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authorJoseph Myers <joseph@codesourcery.com>2012-02-28 14:44:20 +0000
committerJoseph Myers <joseph@codesourcery.com>2012-02-28 14:44:20 +0000
commit1f77f0491f10f67442876cffbda387eac9eafe4d (patch)
tree17ad3299a2c8e6198ffb4a6c33e94e38f816e284
parent450bf206b4eba7e2288bc6c6e487f60e26165dce (diff)
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Use Texinfo macros to refer to the GNU C Library within the manual.
-rw-r--r--ChangeLog49
-rw-r--r--INSTALL192
-rw-r--r--Makefile4
-rw-r--r--NOTES12
-rw-r--r--manual/arith.texi24
-rw-r--r--manual/charset.texi46
-rw-r--r--manual/conf.texi29
-rw-r--r--manual/contrib.texi10
-rw-r--r--manual/creature.texi7
-rw-r--r--manual/crypt.texi4
-rw-r--r--manual/ctype.texi6
-rw-r--r--manual/errno.texi14
-rw-r--r--manual/filesys.texi14
-rw-r--r--manual/header.texi2
-rw-r--r--manual/install.texi91
-rw-r--r--manual/intro.texi44
-rw-r--r--manual/io.texi12
-rw-r--r--manual/job.texi4
-rw-r--r--manual/lang.texi16
-rw-r--r--manual/libc.texinfo6
-rw-r--r--manual/llio.texi14
-rw-r--r--manual/locale.texi12
-rw-r--r--manual/macros.texi20
-rw-r--r--manual/maint.texi16
-rw-r--r--manual/math.texi18
-rw-r--r--manual/memory.texi32
-rw-r--r--manual/message.texi27
-rw-r--r--manual/nss.texi12
-rw-r--r--manual/pattern.texi6
-rw-r--r--manual/process.texi16
-rw-r--r--manual/resource.texi16
-rw-r--r--manual/search.texi8
-rw-r--r--manual/setjmp.texi6
-rw-r--r--manual/signal.texi18
-rw-r--r--manual/socket.texi6
-rw-r--r--manual/startup.texi22
-rw-r--r--manual/stdio.texi54
-rw-r--r--manual/string.texi22
-rw-r--r--manual/sysinfo.texi20
-rw-r--r--manual/syslog.texi12
-rw-r--r--manual/terminal.texi6
-rw-r--r--manual/time.texi32
-rw-r--r--manual/users.texi14
43 files changed, 535 insertions, 460 deletions
diff --git a/ChangeLog b/ChangeLog
index a1a6c50d012..fd6efc3bf21 100644
--- a/ChangeLog
+++ b/ChangeLog
@@ -1,3 +1,52 @@
+2012-02-28 Joseph Myers <joseph@codesourcery.com>
+
+ * manual/macros.texi: New file.
+ * Makefile (INSTALL, NOTES): Depend on manual/macros.texi.
+ * manual/libc.texinfo: Include macros.texi.
+ * manual/creatute.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/install.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/arith.texi: Use macros @Theglibc{}, @theglibc{} and
+ @glibcadj{} in references to the GNU C Library.
+ * manual/charset.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/conf.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/contrib.texi: Likewise. Consistently use "GNU C Library"
+ when not using those macros.
+ * manual/creature.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/crypt.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/errno.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/filesys.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/header.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/install.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/intro.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/io.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/job.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/lang.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/libc.texiinfo: Likewise.
+ * manual/llio.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/locale.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/maint.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/math.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/memory.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/message.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/nss.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/pattern.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/process.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/resource.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/search.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/setjmp.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/signal.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/socket.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/startup.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/stdio.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/string.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/sysinfo.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/syslog.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/terminal.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/time.texi: Likewise.
+ * manual/users.texi: Likewise.
+ * INSTALL: Regenerated.
+ * NOTES: Regenerated.
+
2012-02-28 Andreas Schwab <schwab@linux-m68k.org>
* include/dirent.h: Include <dirstream.h> before
diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index bb7850d978e..748b2d38564 100644
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
@@ -6,24 +6,24 @@ the top level of the source tree. This file answers common questions
and describes problems you may experience with compilation and
installation. It is updated more frequently than this manual.
- Features can be added to GNU Libc via "add-on" bundles. These are
-separate tar files, which you unpack into the top level of the source
-tree. Then you give `configure' the `--enable-add-ons' option to
-activate them, and they will be compiled into the library.
+ Features can be added to the GNU C Library via "add-on" bundles.
+These are separate tar files, which you unpack into the top level of
+the source tree. Then you give `configure' the `--enable-add-ons'
+option to activate them, and they will be compiled into the library.
You will need recent versions of several GNU tools: definitely GCC
and GNU Make, and possibly others. *Note Tools for Compilation::,
below.
-Configuring and compiling GNU Libc
-==================================
+Configuring and compiling the GNU C Library
+===========================================
-GNU libc cannot be compiled in the source directory. You must build it
-in a separate build directory. For example, if you have unpacked the
-glibc sources in `/src/gnu/glibc-VERSION', create a directory
-`/src/gnu/glibc-build' to put the object files in. This allows
-removing the whole build directory in case an error occurs, which is
-the safest way to get a fresh start and should always be done.
+The GNU C Library cannot be compiled in the source directory. You must
+build it in a separate build directory. For example, if you have
+unpacked the GNU C Library sources in `/src/gnu/glibc-VERSION', create
+a directory `/src/gnu/glibc-build' to put the object files in. This
+allows removing the whole build directory in case an error occurs,
+which is the safest way to get a fresh start and should always be done.
From your object directory, run the shell script `configure' located
at the top level of the source tree. In the scenario above, you'd type
@@ -36,10 +36,10 @@ directory, especially some files in the manual subdirectory.
`configure' takes many options, but the only one that is usually
mandatory is `--prefix'. This option tells `configure' where you want
-glibc installed. This defaults to `/usr/local', but the normal setting
-to install as the standard system library is `--prefix=/usr' for
-GNU/Linux systems and `--prefix=' (an empty prefix) for GNU/Hurd
-systems.
+the GNU C Library installed. This defaults to `/usr/local', but the
+normal setting to install as the standard system library is
+`--prefix=/usr' for GNU/Linux systems and `--prefix=' (an empty prefix)
+for GNU/Hurd systems.
It may also be useful to set the CC and CFLAGS variables in the
environment when running `configure'. CC selects the C compiler that
@@ -59,16 +59,16 @@ will be used, and CFLAGS sets optimization options for the compiler.
`--with-headers=DIRECTORY'
Look for kernel header files in DIRECTORY, not `/usr/include'.
- Glibc needs information from the kernel's header files describing
- the interface to the kernel. Glibc will normally look in
- `/usr/include' for them, but if you specify this option, it will
- look in DIRECTORY instead.
+ The GNU C Library needs information from the kernel's header files
+ describing the interface to the kernel. The GNU C Library will
+ normally look in `/usr/include' for them, but if you specify this
+ option, it will look in DIRECTORY instead.
This option is primarily of use on a system where the headers in
- `/usr/include' come from an older version of glibc. Conflicts can
- occasionally happen in this case. You can also use this option if
- you want to compile glibc with a newer set of kernel headers than
- the ones found in `/usr/include'.
+ `/usr/include' come from an older version of the GNU C Library.
+ Conflicts can occasionally happen in this case. You can also use
+ this option if you want to compile the GNU C Library with a newer
+ set of kernel headers than the ones found in `/usr/include'.
`--enable-add-ons[=LIST]'
Specify add-on packages to include in the build. If this option is
@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ will be used, and CFLAGS sets optimization options for the compiler.
Use the binutils (assembler and linker) in `DIRECTORY', not the
ones the C compiler would default to. You can use this option if
the default binutils on your system cannot deal with all the
- constructs in the GNU C library. In that case, `configure' will
+ constructs in the GNU C Library. In that case, `configure' will
detect the problem and suppress these constructs, so that the
library will still be usable, but functionality may be lost--for
example, you can't build a shared libc with old binutils.
@@ -132,10 +132,10 @@ will be used, and CFLAGS sets optimization options for the compiler.
`--host=HOST-SYSTEM'
These options are for cross-compiling. If you specify both
options and BUILD-SYSTEM is different from HOST-SYSTEM, `configure'
- will prepare to cross-compile glibc from BUILD-SYSTEM to be used
- on HOST-SYSTEM. You'll probably need the `--with-headers' option
- too, and you may have to override CONFIGURE's selection of the
- compiler and/or binutils.
+ will prepare to cross-compile the GNU C Library from BUILD-SYSTEM
+ to be used on HOST-SYSTEM. You'll probably need the
+ `--with-headers' option too, and you may have to override
+ CONFIGURE's selection of the compiler and/or binutils.
If you only specify `--host', `configure' will prepare for a
native compile but use what you specify instead of guessing what
@@ -167,8 +167,8 @@ facilities, type `make check'. If it does not complete successfully,
do not use the built library, and report a bug after verifying that the
problem is not already known. *Note Reporting Bugs::, for instructions
on reporting bugs. Note that some of the tests assume they are not
-being run by `root'. We recommend you compile and test glibc as an
-unprivileged user.
+being run by `root'. We recommend you compile and test the GNU C
+Library as an unprivileged user.
Before reporting bugs make sure there is no problem with your system.
The tests (and later installation) use some pre-existing files of the
@@ -188,7 +188,7 @@ build directory and add values as appropriate for your system. The
file is included and parsed by `make' and has to follow the conventions
for makefiles.
- It is easy to configure the GNU C library for cross-compilation by
+ It is easy to configure the GNU C Library for cross-compilation by
setting a few variables in `configparms'. Set `CC' to the
cross-compiler for the target you configured the library for; it is
important to use this same `CC' value when running `configure', like
@@ -204,16 +204,16 @@ Installing the C Library
To install the library and its header files, and the Info files of the
manual, type `env LANGUAGE=C LC_ALL=C make install'. This will build
things, if necessary, before installing them; however, you should still
-compile everything first. If you are installing glibc as your primary
-C library, we recommend that you shut the system down to single-user
-mode first, and reboot afterward. This minimizes the risk of breaking
-things when the library changes out from underneath.
+compile everything first. If you are installing the GNU C Library as
+your primary C library, we recommend that you shut the system down to
+single-user mode first, and reboot afterward. This minimizes the risk
+of breaking things when the library changes out from underneath.
`make install' will do the entire job of upgrading from a previous
-installation of glibc 2.x. There may sometimes be headers left behind
-from the previous installation, but those are generally harmless. If
-you want to avoid leaving headers behind you can do things in the
-following order.
+installation of the GNU C Library version 2.x. There may sometimes be
+headers left behind from the previous installation, but those are
+generally harmless. If you want to avoid leaving headers behind you
+can do things in the following order.
You must first build the library (`make'), optionally check it
(`make check'), switch the include directories and then install (`make
@@ -224,19 +224,20 @@ library requires the ability to compile and run programs against the old
library. The new `/usr/include', after switching the include
directories and before installing the library should contain the Linux
headers, but nothing else. If you do this, you will need to restore
-any headers from non-glibc libraries youself after installing the
-library.
+any headers from libraries other than the GNU C Library yourself after
+installing the library.
- You can install glibc somewhere other than where you configured it
-to go by setting the `install_root' variable on the command line for
-`make install'. The value of this variable is prepended to all the
-paths for installation. This is useful when setting up a chroot
-environment or preparing a binary distribution. The directory should be
-specified with an absolute file name.
+ You can install the GNU C Library somewhere other than where you
+configured it to go by setting the `install_root' variable on the
+command line for `make install'. The value of this variable is
+prepended to all the paths for installation. This is useful when
+setting up a chroot environment or preparing a binary distribution.
+The directory should be specified with an absolute file name.
- Glibc includes a daemon called `nscd', which you may or may not want
-to run. `nscd' caches name service lookups; it can dramatically
-improve performance with NIS+, and may help with DNS as well.
+ The GNU C Library includes a daemon called `nscd', which you may or
+may not want to run. `nscd' caches name service lookups; it can
+dramatically improve performance with NIS+, and may help with DNS as
+well.
One auxiliary program, `/usr/libexec/pt_chown', is installed setuid
`root'. This program is invoked by the `grantpt' function; it sets the
@@ -249,12 +250,12 @@ this program; otherwise you do. The source for `pt_chown' is in
`login/programs/pt_chown.c'.
After installation you might want to configure the timezone and
-locale installation of your system. The GNU C library comes with a
+locale installation of your system. The GNU C Library comes with a
locale database which gets configured with `localedef'. For example, to
set up a German locale with name `de_DE', simply issue the command
`localedef -i de_DE -f ISO-8859-1 de_DE'. To configure all locales
-that are supported by glibc, you can issue from your build directory the
-command `make localedata/install-locales'.
+that are supported by the GNU C Library, you can issue from your build
+directory the command `make localedata/install-locales'.
To configure the locally used timezone, set the `TZ' environment
variable. The script `tzselect' helps you to select the right value.
@@ -269,7 +270,7 @@ Recommended Tools for Compilation
=================================
We recommend installing the following GNU tools before attempting to
-build the GNU C library:
+build the GNU C Library:
* GNU `make' 3.79 or newer
@@ -282,17 +283,17 @@ build the GNU C library:
* GCC 4.3 or newer, GCC 4.6 recommended
GCC 4.3 or higher is required; as of this writing, GCC 4.6 is the
- compiler we advise to use to build the GNU C library.
+ compiler we advise to use to build the GNU C Library.
- You can use whatever compiler you like to compile programs that
- use GNU libc.
+ You can use whatever compiler you like to compile programs that use
+ the GNU C Library.
Check the FAQ for any special compiler issues on particular
platforms.
* GNU `binutils' 2.15 or later
- You must use GNU `binutils' (as and ld) to build the GNU C library.
+ You must use GNU `binutils' (as and ld) to build the GNU C Library.
No other assembler or linker has the necessary functionality at the
moment.
@@ -338,41 +339,42 @@ patches, although we try to avoid this.
Specific advice for GNU/Linux systems
=====================================
-If you are installing GNU libc on a GNU/Linux system, you need to have
-the header files from a 2.6.19.1 or newer kernel around for reference.
