b14dea950fea623d96c1a1 (patch)
tree6f27987046ae0e8804f4d641c99ff1666652117a /manual/pattern.texi
parent27691d5cec9b896ea0792151a27c6d7d7a4065ea (diff)
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manual: Replace summary.awk with summary.pl.
The Summary is now generated from @standards, and syntax-checking is performed. If invalid @standards syntax is detected, summary.pl will fail, reporting all errors. Failure and error reporting is disabled for now, however, since much of the manual is still incomplete wrt. header and standards annotations. Note that the sorting order of the Summary has changed; summary.pl respects the locale, like summary.awk did, but the use of LC_ALL=C is introduced in the Makefile. Other notable deviations are improved detection of the annotated elements' names, which are used for sorting, and improved detection of the @node used to reference into the manual. The most noticeable difference in the rendered Summary is that entries may now contain multiple lines, one for each header and standard combination. summary.pl accepts a `--help' option, which details the expected syntax of @standards. If errors are reported, the user is directed to this feature for further information. * manual/Makefile: Generate summary.texi with summary.pl. Force use of the C locale. Update Perl dependency comment. * manual/header.texi: Update reference to summary.awk. * manual/macros.texi: Refer authors to `summary.pl --help'. * manual/summary.awk: Remove file. * manual/summary.pl: New file. Generate summary.texi, and check for @standards-related syntax errors. * manual/argp.texi: Convert header and standards @comments to @standards. * manual/arith.texi: Likewise. * manual/charset.texi: Likewise. * manual/conf.texi: Likewise. * manual/creature.texi: Likewise. * manual/crypt.texi: Likewise. * manual/ctype.texi: Likewise. * manual/debug.texi: Likewise. * manual/errno.texi: Likewise. * manual/filesys.texi: Likewise. * manual/getopt.texi: Likewise. * manual/job.texi: Likewise. * manual/lang.texi: Likewise. * manual/llio.texi: Likewise. * manual/locale.texi: Likewise. * manual/math.texi: Likewise. * manual/memory.texi: Likewise. * manual/message.texi: Likewise. * manual/pattern.texi: Likewise. * manual/pipe.texi: Likewise. * manual/process.texi: Likewise. * manual/resource.texi: Likewise. * manual/search.texi: Likewise. * manual/setjmp.texi: Likewise. * manual/signal.texi: Likewise. * manual/socket.texi: Likewise. * manual/startup.texi: Likewise. * manual/stdio.texi: Likewise. * manual/string.texi: Likewise. * manual/sysinfo.texi: Likewise. * manual/syslog.texi: Likewise. * manual/terminal.texi: Likewise. * manual/threads.texi: Likewise. * manual/time.texi: Likewise. * manual/users.texi: Likewise.
Diffstat (limited to 'manual/pattern.texi')
-rw-r--r--manual/pattern.texi219
1 files changed, 73 insertions, 146 deletions
diff --git a/manual/pattern.texi b/manual/pattern.texi
index 069a6a23eac..39ae97a3c4d 100644
--- a/manual/pattern.texi
+++ b/manual/pattern.texi
@@ -25,9 +25,8 @@ particular string. The result is a yes or no answer: does the
string fit the pattern or not. The symbols described here are all
declared in @file{fnmatch.h}.
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun int fnmatch (const char *@var{pattern}, const char *@var{string}, int @var{flags})
+@standards{POSIX.2, fnmatch.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{@mtsenv{} @mtslocale{}}@asunsafe{@ascuheap{}}@acunsafe{@acsmem{}}}
@c fnmatch @mtsenv @mtslocale @ascuheap @acsmem
@c strnlen dup ok
@@ -75,24 +74,21 @@ returning nonzero values that are not equal to @code{FNM_NOMATCH}.
These are the available flags for the @var{flags} argument:
@vtable @code
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment GNU
@item FNM_FILE_NAME
+@standards{GNU, fnmatch.h}
Treat the @samp{/} character specially, for matching file names. If
this flag is set, wildcard constructs in @var{pattern} cannot match
@samp{/} in @var{string}. Thus, the only way to match @samp{/} is with
an explicit @samp{/} in @var{pattern}.