-These headers must be installed using `make headers_install'; the
-headers present in the kernel source directory are not suitable for
-direct use by GNU libc. You do not need to use that kernel, just have
-its headers installed where glibc can access them, referred to here as
-INSTALL-DIRECTORY. The easiest way to do this is to unpack it in a
-directory such as `/usr/src/linux-VERSION'. In that directory, run
-`make headers_install INSTALL_HDR_PATH=INSTALL-DIRECTORY'. Finally,
-configure glibc with the option
-`--with-headers=INSTALL-DIRECTORY/include'. Use the most recent kernel
-you can get your hands on. (If you are cross-compiling GNU libc, you
-need to specify `ARCH=ARCHITECTURE' in the `make headers_install'
-command, where ARCHITECTURE is the architecture name used by the Linux
-kernel, such as `x86' or `powerpc'.)
-
- After installing GNU libc, you may need to remove or rename
+If you are installing the GNU C Library on a GNU/Linux system, you need
+to have the header files from a 2.6.19.1 or newer kernel around for
+reference. These headers must be installed using `make
+headers_install'; the headers present in the kernel source directory
+are not suitable for direct use by the GNU C Library. You do not need
+to use that kernel, just have its headers installed where the GNU C
+Library can access them, referred to here as INSTALL-DIRECTORY. The
+easiest way to do this is to unpack it in a directory such as
+`/usr/src/linux-VERSION'. In that directory, run `make headers_install
+INSTALL_HDR_PATH=INSTALL-DIRECTORY'. Finally, configure the GNU C
+Library with the option `--with-headers=INSTALL-DIRECTORY/include'.
+Use the most recent kernel you can get your hands on. (If you are
+cross-compiling the GNU C Library, you need to specify
+`ARCH=ARCHITECTURE' in the `make headers_install' command, where
+ARCHITECTURE is the architecture name used by the Linux kernel, such as
+`x86' or `powerpc'.)
+
+ After installing the GNU C Library, you may need to remove or rename
directories such as `/usr/include/linux' and `/usr/include/asm', and
replace them with copies of directories such as `linux' and `asm' from
`INSTALL-DIRECTORY/include'. All directories present in
-`INSTALL-DIRECTORY/include' should be copied, except that GNU libc
-provides its own version of `/usr/include/scsi'; the files provided by
-the kernel should be copied without replacing those provided by GNU
-libc. The `linux', `asm' and `asm-generic' directories are required to
-compile programs using GNU libc; the other directories describe
-interfaces to the kernel but are not required if not compiling programs
-using those interfaces. You do not need to copy kernel headers if you
-did not specify an alternate kernel header source using
-`--with-headers'.
-
- GNU/Linux expects some components of the libc installation to be in
-`/lib' and some in `/usr/lib'. This is handled automatically if you
-configure glibc with `--prefix=/usr'. If you set some other prefix or
-allow it to default to `/usr/local', then all the components are
-installed there.
+`INSTALL-DIRECTORY/include' should be copied, except that the GNU C
+Library provides its own version of `/usr/include/scsi'; the files
+provided by the kernel should be copied without replacing those
+provided by the GNU C Library. The `linux', `asm' and `asm-generic'
+directories are required to compile programs using the GNU C Library;
+the other directories describe interfaces to the kernel but are not
+required if not compiling programs using those interfaces. You do not
+need to copy kernel headers if you did not specify an alternate kernel
+header source using `--with-headers'.
+
+ GNU/Linux expects some components of the GNU C Library installation
+to be in `/lib' and some in `/usr/lib'. This is handled automatically
+if you configure the GNU C Library with `--prefix=/usr'. If you set
+some other prefix or allow it to default to `/usr/local', then all the
+components are installed there.
You cannot use `nscd' with 2.0 kernels, due to bugs in the
kernel-side thread support. `nscd' happens to hit these bugs
@@ -382,7 +384,7 @@ program.
Reporting Bugs
==============
-There are probably bugs in the GNU C library. There are certainly
+There are probably bugs in the GNU C Library. There are certainly
errors and omissions in this manual. If you report them, they will get
fixed. If you don't, no one will ever know about them and they will
remain unfixed for all eternity, if not longer.
@@ -396,14 +398,14 @@ includes a patch or a hint on solving the problem.
To report a bug, first you must find it. With any luck, this will
be the hard part. Once you've found a bug, make sure it's really a
-bug. A good way to do this is to see if the GNU C library behaves the
+bug. A good way to do this is to see if the GNU C Library behaves the
same way some other C library does. If so, probably you are wrong and
the libraries are right (but not necessarily). If not, one of the
-libraries is probably wrong. It might not be the GNU library. Many
+libraries is probably wrong. It might not be the GNU C Library. Many
historical Unix C libraries permit things that we don't, such as
closing a file twice.
- If you think you have found some way in which the GNU C library does
+ If you think you have found some way in which the GNU C Library does
not conform to the ISO and POSIX standards (*note Standards and
Portability::), that is definitely a bug. Report it!
diff --git a/Makefile b/Makefile
index 10a2cce4eaf..5a31adba9eb 100644
--- a/Makefile
+++ b/Makefile
@@ -398,8 +398,8 @@ define format-me
makeinfo --no-validate --plaintext --no-number-sections $< -o $@
-chmod a-w $@
endef
-INSTALL: manual/install.texi; $(format-me)
-NOTES: manual/creature.texi; $(format-me)
+INSTALL: manual/install.texi manual/macros.texi; $(format-me)
+NOTES: manual/creature.texi manual/macros.texi; $(format-me)
manual/dir-add.texi manual/dir-add.info: FORCE
$(MAKE) $(PARALLELMFLAGS) -C $(@D) $(@F)
FAQ: scripts/gen-FAQ.pl FAQ.in
diff --git a/NOTES b/NOTES
index 9bef2425bd2..552f4cd609d 100644
--- a/NOTES
+++ b/NOTES
@@ -164,9 +164,9 @@ relying on semantics undefined within the standard.
-- Macro: _ISOC99_SOURCE
Until the revised ISO C standard is widely adopted the new features
- are not automatically enabled. The GNU libc nevertheless has a
- complete implementation of the new standard and to enable the new
- features the macro `_ISOC99_SOURCE' should be defined.
+ are not automatically enabled. The GNU C Library nevertheless has
+ a complete implementation of the new standard and to enable the
+ new features the macro `_ISOC99_SOURCE' should be defined.
-- Macro: _GNU_SOURCE
If you define this macro, everything is included: ISO C89,
@@ -184,7 +184,7 @@ relying on semantics undefined within the standard.
Note that if you do this, you must link your program with the BSD
compatibility library by passing the `-lbsd-compat' option to the
- compiler or linker. *Note:* If you forget to do this, you may get
+ compiler or linker. *NB:* If you forget to do this, you may get
very strange errors at run time.
-- Macro: _REENTRANT
@@ -192,8 +192,8 @@ relying on semantics undefined within the standard.
If you define one of these macros, reentrant versions of several
functions get declared. Some of the functions are specified in
POSIX.1c but many others are only available on a few other systems
- or are unique to GNU libc. The problem is the delay in the
- standardization of the thread safe C library interface.
+ or are unique to the GNU C Library. The problem is the delay in
+ the standardization of the thread safe C library interface.
Unlike on some other systems, no special version of the C library
must be used for linking. There is only one version but while
diff --git a/manual/arith.texi b/manual/arith.texi
index e59da41c4b3..572808c8935 100644
--- a/manual/arith.texi
+++ b/manual/arith.texi
@@ -40,9 +40,9 @@ this is that a program often needs to be written for a particular range
of integers, and sometimes must be written for a particular size of
storage, regardless of what machine the program runs on.
-To address this problem, the GNU C library contains C type definitions
+To address this problem, @theglibc{} contains C type definitions
you can use to declare integers that meet your exact needs. Because the
-GNU C library header files are customized to a specific machine, your
+@glibcadj{} header files are customized to a specific machine, your
program source code doesn't have to be.
These @code{typedef}s are in @file{stdint.h}.
@@ -105,7 +105,7 @@ of the integer.
@item uintmax_t
@end itemize
-The GNU C library also provides macros that tell you the maximum and
+@Theglibc{} also provides macros that tell you the maximum and
minimum possible values for each integer data type. The macro names
follow these examples: @code{INT32_MAX}, @code{UINT8_MAX},
@code{INT_FAST32_MIN}, @code{INT_LEAST64_MIN}, @code{UINTMAX_MAX},
@@ -388,7 +388,7 @@ to
@end deftypefn
Another set of floating-point classification functions was provided by
-BSD. The GNU C library also supports these functions; however, we
+BSD. @Theglibc{} also supports these functions; however, we
recommend that you use the ISO C99 macros in new code. Those are standard
and will be available more widely. Also, since they are macros, you do
not have to worry about the type of their argument.
@@ -1019,7 +1019,7 @@ Implementation defined macros with names starting with @code{FE_} and
having type @code{fenv_t *}.
@vindex FE_NOMASK_ENV
-If possible, the GNU C Library defines a macro @code{FE_NOMASK_ENV}
+If possible, @theglibc{} defines a macro @code{FE_NOMASK_ENV}
which represents an environment where every exception raised causes a
trap to occur. You can test for this macro using @code{#ifdef}. It is
only defined if @code{_GNU_SOURCE} is defined.
@@ -1813,7 +1813,7 @@ On processors which do not implement multiply-add in hardware,
@file{math.h} defines the symbols @code{FP_FAST_FMA},
@code{FP_FAST_FMAF}, and @code{FP_FAST_FMAL} when the corresponding
version of @code{fma} is no slower than the expression @samp{x*y + z}.
-In the GNU C library, this always means the operation is implemented in
+In @theglibc{}, this always means the operation is implemented in
hardware.
@end deftypefun
@@ -2445,7 +2445,7 @@ is provided mostly for compatibility with existing code; using
@code{strtod} is more robust.
@end deftypefun
-The GNU C library also provides @samp{_l} versions of these functions,
+@Theglibc{} also provides @samp{_l} versions of these functions,
which take an additional argument, the locale to use in conversion.
@xref{Parsing of Integers}.
@@ -2453,10 +2453,10 @@ which take an additional argument, the locale to use in conversion.
@section Old-fashioned System V number-to-string functions
The old @w{System V} C library provided three functions to convert
-numbers to strings, with unusual and hard-to-use semantics. The GNU C
-library also provides these functions and some natural extensions.
+numbers to strings, with unusual and hard-to-use semantics. @Theglibc{}
+also provides these functions and some natural extensions.
-These functions are only available in glibc and on systems descended
+These functions are only available in @theglibc{} and on systems descended
from AT&T Unix. Therefore, unless these functions do precisely what you
need, it is better to use @code{sprintf}, which is standard.
@@ -2516,7 +2516,7 @@ If @var{ndigit} decimal digits would exceed the precision of a
@code{double} it is reduced to a system-specific value.
@end deftypefun
-As extensions, the GNU C library provides versions of these three
+As extensions, @theglibc{} provides versions of these three
functions that take @code{long double} arguments.
@comment stdlib.h
@@ -2547,7 +2547,7 @@ restricted by the precision of a @code{long double}.
@cindex gcvt_r
The @code{ecvt} and @code{fcvt} functions, and their @code{long double}
equivalents, all return a string located in a static buffer which is
-overwritten by the next call to the function. The GNU C library
+overwritten by the next call to the function. @Theglibc{}
provides another set of extended functions which write the converted
string into a user-supplied buffer. These have the conventional
@code{_r} suffix.
diff --git a/manual/charset.texi b/manual/charset.texi
index d7d82ad006f..610db908586 100644
--- a/manual/charset.texi
+++ b/manual/charset.texi
@@ -361,7 +361,7 @@ the @code{LC_CTYPE} category of the current locale is used; see
The functions handling more than one character at a time require NUL
terminated strings as the argument (i.e., converting blocks of text
does not work unless one can add a NUL byte at an appropriate place).
-The GNU C library contains some extensions to the standard that allow
+@Theglibc{} contains some extensions to the standard that allow
specifying a size, but basically they also expect terminated strings.
@end itemize
@@ -418,7 +418,7 @@ a compile-time constant and is defined in @file{limits.h}.
maximum number of bytes in a multibyte character in the current locale.
The value is never greater than @code{MB_LEN_MAX}. Unlike
@code{MB_LEN_MAX} this macro need not be a compile-time constant, and in
-the GNU C library it is not.
+@theglibc{} it is not.
@pindex stdlib.h
@code{MB_CUR_MAX} is defined in @file{stdlib.h}.
@@ -793,7 +793,7 @@ character sequence but the one representing the NUL wide character.
Therefore, the @code{mbrlen} function will never read invalid memory.
Now that this function is available (just to make this clear, this
-function is @emph{not} part of the GNU C library) we can compute the
+function is @emph{not} part of @theglibc{}) we can compute the
number of wide character required to store the converted multibyte
character string @var{s} using
@@ -949,7 +949,7 @@ The functions described in the previous section only convert a single
character at a time. Most operations to be performed in real-world
programs include strings and therefore the @w{ISO C} standard also
defines conversions on entire strings. However, the defined set of
-functions is quite limited; therefore, the GNU C library contains a few
+functions is quite limited; therefore, @theglibc{} contains a few
extensions that can help in some important situations.
@comment wchar.h
@@ -1030,7 +1030,7 @@ therefore, should never be used in generally used code.
The generic conversion interface (@pxref{Generic Charset Conversion})
does not have this limitation (it simply works on buffers, not
-strings), and the GNU C library contains a set of functions that take
+strings), and @theglibc{} contains a set of functions that take
additional parameters specifying the maximal number of bytes that are
consumed from the input string. This way the problem of
@code{mbsrtowcs}'s example above could be solved by determining the line
@@ -1528,8 +1528,8 @@ The conversion functions mentioned so far in this chapter all had in
common that they operate on character sets that are not directly
specified by the functions. The multibyte encoding used is specified by
the currently selected locale for the @code{LC_CTYPE} category. The
-wide character set is fixed by the implementation (in the case of GNU C
-library it is always UCS-4 encoded @w{ISO 10646}.