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item FNM_PATHNAME
+@standards{POSIX.2, fnmatch.h}
This is an alias for @code{FNM_FILE_NAME}; it comes from POSIX.2. We
don't recommend this name because we don't use the term ``pathname'' for
file names.
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item FNM_PERIOD
+@standards{POSIX.2, fnmatch.h}
Treat the @samp{.} character specially if it appears at the beginning of
@var{string}. If this flag is set, wildcard constructs in @var{pattern}
cannot match @samp{.} as the first character of @var{string}.
@@ -103,9 +99,8 @@ special treatment applies to @samp{.} following @samp{/} as well as to
@code{FNM_PERIOD} and @code{FNM_FILE_NAME} flags together for matching
file names.)
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item FNM_NOESCAPE
+@standards{POSIX.2, fnmatch.h}
Don't treat the @samp{\} character specially in patterns. Normally,
@samp{\} quotes the following character, turning off its special meaning
(if any) so that it matches only itself. When quoting is enabled, the
@@ -114,9 +109,8 @@ mark in the pattern acts like an ordinary character.
If you use @code{FNM_NOESCAPE}, then @samp{\} is an ordinary character.
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment GNU
@item FNM_LEADING_DIR
+@standards{GNU, fnmatch.h}
Ignore a trailing sequence of characters starting with a @samp{/} in
@var{string}; that is to say, test whether @var{string} starts with a
directory name that @var{pattern} matches.
@@ -124,14 +118,12 @@ directory name that @var{pattern} matches.
If this flag is set, either @samp{foo*} or @samp{foobar} as a pattern
would match the string @samp{foobar/frobozz}.
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment GNU
@item FNM_CASEFOLD
+@standards{GNU, fnmatch.h}
Ignore case in comparing @var{string} to @var{pattern}.
-@comment fnmatch.h
-@comment GNU
@item FNM_EXTMATCH
+@standards{GNU, fnmatch.h}
@cindex Korn Shell
@pindex ksh
Besides the normal patterns, also recognize the extended patterns
@@ -193,9 +185,8 @@ this vector, @code{glob} uses a special data type, @code{glob_t}, which
is a structure. You pass @code{glob} the address of the structure, and
it fills in the structure's fields to tell you about the results.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftp {Data Type} glob_t
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
This data type holds a pointer to a word vector. More precisely, it
records both the address of the word vector and its size. The GNU
implementation contains some more fields which are non-standard
@@ -314,9 +305,8 @@ definition for a very similar type. @code{glob64_t} differs from
@code{glob_t} only in the types of the members @code{gl_readdir},
@code{gl_stat}, and @code{gl_lstat}.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@deftp {Data Type} glob64_t
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
This data type holds a pointer to a word vector. More precisely, it
records both the address of the word vector and its size. The GNU
implementation contains some more fields which are non-standard
@@ -393,9 +383,8 @@ This is a GNU extension.
@end table
@end deftp
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun int glob (const char *@var{pattern}, int @var{flags}, int (*@var{errfunc}) (const char *@var{filename}, int @var{error-code}), glob_t *@var{vector-ptr})
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtunsafe{@mtasurace{:utent} @mtsenv{} @mtascusig{:ALRM} @mtascutimer{} @mtslocale{}}@asunsafe{@ascudlopen{} @ascuplugin{} @asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{} @asulock{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
@c glob @mtasurace:utent @mtsenv @mtascusig:ALRM @mtascutimer @mtslocale @ascudlopen @ascuplugin @asucorrupt @ascuheap @asulock @acucorrupt @aculock @acsfd @acsmem
@c strlen dup ok
@@ -480,9 +469,8 @@ If @code{glob} succeeds, it returns 0. Otherwise, it returns one
of these error codes:
@vtable @code
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_ABORTED
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
There was an error opening a directory, and you used the flag
@code{GLOB_ERR} or your specified @var{errfunc} returned a nonzero
value.