+wide character set is fixed by the implementation (in the case of @theglibc{}
+it is always UCS-4 encoded @w{ISO 10646}.
This has of course several problems when it comes to general character
conversion:
@@ -1648,7 +1648,7 @@ An @code{iconv} descriptor is like a file descriptor as for every use a
new descriptor must be created. The descriptor does not stand for all
of the conversions from @var{fromset} to @var{toset}.
-The GNU C library implementation of @code{iconv_open} has one
+The @glibcadj{} implementation of @code{iconv_open} has one
significant extension to other implementations. To ease the extension
of the set of available conversions, the implementation allows storing
the necessary files with data and code in an arbitrary number of
@@ -1740,7 +1740,7 @@ from the initial state. It is important that the programmer never makes
any assumption as to whether the conversion has to deal with states.
Even if the input and output character sets are not stateful, the
implementation might still have to keep states. This is due to the
-implementation chosen for the GNU C library as it is described below.
+implementation chosen for @theglibc{} as it is described below.
Therefore an @code{iconv} call to reset the state should always be
performed if some protocol requires this for the output text.
@@ -1761,7 +1761,7 @@ Since the character sets selected in the @code{iconv_open} call can be
almost arbitrary, there can be situations where the input buffer contains
valid characters, which have no identical representation in the output
character set. The behavior in this situation is undefined. The
-@emph{current} behavior of the GNU C library in this situation is to
+@emph{current} behavior of @theglibc{} in this situation is to
return with an error immediately. This certainly is not the most
desirable solution; therefore, future versions will provide better ones,
but they are not yet finished.
@@ -1980,7 +1980,7 @@ the door open for extensions and improvements, but this design is also
limiting on some platforms since not many platforms support dynamic
loading in statically linked programs. On platforms without this
capability it is therefore not possible to use this interface in
-statically linked programs. The GNU C library has, on ELF platforms, no
+statically linked programs. @Theglibc{} has, on ELF platforms, no
problems with dynamic loading in these situations; therefore, this
point is moot. The danger is that one gets acquainted with this
situation and forgets about the restrictions on other systems.
@@ -2054,38 +2054,38 @@ such conversion, one could make sure this also is true for indirect
routes.
@node glibc iconv Implementation
-@subsection The @code{iconv} Implementation in the GNU C library
+@subsection The @code{iconv} Implementation in @theglibc{}
After reading about the problems of @code{iconv} implementations in the
last section it is certainly good to note that the implementation in
-the GNU C library has none of the problems mentioned above. What
+@theglibc{} has none of the problems mentioned above. What
follows is a step-by-step analysis of the points raised above. The
evaluation is based on the current state of the development (as of
January 1999). The development of the @code{iconv} functions is not
complete, but basic functionality has solidified.
-The GNU C library's @code{iconv} implementation uses shared loadable
+@Theglibc{}'s @code{iconv} implementation uses shared loadable
modules to implement the conversions. A very small number of
conversions are built into the library itself but these are only rather
trivial conversions.
-All the benefits of loadable modules are available in the GNU C library
+All the benefits of loadable modules are available in the @glibcadj{}
implementation. This is especially appealing since the interface is
well documented (see below), and it, therefore, is easy to write new
conversion modules. The drawback of using loadable objects is not a
-problem in the GNU C library, at least on ELF systems. Since the
+problem in @theglibc{}, at least on ELF systems. Since the
library is able to load shared objects even in statically linked
binaries, static linking need not be forbidden in case one wants to use
@code{iconv}.
The second mentioned problem is the number of supported conversions.
-Currently, the GNU C library supports more than 150 character sets. The
+Currently, @theglibc{} supports more than 150 character sets. The
way the implementation is designed the number of supported conversions
is greater than 22350 (@math{150} times @math{149}). If any conversion
from or to a character set is missing, it can be added easily.
Particularly impressive as it may be, this high number is due to the
-fact that the GNU C library implementation of @code{iconv} does not have
+fact that the @glibcadj{} implementation of @code{iconv} does not have
the third problem mentioned above (i.e., whenever there is a conversion
from a character set @math{@cal{A}} to @math{@cal{B}} and from
@math{@cal{B}} to @math{@cal{C}} it is always possible to convert from
@@ -2115,7 +2115,7 @@ the input to @w{ISO 10646} first. The two character sets of interest
are much more similar to each other than to @w{ISO 10646}.
In such a situation one easily can write a new conversion and provide it
-as a better alternative. The GNU C library @code{iconv} implementation
+as a better alternative. The @glibcadj{} @code{iconv} implementation
would automatically use the module implementing the conversion if it is
specified to be more efficient.
@@ -2207,7 +2207,7 @@ file, however, specifies that the new conversion modules can perform this
conversion with only the cost of @math{1}.
A mysterious item about the @file{gconv-modules} file above (and also
-the file coming with the GNU C library) are the names of the character
+the file coming with @theglibc{}) are the names of the character
sets specified in the @code{module} lines. Why do almost all the names
end in @code{//}? And this is not all: the names can actually be
regular expressions. At this point in time this mystery should not be
@@ -2423,7 +2423,7 @@ loads the objects with the conversions.
It is often the case that one conversion is used more than once (i.e.,
there are several @code{iconv_open} calls for the same set of character
sets during one program run). The @code{mbsrtowcs} et.al.@: functions in
-the GNU C library also use the @code{iconv} functionality, which
+@theglibc{} also use the @code{iconv} functionality, which
increases the number of uses of the same functions even more.
Because of this multiple use of conversions, the modules do not get
@@ -2888,8 +2888,8 @@ gconv (struct __gconv_step *step, struct __gconv_step_data *data,
@end deftypevr
This information should be sufficient to write new modules. Anybody
-doing so should also take a look at the available source code in the GNU
-C library sources. It contains many examples of working and optimized
+doing so should also take a look at the available source code in the
+@glibcadj{} sources. It contains many examples of working and optimized
modules.
@c File charset.texi edited October 2001 by Dennis Grace, IBM Corporation
diff --git a/manual/conf.texi b/manual/conf.texi
index 30499d9c65c..bc5b9282a74 100644
--- a/manual/conf.texi
+++ b/manual/conf.texi
@@ -147,7 +147,7 @@ should always be defined even if there is no specific imposed limit.
POSIX defines certain system-specific options that not all POSIX systems
support. Since these options are provided in the kernel, not in the
-library, simply using the GNU C library does not guarantee any of these
+library, simply using @theglibc{} does not guarantee any of these
features is supported; it depends on the system you are using.
@pindex unistd.h
@@ -190,7 +190,7 @@ to find out. @xref{Sysconf}.
@comment POSIX.2
@deftypevr Macro int _POSIX2_C_DEV
If this symbol is defined, it indicates that the system has the POSIX.2
-C compiler command, @code{c89}. The GNU C library always defines this
+C compiler command, @code{c89}. @Theglibc{} always defines this
as @code{1}, on the assumption that you would not have installed it if
you didn't have a C compiler.
@end deftypevr
@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ you didn't have a C compiler.
@comment POSIX.2
@deftypevr Macro int _POSIX2_FORT_DEV
If this symbol is defined, it indicates that the system has the POSIX.2
-Fortran compiler command, @code{fort77}. The GNU C library never
+Fortran compiler command, @code{fort77}. @Theglibc{} never
defines this, because we don't know what the system has.
@end deftypevr
@@ -207,15 +207,15 @@ defines this, because we don't know what the system has.
@comment POSIX.2
@deftypevr Macro int _POSIX2_FORT_RUN
If this symbol is defined, it indicates that the system has the POSIX.2
-@code{asa} command to interpret Fortran carriage control. The GNU C
-library never defines this, because we don't know what the system has.
+@code{asa} command to interpret Fortran carriage control. @Theglibc{}
+never defines this, because we don't know what the system has.
@end deftypevr
@comment unistd.h
@comment POSIX.2
@deftypevr Macro int _POSIX2_LOCALEDEF
If this symbol is defined, it indicates that the system has the POSIX.2
-@code{localedef} command. The GNU C library never defines this, because
+@code{localedef} command. @Theglibc{} never defines this, because
we don't know what the system has.
@end deftypevr
@@ -223,7 +223,7 @@ we don't know what the system has.
@comment POSIX.2
@deftypevr Macro int _POSIX2_SW_DEV
If this symbol is defined, it indicates that the system has the POSIX.2
-commands @code{ar}, @code{make}, and @code{strip}. The GNU C library
+commands @code{ar}, @code{make}, and @code{strip}. @Theglibc{}
always defines this as @code{1}, on the assumption that you had to have
@code{ar} and @code{make} to install the library, and it's unlikely that
@code{strip} would be absent when those are present.
@@ -728,7 +728,7 @@ utilities can handle.
@item _SC_EQUIV_CLASS_MAX
Inquire about the maximum number of weights that can be assigned to an
entry of the @code{LC_COLLATE} category @samp{order} keyword in a locale
-definition. The GNU C library does not presently support locale
+definition. @Theglibc{} does not presently support locale
definitions.
@comment unistd.h
@@ -1198,7 +1198,7 @@ that big! Use dynamic allocation (@pxref{Memory Allocation}) instead.
POSIX defines certain system-specific options in the system calls for
operating on files. Some systems support these options and others do
not. Since these options are provided in the kernel, not in the
-library, simply using the GNU C library does not guarantee that any of these
+library, simply using @theglibc{} does not guarantee that any of these
features is supported; it depends on the system you are using. They can
also vary between file systems on a single machine.
@@ -1210,11 +1210,10 @@ corresponding feature is supported. (A value of @code{-1} indicates no;
any other value indicates yes.) If the macro is undefined, it means
particular files may or may not support the feature.
-Since all the machines that support the GNU C library also support NFS,
+Since all the machines that support @theglibc{} also support NFS,
one can never make a general statement about whether all file systems
support the @code{_POSIX_CHOWN_RESTRICTED} and @code{_POSIX_NO_TRUNC}
-features. So these names are never defined as macros in the GNU C
-library.
+features. So these names are never defined as macros in @theglibc{}.
@comment unistd.h
@comment POSIX.1
@@ -1482,7 +1481,7 @@ The POSIX.2 standard specifies certain system limits that you can access
through @code{sysconf} that apply to utility behavior rather than the
behavior of the library or the operating system.
-The GNU C library defines macros for these limits, and @code{sysconf}
+@Theglibc{} defines macros for these limits, and @code{sysconf}
returns values for them if you ask; but these values convey no
meaningful information. They are simply the smallest values that
POSIX.2 permits.
@@ -1543,7 +1542,7 @@ memory, but there is no way that the library can tell you this.)
@deftypevr Macro int EQUIV_CLASS_MAX
The maximum number of weights that can be assigned to an entry of the
@code{LC_COLLATE} category @samp{order} keyword in a locale definition.
-The GNU C library does not presently support locale definitions.
+@Theglibc{} does not presently support locale definitions.
@end deftypevr
@node Utility Minimums
@@ -1601,7 +1600,7 @@ a text line that the text utilities can handle. Its value is
The most restrictive limit permitted by POSIX.2 for the maximum number
of weights that can be assigned to an entry of the @code{LC_COLLATE}
category @samp{order} keyword in a locale definition. Its value is
-@code{2}. The GNU C library does not presently support locale
+@code{2}. @Theglibc{} does not presently support locale
definitions.
@end table
diff --git a/manual/contrib.texi b/manual/contrib.texi
index 597635a1849..ed1065659e5 100644
--- a/manual/contrib.texi
+++ b/manual/contrib.texi
@@ -1,8 +1,8 @@
@node Contributors, Free Manuals, Maintenance, Top
-@c %MENU% Who wrote what parts of the GNU C library
-@appendix Contributors to the GNU C Library
+@c %MENU% Who wrote what parts of the GNU C Library
+@appendix Contributors to @theglibc{}
-The GNU C library was written originally by Roland McGrath, and is
+@Theglibc{} was written originally by Roland McGrath, and is
currently maintained by Ulrich Drepper. Some parts of the library were
contributed or worked on by other people.
@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ Roland McGrath, based on a backend interface defined by Peter Eriksson.
@item
The port to Linux i386/ELF (@code{i386-@var{anything}-linux}) was
contributed by Ulrich Drepper, based in large part on work done in
-Hongjiu Lu's Linux version of the GNU C Library.
+Hongjiu Lu's Linux version of @theglibc{}.
@item
The port to Linux/m68k (@code{m68k-@var{anything}-linux}) was
@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@ The random number generation functions @code{random}, @code{srandom},
@code{rand} and @code{srand} functions, were written by Earl T. Cohen
for the University of California at Berkeley and are copyrighted by the
Regents of the University of California. They have undergone minor
-changes to fit into the GNU C library and to fit the @w{ISO C} standard,
+changes to fit into @theglibc{} and to fit the @w{ISO C} standard,
but the functional code is Berkeley's.@refill
@item
diff --git a/manual/creature.texi b/manual/creature.texi
index 96501568a0b..cc09e33896a 100644
--- a/manual/creature.texi
+++ b/manual/creature.texi
@@ -1,5 +1,6 @@
@node Feature Test Macros
@subsection Feature Test Macros
+@include macros.texi
@cindex feature test macros
The exact set of features available when you compile a source file
@@ -65,7 +66,7 @@ then the functionality from the 1993 edition of the POSIX.1b standard
Greater values for @code{_POSIX_C_SOURCE} will enable future extensions.
The POSIX standards process will define these values as necessary, and
-the GNU C Library should support them some time after they become standardized.
+@theglibc{} should support them some time after they become standardized.
The 1996 edition of POSIX.1 (ISO/IEC 9945-1: 1996) states that
if you define @code{_POSIX_C_SOURCE} to a value greater than
or equal to @code{199506L}, then the functionality from the 1996
@@ -192,7 +193,7 @@ This macro was introduced as part of the Large File Support extension
@comment GNU
@defvr Macro _ISOC99_SOURCE
Until the revised @w{ISO C} standard is widely adopted the new features
-are not automatically enabled. The GNU libc nevertheless has a complete
+are not automatically enabled. @Theglibc{} nevertheless has a complete
implementation of the new standard and to enable the new features the
macro @code{_ISOC99_SOURCE} should be defined.
@end defvr
@@ -227,7 +228,7 @@ get very strange errors at run time.
@defvrx Macro _THREAD_SAFE
If you define one of these macros, reentrant versions of several functions get
declared. Some of the functions are specified in POSIX.1c but many others
-are only available on a few other systems or are unique to GNU libc.
+are only available on a few other systems or are unique to @theglibc{}.
The problem is the delay in the standardization of the thread safe C library
interface.
diff --git a/manual/crypt.texi b/manual/crypt.texi
index 0ea5ff85d42..ef905904ca8 100644
--- a/manual/crypt.texi
+++ b/manual/crypt.texi
@@ -23,7 +23,7 @@ through a @dfn{one-way function}, a function which makes it difficult to
work out what its input was by looking at its output, before storing in
the file.
-The GNU C library provides a one-way function that is compatible with
+@Theglibc{} provides a one-way function that is compatible with
the behavior of the @code{crypt} function introduced in FreeBSD 2.0.
It supports two one-way algorithms: one based on the MD5
message-digest algorithm that is compatible with modern BSD systems,
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ The terminal is flushed before and after @code{getpass}, so that
characters of a mistyped password are not accidentally visible.
In other C libraries, @code{getpass} may only return the first
-@code{PASS_MAX} bytes of a password. The GNU C library has no limit, so
+@code{PASS_MAX} bytes of a password. @Theglibc{} has no limit, so
@code{PASS_MAX} is undefined.
The prototype for this function is in @file{unistd.h}. @code{PASS_MAX}
diff --git a/manual/ctype.texi b/manual/ctype.texi
index b275a54c57b..3d13571ac21 100644
--- a/manual/ctype.texi
+++ b/manual/ctype.texi
@@ -273,7 +273,7 @@ The general design of the classification functions for wide characters
is more general. It allows extensions to the set of available
classifications, beyond those which are always available. The POSIX
standard specifies how extensions can be made, and this is already
-implemented in the GNU C library implementation of the @code{localedef}
+implemented in the @glibcadj{} implementation of the @code{localedef}
program.
The character class functions are normally implemented with bitsets,
@@ -589,7 +589,7 @@ iswctype (wc, wctype ("xdigit"))
It is declared in @file{wctype.h}.
@end deftypefun
-The GNU C library also provides a function which is not defined in the
+@Theglibc{} also provides a function which is not defined in the
@w{ISO C} standard but which is available as a version for single byte
characters as well.
@@ -607,7 +607,7 @@ It is declared in @file{wchar.h}.
The first note is probably not astonishing but still occasionally a
cause of problems. The @code{isw@var{XXX}} functions can be implemented
-using macros and in fact, the GNU C library does this. They are still
+using macros and in fact, @theglibc{} does this. They are still
available as real functions but when the @file{wctype.h} header is
included the macros will be used. This is the same as the
@code{char} type versions of these functions.
diff --git a/manual/errno.texi b/manual/errno.texi
index 868a28a59ff..f155db749f8 100644
--- a/manual/errno.texi
+++ b/manual/errno.texi
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@
@cindex error codes
@cindex status codes
-Many functions in the GNU C library detect and report error conditions,
+Many functions in @theglibc{} detect and report error conditions,
and sometimes your programs need to check for these error conditions.
For example, when you open an input file, you should verify that the
file was actually opened correctly, and print an error message or take
@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ function returns an error.
``modifiable lvalue'' rather than as a variable, permitting it to be
implemented as a macro. For example, its expansion might involve a
function call, like @w{@code{*_errno ()}}. In fact, that is what it is
-on the GNU system itself. The GNU library, on non-GNU systems, does
+on the GNU system itself. @Theglibc{}, on non-GNU systems, does
whatever is right for the particular system.
There are a few library functions, like @code{sqrt} and @code{atan},
@@ -114,8 +114,8 @@ allocated memory instead of stack memory on that system.
@pindex errno.h
The error code macros are defined in the header file @file{errno.h}.
All of them expand into integer constant values. Some of these error
-codes can't occur on the GNU system, but they can occur using the GNU
-library on other systems.
+codes can't occur on the GNU system, but they can occur using @theglibc{}
+on other systems.
@comment errno.h
@comment POSIX.1: Operation not permitted
@@ -419,7 +419,7 @@ not representable because of overflow or underflow.
@comment errno 35 @c DO NOT REMOVE
Resource temporarily unavailable; the call might work if you try again
later. The macro @code{EWOULDBLOCK} is another name for @code{EAGAIN};
-they are always the same in the GNU C library.
+they are always the same in @theglibc{}.
This error can happen in a few different situations:
@@ -452,7 +452,7 @@ and return to its command loop.
@comment BSD: Operation would block
@deftypevr Macro int EWOULDBLOCK
@comment errno EAGAIN @c DO NOT REMOVE
-In the GNU C library, this is another name for @code{EAGAIN} (above).
+In @theglibc{}, this is another name for @code{EAGAIN} (above).
The values are always the same, on every operating system.
C libraries in many older Unix systems have @code{EWOULDBLOCK} as a
@@ -1572,7 +1572,7 @@ like this:
@code{error} and @code{error_at_line} are clearly the functions of
choice and enable the programmer to write applications which follow the
-GNU coding standard. The GNU libc additionally contains functions which
+GNU coding standard. @Theglibc{} additionally contains functions which
are used in BSD for the same purpose. These functions are declared in
@file{err.h}. It is generally advised to not use these functions. They
are included only for compatibility.
diff --git a/manual/filesys.texi b/manual/filesys.texi
index 049e7e01b5a..bf3abb44474 100644
--- a/manual/filesys.texi
+++ b/manual/filesys.texi
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
@c %MENU% Functions for manipulating files
@chapter File System Interface
-This chapter describes the GNU C library's functions for manipulating
+This chapter describes @theglibc{}'s functions for manipulating
files. Unlike the input and output functions (@pxref{I/O on Streams};
@pxref{Low-Level I/O}), these functions are concerned with operating
on the files themselves rather than on their contents.
@@ -63,7 +63,7 @@ the current working directory, storing it in the character array
@var{buffer} that you provide. The @var{size} argument is how you tell
the system the allocation size of @var{buffer}.
-The GNU library version of this function also permits you to specify a
+The @glibcadj{} version of this function also permits you to specify a
null pointer for the @var{buffer} argument. Then @code{getcwd}
allocates a buffer automatically, as with @code{malloc}
(@pxref{Unconstrained Allocation}). If the @var{size} is greater than
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ software.
@comment BSD
@deftypefn {Deprecated Function} {char *} getwd (char *@var{buffer})
This is similar to @code{getcwd}, but has no way to specify the size of
-the buffer. The GNU library provides @code{getwd} only
+the buffer. @Theglibc{} provides @code{getwd} only
for backwards compatibility with BSD.
The @var{buffer} argument should be a pointer to an array at least
@@ -413,7 +413,7 @@ descriptor which is created by the @code{opendir} call. For instance,
to switch the current working directory to the directory just read the
@code{fchdir} function could be used. Historically the @code{DIR} type
was exposed and programs could access the fields. This does not happen
-in the GNU C library. Instead a separate function is provided to allow
+in @theglibc{}. Instead a separate function is provided to allow
access.
@comment dirent.h
@@ -634,7 +634,7 @@ the global variable @code{errno} contains more information on the error.
As described above the fourth argument to the @code{scandir} function
must be a pointer to a sorting function. For the convenience of the
-programmer the GNU C library contains implementations of functions which
+programmer @theglibc{} contains implementations of functions which
are very helpful for this purpose.
@comment dirent.h
@@ -3035,7 +3035,7 @@ set the real size of the file.
@cindex special files
The @code{mknod} function is the primitive for making special files,
-such as files that correspond to devices. The GNU library includes
+such as files that correspond to devices. @Theglibc{} includes
this function for compatibility with BSD.
The prototype for @code{mknod} is declared in @file{sys/stat.h}.
@@ -3176,7 +3176,7 @@ you can create with @code{tmpnam}. You can rely on being able to call
@code{tmpnam} at least this many times before it might fail saying you
have made too many temporary file names.
-With the GNU library, you can create a very large number of temporary
+With @theglibc{}, you can create a very large number of temporary
file names. If you actually created the files, you would probably run
out of disk space before you ran out of names. Some other systems have
a fixed, small limit on the number of temporary files. The limit is
diff --git a/manual/header.texi b/manual/header.texi
index 7a4cb058fc7..2a551cd6e12 100644
--- a/manual/header.texi
+++ b/manual/header.texi
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
@appendix Summary of Library Facilities
This appendix is a complete list of the facilities declared within the
-header files supplied with the GNU C library. Each entry also lists the
+header files supplied with @theglibc{}. Each entry also lists the
standard or other source from which each facility is derived, and tells
you where in the manual you can find more information about how to use
it.
diff --git a/manual/install.texi b/manual/install.texi
index a525cf01c36..f633b4d2aca 100644
--- a/manual/install.texi
+++ b/manual/install.texi
@@ -1,17 +1,18 @@
@c This is for making the `INSTALL' file for the distribution.
@c Makeinfo ignores it when processing the file from the include.
@setfilename INSTALL
+@include macros.texi
@node Installation, Maintenance, Library Summary, Top
-@c %MENU% How to install the GNU C library
-@appendix Installing the GNU C Library
+@c %MENU% How to install the GNU C Library
+@appendix Installing @theglibc{}
Before you do anything else, you should read the file @file{FAQ} located
at the top level of the source tree. This file answers common questions
and describes problems you may experience with compilation and
installation. It is updated more frequently than this manual.
-Features can be added to GNU Libc via @dfn{add-on} bundles. These are
+Features can be added to @theglibc{} via @dfn{add-on} bundles. These are
separate tar files, which you unpack into the top level of the source
tree. Then you give @code{configure} the @samp{--enable-add-ons} option
to activate them, and they will be compiled into the library.
@@ -29,13 +30,14 @@ GNU Make, and possibly others. @xref{Tools for Compilation}, below.
@end menu
@node Configuring and compiling
-@appendixsec Configuring and compiling GNU Libc
+@appendixsec Configuring and compiling @theglibc{}
@cindex configuring
@cindex compiling
-GNU libc cannot be compiled in the source directory. You must build
+@Theglibc{} cannot be compiled in the source directory. You must build
it in a separate build directory. For example, if you have unpacked
-the glibc sources in @file{/src/gnu/glibc-@var{version}}, create a directory
+the @glibcadj{} sources in @file{/src/gnu/glibc-@var{version}},
+create a directory
@file{/src/gnu/glibc-build} to put the object files in. This allows
removing the whole build directory in case an error occurs, which is
the safest way to get a fresh start and should always be done.
@@ -54,7 +56,7 @@ directory, especially some files in the manual subdirectory.
@noindent
@code{configure} takes many options, but the only one that is usually
mandatory is @samp{--prefix}. This option tells @code{configure}
-where you want glibc installed. This defaults to @file{/usr/local},
+where you want @theglibc{} installed. This defaults to @file{/usr/local},
but the normal setting to install as the standard system library is
@samp{--prefix=/usr} for GNU/Linux systems and @samp{--prefix=} (an
empty prefix) for GNU/Hurd systems.
@@ -79,15 +81,15 @@ directory if that option is specified, or @file{/usr/local} otherwise.
@item --with-headers=@var{directory}
Look for kernel header files in @var{directory}, not
-@file{/usr/include}. Glibc needs information from the kernel's header
-files describing the interface to the kernel. Glibc will normally
+@file{/usr/include}. @Theglibc{} needs information from the kernel's header
+files describing the interface to the kernel. @Theglibc{} will normally
look in @file{/usr/include} for them,
but if you specify this option, it will look in @var{DIRECTORY} instead.
This option is primarily of use on a system where the headers in
-@file{/usr/include} come from an older version of glibc. Conflicts can
+@file{/usr/include} come from an older version of @theglibc{}. Conflicts can
occasionally happen in this case. You can also use this option if you want to
-compile glibc with a newer set of kernel headers than the ones found in
+compile @theglibc{} with a newer set of kernel headers than the ones found in
@file{/usr/include}.
@item --enable-add-ons[=@var{list}]
@@ -112,7 +114,7 @@ compatibility code is added, and the faster the code gets.
Use the binutils (assembler and linker) in @file{@var{directory}}, not
the ones the C compiler would default to. You can use this option if
the default binutils on your system cannot deal with all the constructs
-in the GNU C library. In that case, @code{configure} will detect the
+in @theglibc{}. In that case, @code{configure} will detect the
problem and suppress these constructs, so that the library will still be
usable, but functionality may be lost---for example, you can't build a
shared libc with old binutils.
@@ -156,7 +158,7 @@ compatibility problems.
@itemx --host=@var{host-system}
These options are for cross-compiling. If you specify both options and
@var{build-system} is different from @var{host-system}, @code{configure}
-will prepare to cross-compile glibc from @var{build-system} to be used
+will prepare to cross-compile @theglibc{} from @var{build-system} to be used
on @var{host-system}. You'll probably need the @samp{--with-headers}
option too, and you may have to override @var{configure}'s selection of
the compiler and/or binutils.
@@ -193,7 +195,7 @@ successfully, do not use the built library, and report a bug after
verifying that the problem is not already known. @xref{Reporting Bugs},
for instructions on reporting bugs. Note that some of the tests assume
they are not being run by @code{root}. We recommend you compile and
-test glibc as an unprivileged user.
+test @theglibc{} as an unprivileged user.
Before reporting bugs make sure there is no problem with your system.
The tests (and later installation) use some pre-existing files of the
@@ -213,7 +215,7 @@ the file @file{configparms}. To change them, create a
for your system. The file is included and parsed by @code{make} and has
to follow the conventions for makefiles.
-It is easy to configure the GNU C library for cross-compilation by
+It is easy to configure @theglibc{} for cross-compilation by
setting a few variables in @file{configparms}. Set @code{CC} to the
cross-compiler for the target you configured the library for; it is
important to use this same @code{CC} value when running
@@ -232,13 +234,14 @@ object files for the target you configured for.