@@ -494,17 +482,15 @@ See below
@end ifinfo
for an explanation of the @code{GLOB_ERR} flag and @var{errfunc}.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_NOMATCH
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
The pattern didn't match any existing files. If you use the
@code{GLOB_NOCHECK} flag, then you never get this error code, because
that flag tells @code{glob} to @emph{pretend} that the pattern matched
at least one file.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_NOSPACE
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
It was impossible to allocate memory to hold the result.
@end vtable
@@ -521,9 +507,8 @@ bit. If these callback functions are used and a large file or directory
is encountered @code{glob} @emph{can} fail.
@end deftypefun
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@deftypefun int glob64 (const char *@var{pattern}, int @var{flags}, int (*@var{errfunc}) (const char *@var{filename}, int @var{error-code}), glob64_t *@var{vector-ptr})
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtunsafe{@mtasurace{:utent} @mtsenv{} @mtascusig{:ALRM} @mtascutimer{} @mtslocale{}}@asunsafe{@ascudlopen{} @asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{} @asulock{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
@c Same code as glob, but with glob64_t #defined as glob_t.
The @code{glob64} function was added as part of the Large File Summit
@@ -552,9 +537,8 @@ and combine them with the C bitwise OR operator @code{|}.
Note that there are @ref{More Flags for Globbing} available as GNU extensions.
@vtable @code
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_APPEND
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
Append the words from this expansion to the vector of words produced by
previous calls to @code{glob}. This way you can effectively expand
several words as if they were concatenated with spaces between them.
@@ -570,16 +554,14 @@ have relocated the vector. So always fetch @code{gl_pathv} from the
@code{glob_t} structure after each @code{glob} call; @strong{never} save
the pointer across calls.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_DOOFFS
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
Leave blank slots at the beginning of the vector of words.
The @code{gl_offs} field says how many slots to leave.
The blank slots contain null pointers.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_ERR
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
Give up right away and report an error if there is any difficulty
reading the directories that must be read in order to expand @var{pattern}
fully. Such difficulties might include a directory in which you don't
@@ -604,23 +586,20 @@ The argument @var{filename} is the name of the directory that
If the error handler function returns nonzero, then @code{glob} gives up
right away. Otherwise, it continues.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_MARK
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
If the pattern matches the name of a directory, append @samp{/} to the
directory's name when returning it.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_NOCHECK
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
If the pattern doesn't match any file names, return the pattern itself
as if it were a file name that had been matched. (Normally, when the
pattern doesn't match anything, @code{glob} returns that there were no
matches.)
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_NOESCAPE
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
Don't treat the @samp{\} character specially in patterns. Normally,
@samp{\} quotes the following character, turning off its special meaning
(if any) so that it matches only itself. When quoting is enabled, the
@@ -633,9 +612,8 @@ If you use @code{GLOB_NOESCAPE}, then @samp{\} is an ordinary character.
repeatedly. It handles the flag @code{GLOB_NOESCAPE} by turning on the
@code{FNM_NOESCAPE} flag in calls to @code{fnmatch}.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item GLOB_NOSORT
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
Don't sort the file names; return them in no particular order.
(In practice, the order will depend on the order of the entries in
the directory.) The only reason @emph{not} to sort is to save time.
@@ -650,23 +628,20 @@ Beside the flags described in the last section, the GNU implementation of
which is available in modern shell implementations.
@vtable @code
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_PERIOD
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
The @code{.} character (period) is treated special. It cannot be
matched by wildcards. @xref{Wildcard Matching}, @code{FNM_PERIOD}.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_MAGCHAR
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
The @code{GLOB_MAGCHAR} value is not to be given to @code{glob} in the
@var{flags} parameter. Instead, @code{glob} sets this bit in the
@var{gl_flags} element of the @var{glob_t} structure provided as the
result if the pattern used for matching contains any wildcard character.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_ALTDIRFUNC
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
Instead of using the normal functions for accessing the
filesystem the @code{glob} implementation uses the user-supplied
functions specified in the structure pointed to by @var{pglob}
@@ -674,9 +649,8 @@ parameter. For more information about the functions refer to the
sections about directory handling see @ref{Accessing Directories}, and
@ref{Reading Attributes}.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_BRACE
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
If this flag is given, the handling of braces in the pattern is changed.