To install the library and its header files, and the Info files of the
manual, type @code{env LANGUAGE=C LC_ALL=C make install}. This will
build things, if necessary, before installing them; however, you should
-still compile everything first. If you are installing glibc as your
+still compile everything first. If you are installing @theglibc{} as your
primary C library, we recommend that you shut the system down to
single-user mode first, and reboot afterward. This minimizes the risk
of breaking things when the library changes out from underneath.
@samp{make install} will do the entire job of upgrading from a
-previous installation of glibc 2.x. There may sometimes be headers
+previous installation of @theglibc{} version 2.x. There may sometimes
+be headers
left behind from the previous installation, but those are generally
harmless. If you want to avoid leaving headers behind you can do
things in the following order.
@@ -252,17 +255,17 @@ library requires the ability to compile and run programs against the old
library. The new @file{/usr/include}, after switching the include
directories and before installing the library should contain the Linux
headers, but nothing else. If you do this, you will need to restore
-any headers from non-glibc libraries youself after installing the
+any headers from libraries other than @theglibc{} yourself after installing the
library.
-You can install glibc somewhere other than where you configured it to go
+You can install @theglibc{} somewhere other than where you configured it to go
by setting the @code{install_root} variable on the command line for
@samp{make install}. The value of this variable is prepended to all the
paths for installation. This is useful when setting up a chroot
environment or preparing a binary distribution. The directory should be
specified with an absolute file name.
-Glibc includes a daemon called @code{nscd}, which you
+@Theglibc{} includes a daemon called @code{nscd}, which you
may or may not want to run. @code{nscd} caches name service lookups; it
can dramatically improve performance with NIS+, and may help with DNS as
well.
@@ -278,11 +281,11 @@ providing pty slaves, you don't need this program; otherwise you do.
The source for @file{pt_chown} is in @file{login/programs/pt_chown.c}.
After installation you might want to configure the timezone and locale
-installation of your system. The GNU C library comes with a locale
+installation of your system. @Theglibc{} comes with a locale
database which gets configured with @code{localedef}. For example, to
set up a German locale with name @code{de_DE}, simply issue the command
@samp{localedef -i de_DE -f ISO-8859-1 de_DE}. To configure all locales
-that are supported by glibc, you can issue from your build directory the
+that are supported by @theglibc{}, you can issue from your build directory the
command @samp{make localedata/install-locales}.
To configure the locally used timezone, set the @code{TZ} environment
@@ -300,14 +303,14 @@ timezone file which is in @file{/usr/share/zoneinfo} to the file
@cindex tools, for installing library
We recommend installing the following GNU tools before attempting to
-build the GNU C library:
+build @theglibc{}:
@itemize @bullet
@item
GNU @code{make} 3.79 or newer
-You need the latest version of GNU @code{make}. Modifying the GNU C
-Library to work with other @code{make} programs would be so difficult that
+You need the latest version of GNU @code{make}. Modifying @theglibc{}
+to work with other @code{make} programs would be so difficult that
we recommend you port GNU @code{make} instead. @strong{Really.} We
recommend GNU @code{make} version 3.79. All earlier versions have severe
bugs or lack features.
@@ -316,17 +319,17 @@ bugs or lack features.
GCC 4.3 or newer, GCC 4.6 recommended
GCC 4.3 or higher is required; as of this writing, GCC 4.6 is the
-compiler we advise to use to build the GNU C library.
+compiler we advise to use to build @theglibc{}.
-You can use whatever compiler you like to compile programs that use GNU
-libc.
+You can use whatever compiler you like to compile programs that use
+@theglibc{}.
Check the FAQ for any special compiler issues on particular platforms.
@item
GNU @code{binutils} 2.15 or later
-You must use GNU @code{binutils} (as and ld) to build the GNU C library.
+You must use GNU @code{binutils} (as and ld) to build @theglibc{}.
No other assembler or linker has the necessary functionality at the
moment.
@@ -386,41 +389,41 @@ patches, although we try to avoid this.
@appendixsec Specific advice for GNU/Linux systems
@cindex kernel header files
-If you are installing GNU libc on a GNU/Linux system, you need to have
+If you are installing @theglibc{} on a GNU/Linux system, you need to have
the header files from a 2.6.19.1 or newer kernel around for reference.
These headers must be installed using @samp{make headers_install}; the
headers present in the kernel source directory are not suitable for
-direct use by GNU libc. You do not need to use that kernel, just have
-its headers installed where glibc can access them, referred to here as
+direct use by @theglibc{}. You do not need to use that kernel, just have
+its headers installed where @theglibc{} can access them, referred to here as
@var{install-directory}. The easiest way to do this is to unpack it
in a directory such as @file{/usr/src/linux-@var{version}}. In that
directory, run @samp{make headers_install
-INSTALL_HDR_PATH=@var{install-directory}}. Finally, configure glibc
+INSTALL_HDR_PATH=@var{install-directory}}. Finally, configure @theglibc{}
with the option @samp{--with-headers=@var{install-directory}/include}.
Use the most recent kernel you can get your hands on. (If you are
-cross-compiling GNU libc, you need to specify
+cross-compiling @theglibc{}, you need to specify
@samp{ARCH=@var{architecture}} in the @samp{make headers_install}
command, where @var{architecture} is the architecture name used by the
Linux kernel, such as @samp{x86} or @samp{powerpc}.)
-After installing GNU libc, you may need to remove or rename
+After installing @theglibc{}, you may need to remove or rename
directories such as @file{/usr/include/linux} and
@file{/usr/include/asm}, and replace them with copies of directories
such as @file{linux} and @file{asm} from
@file{@var{install-directory}/include}. All directories present in
@file{@var{install-directory}/include} should be copied, except that
-GNU libc provides its own version of @file{/usr/include/scsi}; the
+@theglibc{} provides its own version of @file{/usr/include/scsi}; the
files provided by the kernel should be copied without replacing those
-provided by GNU libc. The @file{linux}, @file{asm} and
+provided by @theglibc{}. The @file{linux}, @file{asm} and
@file{asm-generic} directories are required to compile programs using
-GNU libc; the other directories describe interfaces to the kernel but
+@theglibc{}; the other directories describe interfaces to the kernel but
are not required if not compiling programs using those interfaces.
You do not need to copy kernel headers if you did not specify an
alternate kernel header source using @samp{--with-headers}.
-GNU/Linux expects some components of the libc installation to be in
+GNU/Linux expects some components of the @glibcadj{} installation to be in
@file{/lib} and some in @file{/usr/lib}. This is handled automatically
-if you configure glibc with @samp{--prefix=/usr}. If you set some other
+if you configure @theglibc{} with @samp{--prefix=/usr}. If you set some other
prefix or allow it to default to @file{/usr/local}, then all the
components are installed there.
@@ -434,7 +437,7 @@ program.
@cindex reporting bugs
@cindex bugs, reporting
-There are probably bugs in the GNU C library. There are certainly
+There are probably bugs in @theglibc{}. There are certainly
errors and omissions in this manual. If you report them, they will get
fixed. If you don't, no one will ever know about them and they will
remain unfixed for all eternity, if not longer.
@@ -449,14 +452,14 @@ normally includes a patch or a hint on solving the problem.
To report a bug, first you must find it. With any luck, this will be the
hard part. Once you've found a bug, make sure it's really a bug. A
-good way to do this is to see if the GNU C library behaves the same way
+good way to do this is to see if @theglibc{} behaves the same way
some other C library does. If so, probably you are wrong and the
libraries are right (but not necessarily). If not, one of the libraries
-is probably wrong. It might not be the GNU library. Many historical
+is probably wrong. It might not be @theglibc{}. Many historical
Unix C libraries permit things that we don't, such as closing a file
twice.
-If you think you have found some way in which the GNU C library does not
+If you think you have found some way in which @theglibc{} does not
conform to the ISO and POSIX standards (@pxref{Standards and
Portability}), that is definitely a bug. Report it!
diff --git a/manual/intro.texi b/manual/intro.texi
index d97e262356c..bfe30d76e03 100644
--- a/manual/intro.texi
+++ b/manual/intro.texi
@@ -9,13 +9,13 @@ in a standard @dfn{library}, which you compile and link with your
programs.
@cindex library
-The GNU C library, described in this document, defines all of the
+@Theglibc{}, described in this document, defines all of the
library functions that are specified by the @w{ISO C} standard, as well as
additional features specific to POSIX and other derivatives of the Unix
operating system, and extensions specific to the GNU system.
The purpose of this manual is to tell you how to use the facilities
-of the GNU library. We have mentioned which features belong to which
+of @theglibc{}. We have mentioned which features belong to which
standards to help you identify things that are potentially non-portable
to other systems. But the emphasis in this manual is not on strict
portability.
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ concepts. Specifically, familiarity with ISO standard C
(@pxref{ISO C}), rather than ``traditional'' pre-ISO C dialects, is
assumed.
-The GNU C library includes several @dfn{header files}, each of which
+@Theglibc{} includes several @dfn{header files}, each of which
provides definitions and declarations for a group of related facilities;
this information is used by the C compiler when processing your program.
For example, the header file @file{stdio.h} declares facilities for
@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ generally follows the same division as the header files.
If you are reading this manual for the first time, you should read all
of the introductory material and skim the remaining chapters. There are
-a @emph{lot} of functions in the GNU C library and it's not realistic to
+a @emph{lot} of functions in @theglibc{} and it's not realistic to
expect that you will be able to remember exactly @emph{how} to use each
and every one of them. It's more important to become generally familiar
with the kinds of facilities that the library provides, so that when you
@@ -61,12 +61,12 @@ specific information about them.
@section Standards and Portability
@cindex standards
-This section discusses the various standards and other sources that the
-GNU C library is based upon. These sources include the @w{ISO C} and
+This section discusses the various standards and other sources that @theglibc{}
+is based upon. These sources include the @w{ISO C} and
POSIX standards, and the System V and Berkeley Unix implementations.
The primary focus of this manual is to tell you how to make effective
-use of the GNU library facilities. But if you are concerned about
+use of the @glibcadj{} facilities. But if you are concerned about
making your programs compatible with these standards, or portable to
operating systems other than GNU, this can affect how you use the
library. This section gives you an overview of these standards, so that
@@ -91,14 +91,14 @@ standards each function or symbol comes from.
@subsection ISO C
@cindex ISO C
-The GNU C library is compatible with the C standard adopted by the
+@Theglibc{} is compatible with the C standard adopted by the
American National Standards Institute (ANSI):
@cite{American National Standard X3.159-1989---``ANSI C''} and later
by the International Standardization Organization (ISO):
@cite{ISO/IEC 9899:1990, ``Programming languages---C''}.
We here refer to the standard as @w{ISO C} since this is the more
general standard in respect of ratification.
-The header files and library facilities that make up the GNU library are
+The header files and library facilities that make up @theglibc{} are
a superset of those specified by the @w{ISO C} standard.@refill
@pindex gcc
@@ -131,7 +131,7 @@ not aim for completeness.
@cindex IEEE Std 1003.2
@cindex ISO/IEC 9945-2
-The GNU library is also compatible with the ISO @dfn{POSIX} family of
+@Theglibc{} is also compatible with the ISO @dfn{POSIX} family of
standards, known more formally as the @dfn{Portable Operating System
Interface for Computer Environments} (ISO/IEC 9945). They were also
published as ANSI/IEEE Std 1003. POSIX is derived mostly from various
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ particular kind of operating system environment, rather than general
programming language support which can run in many diverse operating
system environments.@refill
-The GNU C library implements all of the functions specified in
+@Theglibc{} implements all of the functions specified in
@cite{ISO/IEC 9945-1:1996, the POSIX System Application Program
Interface}, commonly referred to as POSIX.1. The primary extensions to
the @w{ISO C} facilities specified by this standard include file system
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ terminal control functions (@pxref{Low-Level Terminal Interface}), and
process control functions (@pxref{Processes}).
Some facilities from @cite{ISO/IEC 9945-2:1993, the POSIX Shell and
-Utilities standard} (POSIX.2) are also implemented in the GNU library.
+Utilities standard} (POSIX.2) are also implemented in @theglibc{}.
These include utilities for dealing with regular expressions and other
pattern matching facilities (@pxref{Pattern Matching}).
@@ -181,7 +181,7 @@ pattern matching facilities (@pxref{Pattern Matching}).
@cindex SunOS
@cindex Unix, Berkeley
-The GNU C library defines facilities from some versions of Unix which
+@Theglibc{} defines facilities from some versions of Unix which
are not formally standardized, specifically from the 4.2 BSD, 4.3 BSD,
and 4.4 BSD Unix systems (also known as @dfn{Berkeley Unix}) and from
@dfn{SunOS} (a popular 4.2 BSD derivative that includes some Unix System
@@ -202,7 +202,7 @@ The @dfn{System V Interface Description} (SVID) is a document describing
the AT&T Unix System V operating system. It is to some extent a
superset of the POSIX standard (@pxref{POSIX}).
-The GNU C library defines most of the facilities required by the SVID
+@Theglibc{} defines most of the facilities required by the SVID
that are not also required by the @w{ISO C} or POSIX standards, for
compatibility with System V Unix and other Unix systems (such as
SunOS) which include these facilities. However, many of the more
@@ -222,7 +222,7 @@ a more general standard than POSIX. X/Open owns the Unix copyright and
the XPG specifies the requirements for systems which are intended to be
a Unix system.
-The GNU C library complies to the X/Open Portability Guide, Issue 4.2,
+@Theglibc{} complies to the X/Open Portability Guide, Issue 4.2,
with all extensions common to XSI (X/Open System Interface)
compliant systems and also all X/Open UNIX extensions.
@@ -238,7 +238,7 @@ functionality is available on commercial systems.
@section Using the Library
This section describes some of the practical issues involved in using
-the GNU C library.
+@theglibc{}.
@menu
* Header Files:: How to include the header files in your
@@ -269,7 +269,7 @@ variable or says what a function does.)
@cindex definition (compared to declaration)
@cindex declaration (compared to definition)
-In order to use the facilities in the GNU C library, you should be sure
+In order to use the facilities in @theglibc{}, you should be sure
that your program source files include the appropriate header files.