It is now required that braces appear correctly grouped. I.e., for each
opening brace there must be a closing one. Braces can be used
@@ -710,15 +684,13 @@ glob ("baz", GLOB_BRACE|GLOB_APPEND, NULL, &result)
@noindent
if we leave aside error handling.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_NOMAGIC
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
If the pattern contains no wildcard constructs (it is a literal file name),
return it as the sole ``matching'' word, even if no file exists by that name.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_TILDE
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
If this flag is used the character @code{~} (tilde) is handled specially
if it appears at the beginning of the pattern. Instead of being taken
verbatim it is used to represent the home directory of a known user.
@@ -753,9 +725,8 @@ looking for a directory named @code{~homer}.
This functionality is equivalent to what is available in C-shells if the
@code{nonomatch} flag is set.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_TILDE_CHECK
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
If this flag is used @code{glob} behaves as if @code{GLOB_TILDE} is
given. The only difference is that if the user name is not available or
the home directory cannot be determined for other reasons this leads to
@@ -765,9 +736,8 @@ the pattern itself as the name.
This functionality is equivalent to what is available in C-shells if
the @code{nonomatch} flag is not set.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@item GLOB_ONLYDIR
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
If this flag is used the globbing function takes this as a
@strong{hint} that the caller is only interested in directories
matching the pattern. If the information about the type of the file
@@ -787,9 +757,8 @@ type @code{glob_t} is used in multiple call to @code{glob} the resources
are freed or reused so that no leaks appear. But this does not include
the time when all @code{glob} calls are done.
-@comment glob.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun void globfree (glob_t *@var{pglob})
+@standards{POSIX.2, glob.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@asunsafe{@asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @acsmem{}}}
@c globfree dup @asucorrupt @ascuheap @acucorrupt @acsmem
@c free dup @ascuheap @acsmem
@@ -799,9 +768,8 @@ calls to @code{glob} associated with the object pointed to by
@code{glob_t} typed object isn't used anymore.
@end deftypefun
-@comment glob.h
-@comment GNU
@deftypefun void globfree64 (glob64_t *@var{pglob})
+@standards{GNU, glob.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@asunsafe{@asucorrupt{} @asulock{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
This function is equivalent to @code{globfree} but it frees records of
type @code{glob64_t} which were allocated by @code{glob64}.
@@ -842,9 +810,8 @@ compiled regular expression for matching.)
There is a special data type for compiled regular expressions:
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftp {Data Type} regex_t
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
This type of object holds a compiled regular expression.
It is actually a structure. It has just one field that your programs
should look at:
@@ -862,9 +829,8 @@ only the functions in the library should use them.
After you create a @code{regex_t} object, you can compile a regular
expression into it by calling @code{regcomp}.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun int regcomp (regex_t *restrict @var{compiled}, const char *restrict @var{pattern}, int @var{cflags})
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{@mtslocale{}}@asunsafe{@asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{} @asulock{} @ascudlopen{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsmem{} @acsfd{}}}
@c All of the issues have to do with memory allocation and multi-byte
@c character handling present in the input string, or implied by ranges
@@ -1144,71 +1110,59 @@ describing the reason for a nonzero value; see @ref{Regexp Cleanup}.
Here are the possible nonzero values that @code{regcomp} can return:
@vtable @code
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_BADBR
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
There was an invalid @samp{\@{@dots{}\@}} construct in the regular
expression. A valid @samp{\@{@dots{}\@}} construct must contain either
a single number, or two numbers in increasing order separated by a
comma.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_BADPAT
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
There was a syntax error in the regular expression.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_BADRPT
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
A repetition operator such as @samp{?} or @samp{*} appeared in a bad
position (with no preceding subexpression to act on).
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_ECOLLATE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
The regular expression referred to an invalid collating element (one not
defined in the current locale for string collation). @xref{Locale
Categories}.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_ECTYPE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
The regular expression referred to an invalid character class name.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_EESCAPE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
The regular expression ended with @samp{\}.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_ESUBREG
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
There was an invalid number in the @samp{\@var{digit}} construct.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_EBRACK
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
There were unbalanced square brackets in the regular expression.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_EPAREN
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
An extended regular expression had unbalanced parentheses,
or a basic regular expression had unbalanced @samp{\(} and @samp{\)}.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_EBRACE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
The regular expression had unbalanced @samp{\@{} and @samp{\@}}.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_ERANGE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
One of the endpoints in a range expression was invalid.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_ESPACE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
@code{regcomp} ran out of memory.
@end vtable
@@ -1219,25 +1173,21 @@ These are the bit flags that you can use in the @var{cflags} operand when
compiling a regular expression with @code{regcomp}.
@vtable @code
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_EXTENDED
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
Treat the pattern as an extended regular expression, rather than as a
basic regular expression.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_ICASE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
Ignore case when matching letters.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_NOSUB
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
Don't bother storing the contents of the @var{matchptr} array.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_NEWLINE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
Treat a newline in @var{string} as dividing @var{string} into multiple
lines, so that @samp{$} can match before the newline and @samp{^} can
match after. Also, don't permit @samp{.} to match a newline, and don't
@@ -1255,9 +1205,8 @@ Regexp Compilation}, you can match it against strings using
unless the regular expression contains anchor characters (@samp{^} or
@samp{$}).
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun int regexec (const regex_t *restrict @var{compiled}, const char *restrict @var{string}, size_t @var{nmatch}, regmatch_t @var{matchptr}[restrict], int @var{eflags})
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{@mtslocale{}}@asunsafe{@asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{} @asulock{} @ascudlopen{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsmem{} @acsfd{}}}
@c libc_lock_lock @asulock @aculock
@c re_search_internal @mtslocale @asucorrupt @ascuheap @asulock @ascudlopen @acucorrupt @aculock @acsmem @acsfd
@@ -1525,16 +1474,14 @@ The function @code{regexec} accepts the following flags in the
@var{eflags} argument:
@vtable @code
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_NOTBOL
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
Do not regard the beginning of the specified string as the beginning of
a line; more generally, don't make any assumptions about what text might
precede it.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_NOTEOL
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
Do not regard the end of the specified string as the end of a line; more
generally, don't make any assumptions about what text might follow it.
@end vtable
@@ -1542,14 +1489,12 @@ generally, don't make any assumptions about what text might follow it.
Here are the possible nonzero values that @code{regexec} can return:
@vtable @code
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_NOMATCH
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
The pattern didn't match the string. This isn't really an error.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item REG_ESPACE
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
@code{regexec} ran out of memory.
@end vtable
@@ -1565,9 +1510,8 @@ the entire regular expression. Each other element of the array records
the beginning and end of the part that matched a single parenthetical
subexpression.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftp {Data Type} regmatch_t
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
This is the data type of the @var{matchptr} array that you pass to
@code{regexec}. It contains two structure fields, as follows:
@@ -1581,9 +1525,8 @@ The offset in @var{string} of the end of the substring.
@end table
@end deftp
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftp {Data Type} regoff_t
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
@code{regoff_t} is an alias for another signed integer type.
The fields of @code{regmatch_t} have type @code{regoff_t}.
@end deftp
@@ -1658,9 +1601,8 @@ reports nonuse of the ``na'' subexpression.
When you are finished using a compiled regular expression, you can
free the storage it uses by calling @code{regfree}.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun void regfree (regex_t *@var{compiled})
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@asunsafe{@ascuheap{}}@acunsafe{@acsmem{}}}
@c (re_)free dup @ascuheap @acsmem
@c free_dfa_content dup @ascuheap @acsmem
@@ -1678,9 +1620,8 @@ expression.
When @code{regcomp} or @code{regexec} reports an error, you can use
the function @code{regerror} to turn it into an error message string.
-@comment regex.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun size_t regerror (int @var{errcode}, const regex_t *restrict @var{compiled}, char *restrict @var{buffer}, size_t @var{length})
+@standards{POSIX.2, regex.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{@mtsenv{}}@asunsafe{@asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{} @asulock{} @ascudlopen{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
@c regerror calls gettext, strcmp and mempcpy or memcpy.