This is so that the compiler has declarations of these facilities
available and can correctly process references to them. Once your
@@ -310,7 +310,7 @@ For more information about the use of header files and @samp{#include}
directives, @pxref{Header Files,,, cpp.info, The GNU C Preprocessor
Manual}.@refill
-The GNU C library provides several header files, each of which contains
+@Theglibc{} provides several header files, each of which contains
the type and macro definitions and variable and function declarations
for a group of related facilities. This means that your programs may
need to include several header files, depending on exactly which
@@ -319,8 +319,8 @@ facilities you are using.
Some library header files include other library header files
automatically. However, as a matter of programming style, you should
not rely on this; it is better to explicitly include all the header
-files required for the library facilities you are using. The GNU C
-library header files have been written in such a way that it doesn't
+files required for the library facilities you are using. The @glibcadj{}
+header files have been written in such a way that it doesn't
matter if a header file is accidentally included more than once;
including a header file a second time has no effect. Likewise, if your
program needs to include multiple header files, the order in which they
@@ -572,7 +572,7 @@ debugging mechanism which allows you to put assertions in your code, and
have diagnostic messages printed if the tests fail.
@item
-@ref{Memory}, describes the GNU library's facilities for managing and
+@ref{Memory}, describes @theglibc{}'s facilities for managing and
using virtual and real memory, including dynamic allocation of virtual
memory. If you do not know in advance how much memory your program
needs, you can allocate it dynamically instead, and manipulate it via
@@ -714,7 +714,7 @@ macros in the library, with complete data types and function prototypes,
and says what standard or system each is derived from.
@item
-@ref{Installation}, explains how to build and install the GNU C library on
+@ref{Installation}, explains how to build and install @theglibc{} on
your system, and how to report any bugs you might find.
@item
diff --git a/manual/io.texi b/manual/io.texi
index f839138f375..0286fa4bf94 100644
--- a/manual/io.texi
+++ b/manual/io.texi
@@ -3,8 +3,8 @@
@chapter Input/Output Overview
Most programs need to do either input (reading data) or output (writing
-data), or most frequently both, in order to do anything useful. The GNU
-C library provides such a large selection of input and output functions
+data), or most frequently both, in order to do anything useful. @Theglibc{}
+provides such a large selection of input and output functions
that the hardest part is often deciding which function is most
appropriate!
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ closed a stream or file descriptor, you cannot do any more input or
output operations on it.
@menu
-* Streams and File Descriptors:: The GNU Library provides two ways
+* Streams and File Descriptors:: The GNU C Library provides two ways
to access the contents of files.
* File Position:: The number of bytes from the
beginning of the file.
@@ -123,8 +123,8 @@ than GNU, you should also be aware that file descriptors are not as
portable as streams. You can expect any system running @w{ISO C} to
support streams, but non-GNU systems may not support file descriptors at
all, or may only implement a subset of the GNU functions that operate on
-file descriptors. Most of the file descriptor functions in the GNU
-library are included in the POSIX.1 standard, however.
+file descriptors. Most of the file descriptor functions in @theglibc{}
+are included in the POSIX.1 standard, however.
@node File Position, , Streams and File Descriptors, I/O Concepts
@subsection File Position
@@ -236,7 +236,7 @@ in @ref{File System Interface}.
@subsection File Name Resolution
A file name consists of file name components separated by slash
-(@samp{/}) characters. On the systems that the GNU C library supports,
+(@samp{/}) characters. On the systems that @theglibc{} supports,
multiple successive @samp{/} characters are equivalent to a single
@samp{/} character.
diff --git a/manual/job.texi b/manual/job.texi
index fbc7ace2c20..cd16c6c74e3 100644
--- a/manual/job.texi
+++ b/manual/job.texi
@@ -107,7 +107,7 @@ controlling terminal,
@cindex job control is optional
Not all operating systems support job control. The GNU system does
-support job control, but if you are using the GNU library on some other
+support job control, but if you are using @theglibc{} on some other
system, that system may not support job control itself.
You can use the @code{_POSIX_JOB_CONTROL} macro to test at compile-time
@@ -1026,7 +1026,7 @@ to job control.
@cindex controlling terminal, determining
You can use the @code{ctermid} function to get a file name that you can
-use to open the controlling terminal. In the GNU library, it returns
+use to open the controlling terminal. In @theglibc{}, it returns
the same string all the time: @code{"/dev/tty"}. That is a special
``magic'' file name that refers to the controlling terminal of the
current process (if it has one). To find the name of the specific
diff --git a/manual/lang.texi b/manual/lang.texi
index b93ad5b5e83..2a73c723b4f 100644
--- a/manual/lang.texi
+++ b/manual/lang.texi
@@ -454,7 +454,7 @@ This ends the use of @var{ap}. After a @code{va_end} call, further
@code{va_end} before returning from the function in which @code{va_start}
was invoked with the same @var{ap} argument.
-In the GNU C library, @code{va_end} does nothing, and you need not ever
+In @theglibc{}, @code{va_end} does nothing, and you need not ever
use it except for reasons of portability.
@refill
@end deftypefn
@@ -776,7 +776,7 @@ It's equal to @code{SCHAR_MAX} if @code{char} is signed, or
@item SHRT_MIN
This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed
-short int}}. On most machines that the GNU C library runs on,
+short int}}. On most machines that @theglibc{} runs on,
@code{short} integers are 16-bit quantities.
@comment limits.h
@@ -795,7 +795,7 @@ respectively.
@item INT_MIN
This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed
-int}}. On most machines that the GNU C system runs on, an @code{int} is
+int}}. On most machines that @theglibc{} runs on, an @code{int} is
a 32-bit quantity.
@comment limits.h
@@ -813,7 +813,7 @@ the type @w{@code{signed int}} and the type @w{@code{unsigned int}}.
@item LONG_MIN
This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed
-long int}}. On most machines that the GNU C system runs on, @code{long}
+long int}}. On most machines that @theglibc{} runs on, @code{long}
integers are 32-bit quantities, the same size as @code{int}.
@comment limits.h
@@ -831,7 +831,7 @@ These are the maximum values that can be represented by a
@item LLONG_MIN
This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed
-long long int}}. On most machines that the GNU C system runs on,
+long long int}}. On most machines that @theglibc{} runs on,
@w{@code{long long}} integers are 64-bit quantities.
@comment limits.h
@@ -939,8 +939,8 @@ Sometimes, in the actual bits representing the floating point number,
the exponent is @dfn{biased} by adding a constant to it, to make it
always be represented as an unsigned quantity. This is only important
if you have some reason to pick apart the bit fields making up the
-floating point number by hand, which is something for which the GNU
-library provides no support. So this is ignored in the discussion that
+floating point number by hand, which is something for which @theglibc{}
+provides no support. So this is ignored in the discussion that
follows.
@item
@@ -961,7 +961,7 @@ the mantissa. This is a bit which is present virtually in the mantissa,
but not stored in memory because its value is always 1 in a normalized
number. The precision figure (see above) includes any hidden bits.
-Again, the GNU library provides no facilities for dealing with such
+Again, @theglibc{} provides no facilities for dealing with such
low-level aspects of the representation.
@end itemize
diff --git a/manual/libc.texinfo b/manual/libc.texinfo
index f1c4301ee7a..2c1344ac845 100644
--- a/manual/libc.texinfo
+++ b/manual/libc.texinfo
@@ -4,6 +4,8 @@
@settitle The GNU C Library
@c setchapternewpage odd
+@include macros.texi
+
@comment Tell install-info what to do.
@dircategory Software libraries
@direntry
@@ -29,7 +31,7 @@
@set FDL_VERSION 1.3
@copying
-This file documents the GNU C library.
+This file documents @theglibc{}.
This is
@c Disabled (printed editions, see above).
@@ -94,7 +96,7 @@ This is
@c Disabled (printed editions, see above).
@c Edition @value{EDITION} of
@cite{The GNU C Library Reference Manual}, for Version @value{VERSION}
-of the GNU C Library.
+of @theglibc{}.
@end ifnottex
@include top-menu.texi
diff --git a/manual/llio.texi b/manual/llio.texi
index 281d1e02d5a..9fa0908f2de 100644
--- a/manual/llio.texi
+++ b/manual/llio.texi
@@ -332,7 +332,7 @@ some input. But if the @code{O_NONBLOCK} flag is set for the file
reading any data, and reports this error.
@strong{Compatibility Note:} Most versions of BSD Unix use a different
-error code for this: @code{EWOULDBLOCK}. In the GNU library,
+error code for this: @code{EWOULDBLOCK}. In @theglibc{},
@code{EWOULDBLOCK} is an alias for @code{EAGAIN}, so it doesn't matter
which name you use.
@@ -483,7 +483,7 @@ flow control, where output has been suspended by receipt of a STOP
character.
@strong{Compatibility Note:} Most versions of BSD Unix use a different
-error code for this: @code{EWOULDBLOCK}. In the GNU library,
+error code for this: @code{EWOULDBLOCK}. In @theglibc{},
@code{EWOULDBLOCK} is an alias for @code{EAGAIN}, so it doesn't matter
which name you use.
@@ -844,7 +844,7 @@ null pointer is returned instead.
In some other systems, @code{fdopen} may fail to detect that the modes
for file descriptor do not permit the access specified by
-@code{opentype}. The GNU C library always checks for this.
+@code{opentype}. @Theglibc{} always checks for this.
@end deftypefun
For an example showing the use of the @code{fdopen} function,
@@ -1043,8 +1043,8 @@ with multiple calls to @code{read} and @code{write}, it is inefficient
because there is overhead associated with each kernel call.
Instead, many platforms provide special high-speed primitives to perform
-these @dfn{scatter-gather} operations in a single kernel call. The GNU C
-library will provide an emulation on any system that lacks these
+these @dfn{scatter-gather} operations in a single kernel call. @Theglibc{}
+will provide an emulation on any system that lacks these
primitives, so they are not a portability threat. They are defined in
@code{sys/uio.h}.
@@ -1216,7 +1216,7 @@ systems. They are also useful to share data between multiple tasks
without creating a file.
On some systems using private anonymous mmaps is more efficient than using
-@code{malloc} for large blocks. This is not an issue with the GNU C library,
+@code{malloc} for large blocks. This is not an issue with @theglibc{},
as the included @code{malloc} automatically uses @code{mmap} where appropriate.
@c Linux has some other MAP_ options, which I have not discussed here.
@@ -2498,7 +2498,7 @@ At the point of this writing, the available implementation is a userlevel
implementation which uses threads for handling the enqueued requests.
While this implementation requires making some decisions about
limitations, hard limitations are something which is best avoided
-in the GNU C library. Therefore, the GNU C library provides a means
+in @theglibc{}. Therefore, @theglibc{} provides a means
for tuning the AIO implementation according to the individual use.
@comment aio.h
diff --git a/manual/locale.texi b/manual/locale.texi
index 23ad8bcdb32..2f10fcd2af7 100644
--- a/manual/locale.texi
+++ b/manual/locale.texi
@@ -350,8 +350,8 @@ The empty name says to select a locale based on environment variables.
@end table
Defining and installing named locales is normally a responsibility of
-the system administrator at your site (or the person who installed the
-GNU C library). It is also possible for the user to create private
+the system administrator at your site (or the person who installed
+@theglibc{}). It is also possible for the user to create private
locales. All this will be discussed later when describing the tool to
do so.
@comment (@pxref{Building Locale Files}).
@@ -889,7 +889,7 @@ The same as the value returned by @code{localeconv} in the
@item YESEXPR
The return value is a regular expression which can be used with the
@code{regex} function to recognize a positive response to a yes/no
-question. The GNU C library provides the @code{rpmatch} function for
+question. @Theglibc{} provides the @code{rpmatch} function for
easier handling in applications.
@item NOEXPR
The return value is a regular expression which can be used with the
@@ -1048,7 +1048,7 @@ than given by the field width, the displayed value is rounded. If the
number of fractional digits is selected to be zero, no decimal point is
printed.
-As a GNU extension, the @code{strfmon} implementation in the GNU libc
+As a GNU extension, the @code{strfmon} implementation in @theglibc{}
allows an optional @samp{L} next as a format modifier. If this modifier
is given, the argument is expected to be a @code{long double} instead of
a @code{double} value.
@@ -1179,7 +1179,7 @@ sure that you localize the answers too. It would be very bad habit to
ask a question in one language and request the answer in another, often
English.
-The GNU C library contains @code{rpmatch} to give applications easy
+@Theglibc{} contains @code{rpmatch} to give applications easy
access to the corresponding locale definitions.
@comment GNU
@@ -1203,7 +1203,7 @@ The answer matched neither the @code{YESEXPR} nor the @code{NOEXPR}
regular expression.
@end table
-This function is not standardized but available beside in GNU libc at
+This function is not standardized but available beside in @theglibc{} at
least also in the IBM AIX library.
@end deftypefun
diff --git a/manual/macros.texi b/manual/macros.texi
new file mode 100644
index 00000000000..c9b73d3c560
--- /dev/null
+++ b/manual/macros.texi
@@ -0,0 +1,20 @@
+@c Define common macros used to keep phrasing consistent in the manual.
+
+@ifclear MACROS
+@set MACROS
+
+@c Names used to refer to the library, as noun phrases at the start or
+@c not at the start of a sentence.
+@macro Theglibc
+The GNU C Library
+@end macro
+@macro theglibc
+the GNU C Library
+@end macro
+
+@c Name used to refer to the library as an adjective.
+@macro glibcadj
+GNU C Library
+@end macro
+
+@end ifclear
diff --git a/manual/maint.texi b/manual/maint.texi
index 567db981a30..0c2ed5923ec 100644
--- a/manual/maint.texi
+++ b/manual/maint.texi
@@ -4,8 +4,8 @@
@menu
* Source Layout:: How to add new functions or header files
- to the GNU C library.
-* Porting:: How to port the GNU C library to
+ to the GNU C Library.
+* Porting:: How to port the GNU C Library to
a new machine or operating system.
@end menu
@@ -105,9 +105,9 @@ This variable is used for secondary object files needed to build
@end table
@node Porting
-@appendixsec Porting the GNU C Library
+@appendixsec Porting @theglibc{}
-The GNU C library is written to be easily portable to a variety of
+@Theglibc{} is written to be easily portable to a variety of
machines and operating systems. Machine- and operating system-dependent
functions are well separated to make it easy to add implementations for
new machines or operating systems. This section describes the layout of
@@ -405,7 +405,7 @@ the @file{sysdeps} hierarchy, parallel to @file{unix} and @file{mach}.
@end table
@node Porting to Unix
-@appendixsubsec Porting the GNU C Library to Unix Systems
+@appendixsubsec Porting @theglibc{} to Unix Systems
Most Unix systems are fundamentally very similar. There are variations
between different machines, and variations in what facilities are
@@ -452,10 +452,10 @@ generated are @file{ioctls.h}, @file{errnos.h}, @file{sys/param.h}, and
@c It's not anymore true. glibc 2.1 cannot be used with K&R compilers.
@c --drepper
-Although the GNU C library implements the @w{ISO C} library facilities, you
-@emph{can} use the GNU C library with traditional, ``pre-ISO'' C
+Although @theglibc{} implements the @w{ISO C} library facilities, you
+@emph{can} use @theglibc{} with traditional, ``pre-ISO'' C
compilers. However, you need to be careful because the content and
-organization of the GNU C library header files differs from that of
+organization of the @glibcadj{} header files differs from that of
traditional C implementations. This means you may need to make changes
to your program in order to get it to compile.
@end ignore
diff --git a/manual/math.texi b/manual/math.texi
index 01e258f4151..9242b539adf 100644
--- a/manual/math.texi
+++ b/manual/math.texi
@@ -111,8 +111,8 @@ These constants come from the Unix98 standard and were also available in
defined. The default set of features includes these constants.
@xref{Feature Test Macros}.
-All values are of type @code{double}. As an extension, the GNU C
-library also defines these constants with type @code{long double}. The
+All values are of type @code{double}. As an extension, @theglibc{}
+also defines these constants with type @code{long double}. The
@code{long double} macros have a lowercase @samp{l} appended to their
names: @code{M_El}, @code{M_PIl}, and so forth. These are only
available if @code{_GNU_SOURCE} is defined.
@@ -121,7 +121,7 @@ available if @code{_GNU_SOURCE} is defined.
@emph{Note:} Some programs use a constant named @code{PI} which has the
same value as @code{M_PI}. This constant is not standard; it may have
appeared in some old AT&T headers, and is mentioned in Stroustrup's book
-on C++. It infringes on the user's name space, so the GNU C library
+on C++. It infringes on the user's name space, so @theglibc{}
does not define it. Fixing programs written to expect it is simple:
replace @code{PI} with @code{M_PI} throughout, or put @samp{-DPI=M_PI}
on the compiler command line.
@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@ to cope with its absence.
@cindex complex trigonometric functions
@w{ISO C99} defines variants of the trig functions which work on
-complex numbers. The GNU C library provides these functions, but they
+complex numbers. @Theglibc{} provides these functions, but they
are only useful if your compiler supports the new complex types defined
by the standard.
@c XXX Change this when gcc is fixed. -zw
@@ -1275,7 +1275,7 @@ generator. There is no standard meaning for a particular seed value;
the same seed, used in different C libraries or on different CPU types,
will give you different random numbers.
-The GNU library supports the standard @w{ISO C} random number functions
+@Theglibc{} supports the standard @w{ISO C} random number functions
plus two other sets derived from BSD and SVID. The BSD and @w{ISO C}
functions provide identical, somewhat limited functionality. If only a
small number of random bits are required, we recommend you use the
@@ -1306,7 +1306,7 @@ To use these facilities, you should include the header file
@comment ISO
@deftypevr Macro int RAND_MAX
The value of this macro is an integer constant representing the largest
-value the @code{rand} function can return. In the GNU library, it is
+value the @code{rand} function can return. In @theglibc{}, it is
@code{2147483647}, which is the largest signed integer representable in
32 bits. In other libraries, it may be as low as @code{32767}.
@end deftypevr
@@ -1355,7 +1355,7 @@ available.
This section describes a set of random number generation functions that
are derived from BSD. There is no advantage to using these functions
-with the GNU C library; we support them for BSD compatibility only.
+with @theglibc{}; we support them for BSD compatibility only.
The prototypes for these functions are in @file{stdlib.h}.
@pindex stdlib.h
@@ -1419,7 +1419,7 @@ the user and can only be modified by these functions. This makes it
hard to deal with situations where each thread should have its own
pseudo-random number generator.
-The GNU C library contains four additional functions which contain the
+@Theglibc{} contains four additional functions which contain the
state as an explicit parameter and therefore make it possible to handle
thread-local PRNGs. Beside this there is no difference. In fact, the
four functions already discussed are implemented internally using the
@@ -1824,7 +1824,7 @@ that the cost of the function calls themselves is not negligible.
Modern processors can often execute the operations themselves
very fast, but the function call disrupts the instruction pipeline.
-For this reason the GNU C Library provides optimizations for many of the
+For this reason @theglibc{} provides optimizations for many of the
frequently-used math functions. When GNU CC is used and the user
activates the optimizer, several new inline functions and macros are
defined. These new functions and macros have the same names as the
diff --git a/manual/memory.texi b/manual/memory.texi
index da1656c8680..ce32af066ba 100644
--- a/manual/memory.texi
+++ b/manual/memory.texi
@@ -5,9 +5,9 @@
@cindex storage allocation
This chapter describes how processes manage and use memory in a system
-that uses the GNU C library.
+that uses @theglibc{}.
-The GNU C Library has several functions for dynamically allocating
+@Theglibc{} has several functions for dynamically allocating
virtual memory in various ways. They vary in generality and in
efficiency. The library also provides functions for controlling paging
and allocation of real memory.
@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ just a flag saying it is all zeroes.
The same frame of real memory or backing store can back multiple virtual
pages belonging to multiple processes. This is normally the case, for
-example, with virtual memory occupied by GNU C library code. The same
+example, with virtual memory occupied by @glibcadj{} code. The same
real memory frame containing the @code{printf} function backs a virtual
memory page in each of the existing processes that has a @code{printf}
call in its program.
@@ -100,7 +100,7 @@ Allocation and C}).
@cindex constants
Once that program begins to execute, it uses programmatic allocation to
-gain additional memory. In a C program with the GNU C library, there
+gain additional memory. In a C program with @theglibc{}, there
are two kinds of programmatic allocation: automatic and dynamic.
@xref{Memory Allocation and C}.
@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@ grows, but doesn't shrink when the stack shrinks.
This section covers how ordinary programs manage storage for their data,
including the famous @code{malloc} function and some fancier facilities
-special the GNU C library and GNU Compiler.
+special @theglibc{} and GNU Compiler.
@menu
* Memory Allocation and C:: How to get different kinds of allocation in C.
@@ -202,7 +202,7 @@ that varies. In other C implementations, it must be a constant.
@end itemize
A third important kind of memory allocation, @dfn{dynamic allocation},
-is not supported by C variables but is available via GNU C library
+is not supported by C variables but is available via @glibcadj{}
functions.
@cindex dynamic memory allocation
@@ -234,8 +234,8 @@ as you want.
Dynamic allocation is not supported by C variables; there is no storage
class ``dynamic'', and there can never be a C variable whose value is
stored in dynamically allocated space. The only way to get dynamically
-allocated memory is via a system call (which is generally via a GNU C
-library function call), and the only way to refer to dynamically
+allocated memory is via a system call (which is generally via a @glibcadj{}
+function call), and the only way to refer to dynamically
allocated space is through a pointer. Because it is less convenient,
and because the actual process of dynamic allocation requires more
computation time, programmers generally use dynamic allocation only when
@@ -591,7 +591,7 @@ more time to minimize the wasted space.
@end ignore
-As opposed to other versions, the @code{malloc} in the GNU C Library
+As opposed to other versions, the @code{malloc} in @theglibc{}
does not round up block sizes to powers of two, neither for large nor
for small sizes. Neighboring chunks can be coalesced on a @code{free}
no matter what their size is. This makes the implementation suitable
@@ -620,7 +620,7 @@ power of two than that, use @code{memalign}, @code{posix_memalign}, or
@code{valloc}. @code{memalign} is declared in @file{malloc.h} and
@code{posix_memalign} is declared in @file{stdlib.h}.
-With the GNU library, you can use @code{free} to free the blocks that
+With @theglibc{}, you can use @code{free} to free the blocks that
@code{memalign}, @code{posix_memalign}, and @code{valloc} return. That
does not work in BSD, however---BSD does not provide any way to free
such blocks.
@@ -834,7 +834,7 @@ recompile your application.
@subsubsection Memory Allocation Hooks
@cindex allocation hooks, for @code{malloc}
-The GNU C library lets you modify the behavior of @code{malloc},
+@Theglibc{} lets you modify the behavior of @code{malloc},
@code{realloc}, and @code{free} by specifying appropriate hook
functions. You can use these hooks to help you debug programs that use
dynamic memory allocation, for example.
@@ -1149,7 +1149,7 @@ Long running programs must assure that dynamically allocated objects are
freed at the end of their lifetime. If this does not happen the system
runs out of memory, sooner or later.
-The @code{malloc} implementation in the GNU C library provides some
+The @code{malloc} implementation in @theglibc{} provides some
simple means to detect such leaks and obtain some information to find
the location. To do this the application must be started in a special
mode which is enabled by an environment variable. There are no speed
@@ -1313,8 +1313,8 @@ If you take a look at the output it will look similar to this:
What this all means is not really important since the trace file is not
meant to be read by a human. Therefore no attention is given to
-readability. Instead there is a program which comes with the GNU C
-library which interprets the traces and outputs a summary in an
+readability. Instead there is a program which comes with @theglibc{}
+which interprets the traces and outputs a summary in an
user-friendly way. The program is called @code{mtrace} (it is in fact a
Perl script) and it takes one or two arguments. In any case the name of
the file with the trace output must be specified. If an optional
@@ -2344,7 +2344,7 @@ The symbols in this section are declared in @file{unistd.h}.
You will not normally use the functions in this section, because the
functions described in @ref{Memory Allocation} are easier to use. Those
-are interfaces to a GNU C Library memory allocator that uses the
+are interfaces to a @glibcadj{} memory allocator that uses the
functions below itself. The functions below are simple interfaces to
system calls.
@@ -2526,7 +2526,7 @@ define the macro @code{_POSIX_MEMLOCK_RANGE} and the file
@code{limits.h} define the macro @code{PAGESIZE} to be the size of a
memory page in bytes. It requires that when the @code{mlockall} and
@code{munlockall} functions are available, the @file{unistd.h} file
-define the macro @code{_POSIX_MEMLOCK}. The GNU C library conforms to
+define the macro @code{_POSIX_MEMLOCK}. @Theglibc{} conforms to
this requirement.
@comment sys/mman.h
diff --git a/manual/message.texi b/manual/message.texi
index e44545a311a..3fc6d249f01 100644
--- a/manual/message.texi
+++ b/manual/message.texi
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ A better solution is to keep the message sets for each language are kept
in separate files which are loaded at runtime depending on the language
selection of the user.
-The GNU C Library provides two different sets of functions to support
+@Theglibc{} provides two different sets of functions to support
message translation. The problem is that neither of the interfaces is
officially defined by the POSIX standard. The @code{catgets} family of
functions is defined in the X/Open standard but this is derived from
@@ -170,8 +170,8 @@ is
@end smallexample
@noindent
-where @var{prefix} is given to @code{configure} while installing the GNU
-C Library (this value is in many cases @code{/usr} or the empty string).
+where @var{prefix} is given to @code{configure} while installing @theglibc{}
+(this value is in many cases @code{/usr} or the empty string).
The remaining problem is to decide which must be used. The value
decides about the substitution of the format elements mentioned above.
@@ -439,11 +439,11 @@ detail in the next section.
Files in this other format are not human readable. To be easy to use by
programs it is a binary file. But the format is byte order independent
so translation files can be shared by systems of arbitrary architecture
-(as long as they use the GNU C Library).
+(as long as they use @theglibc{}).
Details about the binary file format are not important to know since
these files are always created by the @code{gencat} program. The
-sources of the GNU C Library also provide the sources for the
+sources of @theglibc{} also provide the sources for the
@code{gencat} program and so the interested reader can look through
these source files to learn about the file format.
@@ -730,11 +730,10 @@ translation in the Uniforum group. There never was a real standard
defined but still the interface was used in Sun's operation systems.
Since this approach fits better in the development process of free
software it is also used throughout the GNU project and the GNU
-@file{gettext} package provides support for this outside the GNU C
-Library.
+@file{gettext} package provides support for this outside @theglibc{}.
The code of the @file{libintl} from GNU @file{gettext} is the same as
-the code in the GNU C Library. So the documentation in the GNU
+the code in @theglibc{}. So the documentation in the GNU
@file{gettext} manual is also valid for the functionality here. The
following text will describe the library functions in detail. But the
numerous helper programs are not described in this manual. Instead
@@ -982,7 +981,7 @@ As the functions described in the last sections already mention separate
sets of messages can be selected by a @dfn{domain name}. This is a
simple string which should be unique for each program part with uses a
separate domain. It is possible to use in one program arbitrary many
-domains at the same time. E.g., the GNU C Library itself uses a domain
+domains at the same time. E.g., @theglibc{} itself uses a domain
named @code{libc} while the program using the C Library could use a
domain named @code{foo}. The important point is that at any time
exactly one domain is active. This is controlled with the following
@@ -1128,7 +1127,7 @@ form, the second the plural form.
This has the consequence that programs without language catalogs can
display the correct strings only if the program itself is written using
-a Germanic language. This is a limitation but since the GNU C library
+a Germanic language. This is a limitation but since @theglibc{}
(as well as the GNU @code{gettext} package) are written as part of the
GNU package and the coding standards for the GNU project require program
being written in English, this solution nevertheless fulfills its
@@ -1552,7 +1551,7 @@ functions as well which look almost identical, except for the parameters
and the call to the underlying function.
Now there is of course the question why such functions do not exist in
-the GNU C library? There are two parts of the answer to this question.