This function produces an error message string for the error code
@@ -1816,9 +1757,8 @@ vector, @code{wordexp} uses a special data type, @code{wordexp_t}, which
is a structure. You pass @code{wordexp} the address of the structure,
and it fills in the structure's fields to tell you about the results.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftp {Data Type} {wordexp_t}
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
This data type holds a pointer to a word vector. More precisely, it
records both the address of the word vector and its size.
@@ -1845,9 +1785,8 @@ the beginning of the vector.
@end table
@end deftp
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun int wordexp (const char *@var{words}, wordexp_t *@var{word-vector-ptr}, int @var{flags})
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtunsafe{@mtasurace{:utent} @mtasuconst{:@mtsenv{}} @mtsenv{} @mtascusig{:ALRM} @mtascutimer{} @mtslocale{}}@asunsafe{@ascudlopen{} @ascuplugin{} @ascuintl{} @ascuheap{} @asucorrupt{} @asulock{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @aculock{} @acsfd{} @acsmem{}}}
@c wordexp @mtasurace:utent @mtasuconst:@mtsenv @mtsenv @mtascusig:ALRM @mtascutimer @mtslocale @ascudlopen @ascuplugin @ascuintl @ascuheap @asucorrupt @asulock @acucorrupt @aculock @acsfd @acsmem
@c w_newword ok
@@ -2014,43 +1953,37 @@ If @code{wordexp} succeeds, it returns 0. Otherwise, it returns one
of these error codes:
@vtable @code
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_BADCHAR
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
The input string @var{words} contains an unquoted invalid character such
as @samp{|}.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_BADVAL
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
The input string refers to an undefined shell variable, and you used the flag
@code{WRDE_UNDEF} to forbid such references.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_CMDSUB
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
The input string uses command substitution, and you used the flag
@code{WRDE_NOCMD} to forbid command substitution.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_NOSPACE
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
It was impossible to allocate memory to hold the result. In this case,
@code{wordexp} can store part of the results---as much as it could
allocate room for.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_SYNTAX
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
There was a syntax error in the input string. For example, an unmatched
quoting character is a syntax error. This error code is also used to
signal division by zero and overflow in arithmetic expansion.
@end vtable
@end deftypefun
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@deftypefun void wordfree (wordexp_t *@var{word-vector-ptr})
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
@safety{@prelim{}@mtsafe{}@asunsafe{@asucorrupt{} @ascuheap{}}@acunsafe{@acucorrupt{} @acsmem{}}}
@c wordfree dup @asucorrupt @ascuheap @acucorrupt @acsmem
@c free dup @ascuheap @acsmem
@@ -2068,9 +2001,8 @@ This section describes the flags that you can specify in the
and combine them with the C operator @code{|}.
@vtable @code
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_APPEND
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
Append the words from this expansion to the vector of words produced by
previous calls to @code{wordexp}. This way you can effectively expand
several words as if they were concatenated with spaces between them.
@@ -2080,22 +2012,19 @@ word vector structure between calls to @code{wordexp}. And, if you set
@code{WRDE_DOOFFS} in the first call to @code{wordexp}, you must also
set it when you append to the results.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_DOOFFS
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
Leave blank slots at the beginning of the vector of words.
The @code{we_offs} field says how many slots to leave.
The blank slots contain null pointers.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_NOCMD
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
Don't do command substitution; if the input requests command substitution,
report an error.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_REUSE
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
Reuse a word vector made by a previous call to @code{wordexp}.
Instead of allocating a new vector of words, this call to @code{wordexp}
will use the vector that already exists (making it larger if necessary).
@@ -2104,17 +2033,15 @@ Note that the vector may move, so it is not safe to save an old pointer
and use it again after calling @code{wordexp}. You must fetch
@code{we_pathv} anew after each call.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_SHOWERR
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
Do show any error messages printed by commands run by command substitution.
More precisely, allow these commands to inherit the standard error output
stream of the current process. By default, @code{wordexp} gives these
commands a standard error stream that discards all output.
-@comment wordexp.h
-@comment POSIX.2
@item WRDE_UNDEF
+@standards{POSIX.2, wordexp.h}
If the input refers to a shell variable that is not defined, report an
error.
@end vtable