+@theglibc{}? There are two parts of the answer to this question.
@itemize @bullet
@item
@@ -1666,8 +1665,8 @@ The @var{domain_name} part is the name which was either registered using
the @code{textdomain} function or which was given to @code{dgettext} or
@code{dcgettext} as the first parameter. Now it becomes obvious that a
good choice for the domain name in the program code is a string which is
-closely related to the program/package name. E.g., for the GNU C
-Library the domain name is @code{libc}.
+closely related to the program/package name. E.g., for @theglibc{}
+the domain name is @code{libc}.
@noindent
A limit piece of example code should show how the programmer is supposed
@@ -1787,7 +1786,7 @@ different character sets the user has to be careful.
@node Helper programs for gettext
@subsection Programs to handle message catalogs for @code{gettext}
-The GNU C Library does not contain the source code for the programs to
+@Theglibc{} does not contain the source code for the programs to
handle message catalogs for the @code{gettext} functions. As part of
the GNU project the GNU gettext package contains everything the
developer needs. The functionality provided by the tools in this
diff --git a/manual/nss.texi b/manual/nss.texi
index 962758329be..29fa4cc8d99 100644
--- a/manual/nss.texi
+++ b/manual/nss.texi
@@ -12,9 +12,9 @@ Network Information Service (NIS) and the Domain Name Service (DNS))
became popular, and were hacked into the C library, usually with a fixed
search order (@pxref{frobnicate, , ,jargon, The Jargon File}).
-The GNU C Library contains a cleaner solution of this problem. It is
+@Theglibc{} contains a cleaner solution of this problem. It is
designed after a method used by Sun Microsystems in the C library of
-@w{Solaris 2}. GNU C Library follows their name and calls this
+@w{Solaris 2}. @Theglibc{} follows their name and calls this
scheme @dfn{Name Service Switch} (NSS).
Though the interface might be similar to Sun's version there is no
@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ advantages:
@enumerate
@item
-Contributors can add new services without adding them to GNU C Library.
+Contributors can add new services without adding them to @theglibc{}.
@item
The modules can be updated separately.
@item
@@ -364,7 +364,7 @@ system @file{nss_files.so.2}. This is the difference mentioned above.
Sun's NSS modules are usable as modules which get indirectly loaded
only.
-The NSS modules in the GNU C Library are prepared to be used as normal
+The NSS modules in @theglibc{} are prepared to be used as normal
libraries themselves. This is @emph{not} true at the moment, though.
However, the organization of the name space in the modules does not make it
impossible like it is for Solaris. Now you can see why the modules are
@@ -528,8 +528,8 @@ completely aside).
@node Adding another Service to NSS, NSS Module Function Internals, Extending NSS, Extending NSS
@subsection Adding another Service to NSS
-The sources for a new service need not (and should not) be part of the
-GNU C Library itself. The developer retains complete control over the
+The sources for a new service need not (and should not) be part of @theglibc{}
+itself. The developer retains complete control over the
sources and its development. The links between the C library and the
new service module consists solely of the interface functions.
diff --git a/manual/pattern.texi b/manual/pattern.texi
index c2a42cd843b..48eba75cd44 100644
--- a/manual/pattern.texi
+++ b/manual/pattern.texi
@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
@c %MENU% Matching shell ``globs'' and regular expressions
@chapter Pattern Matching
-The GNU C Library provides pattern matching facilities for two kinds of
+@Theglibc{} provides pattern matching facilities for two kinds of
patterns: regular expressions and file-name wildcards. The library also
provides a facility for expanding variable and command references and
parsing text into words in the way the shell does.
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ returns the nonzero value @code{FNM_NOMATCH}. The arguments
The argument @var{flags} is a combination of flag bits that alter the
details of matching. See below for a list of the defined flags.
-In the GNU C Library, @code{fnmatch} cannot experience an ``error''---it
+In @theglibc{}, @code{fnmatch} cannot experience an ``error''---it
always returns an answer for whether the match succeeds. However, other
implementations of @code{fnmatch} might sometimes report ``errors''.
They would do so by returning nonzero values that are not equal to
@@ -668,7 +668,7 @@ type @code{glob64_t} which were allocated by @code{glob64}.
@node Regular Expressions
@section Regular Expression Matching
-The GNU C library supports two interfaces for matching regular
+@Theglibc{} supports two interfaces for matching regular
expressions. One is the standard POSIX.2 interface, and the other is
what the GNU system has had for many years.
diff --git a/manual/process.texi b/manual/process.texi
index 53d467c1c3a..45d3ed45b9b 100644
--- a/manual/process.texi
+++ b/manual/process.texi
@@ -55,8 +55,8 @@ until the subprogram terminates before you can do anything else.
@comment ISO
@deftypefun int system (const char *@var{command})
@pindex sh
-This function executes @var{command} as a shell command. In the GNU C
-library, it always uses the default shell @code{sh} to run the command.
+This function executes @var{command} as a shell command. In @theglibc{},
+it always uses the default shell @code{sh} to run the command.
In particular, it searches the directories in @code{PATH} to find
programs to execute. The return value is @code{-1} if it wasn't
possible to create the shell process, and otherwise is the status of the
@@ -151,7 +151,7 @@ program should include the header files @file{unistd.h} and
@comment POSIX.1
@deftp {Data Type} pid_t
The @code{pid_t} data type is a signed integer type which is capable
-of representing a process ID. In the GNU library, this is an @code{int}.
+of representing a process ID. In @theglibc{}, this is an @code{int}.
@end deftp
@comment unistd.h
@@ -260,8 +260,8 @@ do a long jump out of) the function that called @code{vfork}! This
would leave the parent process's control information very confused. If
in doubt, use @code{fork} instead.
-Some operating systems don't really implement @code{vfork}. The GNU C
-library permits you to use @code{vfork} on all systems, but actually
+Some operating systems don't really implement @code{vfork}. @Theglibc{}
+permits you to use @code{vfork} on all systems, but actually
executes @code{fork} if @code{vfork} isn't available. If you follow
the proper precautions for using @code{vfork}, your program will still
work even if the system uses @code{fork} instead.
@@ -694,11 +694,11 @@ signal number of the signal that caused the child process to stop.
@node BSD Wait Functions
@section BSD Process Wait Functions
-The GNU library also provides these related facilities for compatibility
+@Theglibc{} also provides these related facilities for compatibility
with BSD Unix. BSD uses the @code{union wait} data type to represent
status values rather than an @code{int}. The two representations are
-actually interchangeable; they describe the same bit patterns. The GNU
-C Library defines macros such as @code{WEXITSTATUS} so that they will
+actually interchangeable; they describe the same bit patterns. @Theglibc{}
+defines macros such as @code{WEXITSTATUS} so that they will
work on either kind of object, and the @code{wait} function is defined
to accept either type of pointer as its @var{status-ptr} argument.
diff --git a/manual/resource.texi b/manual/resource.texi
index 173ed41e7e3..1e2fcaf9581 100644
--- a/manual/resource.texi
+++ b/manual/resource.texi
@@ -522,7 +522,7 @@ The process tried to set its current limit beyond its maximum limit.
When multiple processes simultaneously require CPU time, the system's
scheduling policy and process CPU priorities determine which processes
get it. This section describes how that determination is made and
-GNU C library functions to control it.
+@glibcadj{} functions to control it.
It is common to refer to CPU scheduling simply as scheduling and a
process' CPU priority simply as the process' priority, with the CPU
@@ -537,7 +537,7 @@ CPU scheduling is a complex issue and different systems do it in wildly
different ways. New ideas continually develop and find their way into
the intricacies of the various systems' scheduling algorithms. This
section discusses the general concepts, some specifics of systems
-that commonly use the GNU C library, and some standards.
+that commonly use @theglibc{}, and some standards.
For simplicity, we talk about CPU contention as if there is only one CPU
in the system. But all the same principles apply when a processor has
@@ -746,7 +746,7 @@ that has absolute priority higher than 0.
@node Basic Scheduling Functions
@subsection Basic Scheduling Functions
-This section describes functions in the GNU C library for setting the
+This section describes functions in @theglibc{} for setting the
absolute priority and scheduling policy of a process.
@strong{Portability Note:} On systems that have the functions in this
@@ -759,7 +759,7 @@ functions to fine tune the scheduling are in @ref{Traditional Scheduling}.
Don't try to make too much out of the naming and structure of these
functions. They don't match the concepts described in this manual
because the functions are as defined by POSIX.1b, but the implementation
-on systems that use the GNU C library is the inverse of what the POSIX
+on systems that use @theglibc{} is the inverse of what the POSIX
structure contemplates. The POSIX scheme assumes that the primary
scheduling parameter is the scheduling policy and that the priority
value, if any, is a parameter of the scheduling policy. In the
@@ -1107,7 +1107,7 @@ other process owned by the same user (or effective user). But only a
privileged process can lower its nice value. A privileged process can
also raise or lower another process' nice value.
-GNU C Library functions for getting and setting nice values are described in
+@glibcadj{} functions for getting and setting nice values are described in
@xref{Traditional Scheduling Functions}.
@node Traditional Scheduling Functions
@@ -1289,7 +1289,7 @@ The POSIX standard up to this date is of not much help to solve this
problem. The Linux kernel provides a set of interfaces to allow
specifying @emph{affinity sets} for a process. The scheduler will
schedule the thread or process on CPUs specified by the affinity
-masks. The interfaces which the GNU C library define follow to some
+masks. The interfaces which @theglibc{} define follow to some
extend the Linux kernel interface.
@comment sched.h
@@ -1554,7 +1554,7 @@ increases its memory usage). The value returned for
If all applications together constantly use more than that amount of
memory the system is in trouble.
-The GNU C library provides in addition to these already described way to
+@Theglibc{} provides in addition to these already described way to
get this information two functions. They are declared in the file
@file{sys/sysinfo.h}. Programmers should prefer to use the
@code{sysconf} method described above.
@@ -1610,7 +1610,7 @@ processors and so the call
returns the number of processors which are currently online (i.e.,
available).
-For these two pieces of information the GNU C library also provides
+For these two pieces of information @theglibc{} also provides
functions to get the information directly. The functions are declared
in @file{sys/sysinfo.h}.
diff --git a/manual/search.texi b/manual/search.texi
index 0afd0aecd06..498832bdd96 100644
--- a/manual/search.texi
+++ b/manual/search.texi
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ int comparison_fn_t (const void *, const void *);
@cindex array search function
Generally searching for a specific element in an array means that
-potentially all elements must be checked. The GNU C library contains
+potentially all elements must be checked. @Theglibc{} contains
functions to perform linear search. The prototypes for the following
two functions can be found in @file{search.h}.
@@ -269,8 +269,8 @@ information.
The weakest aspect of this function is that there can be at most one
hashing table used through the whole program. The table is allocated
-in local memory out of control of the programmer. As an extension the
-GNU C library provides an additional set of functions with an reentrant
+in local memory out of control of the programmer. As an extension @theglibc{}
+provides an additional set of functions with an reentrant
interface which provide a similar interface but which allow to keep
arbitrarily many hashing tables.
@@ -417,7 +417,7 @@ Another common form to organize data for efficient search is to use
trees. The @code{tsearch} function family provides a nice interface to
functions to organize possibly large amounts of data by providing a mean
access time proportional to the logarithm of the number of elements.
-The GNU C library implementation even guarantees that this bound is
+@Theglibc{} implementation even guarantees that this bound is
never exceeded even for input data which cause problems for simple
binary tree implementations.
diff --git a/manual/setjmp.texi b/manual/setjmp.texi
index 0cf8b84905b..cc76352553b 100644
--- a/manual/setjmp.texi
+++ b/manual/setjmp.texi
@@ -180,7 +180,7 @@ change the set of blocked signals, and provides an additional pair of
functions (@code{sigsetjmp} and @code{siglongjmp}) to get the BSD
behavior.
-The behavior of @code{setjmp} and @code{longjmp} in the GNU library is
+The behavior of @code{setjmp} and @code{longjmp} in @theglibc{} is
controlled by feature test macros; see @ref{Feature Test Macros}. The
default in the GNU system is the POSIX.1 behavior rather than the BSD
behavior.
@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ and these functions are more powerful than those discussed in this
chapter so far. These function were part of the original @w{System V}
API and by this route were added to the Unix API. Beside on branded
Unix implementations these interfaces are not widely available. Not all
-platforms and/or architectures the GNU C Library is available on provide
+platforms and/or architectures @theglibc{} is available on provide
this interface. Use @file{configure} to detect the availability.
Similar to the @code{jmp_buf} and @code{sigjmp_buf} types used for the
@@ -325,7 +325,7 @@ execution using (@pxref{Memory-mapped I/O}).
@strong{Compatibility note}: The current Unix standard is very imprecise
about the way the stack is allocated. All implementations seem to agree
that the @code{uc_stack} element must be used but the values stored in
-the elements of the @code{stack_t} value are unclear. The GNU C library
+the elements of the @code{stack_t} value are unclear. @Theglibc{}
and most other Unix implementations require the @code{ss_sp} value of
the @code{uc_stack} element to point to the base of the memory region
allocated for the stack and the size of the memory region is stored in
diff --git a/manual/signal.texi b/manual/signal.texi
index 2fa525426f9..9d5e26ce3d8 100644
--- a/manual/signal.texi
+++ b/manual/signal.texi
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ executing program. Some signals report errors such as references to
invalid memory addresses; others report asynchronous events, such as
disconnection of a phone line.
-The GNU C library defines a variety of signal types, each for a
+@Theglibc{} defines a variety of signal types, each for a
particular kind of event. Some kinds of events make it inadvisable or
impossible for the program to proceed as usual, and the corresponding
signals normally abort the program. Other kinds of signals that report
@@ -307,7 +307,7 @@ BSD systems provide the @code{SIGFPE} handler with an extra argument
that distinguishes various causes of the exception. In order to access
this argument, you must define the handler to accept two arguments,
which means you must cast it to a one-argument function type in order to
-establish the handler. The GNU library does provide this extra
+establish the handler. @Theglibc{} does provide this extra
argument, but the value is meaningful only on operating systems that
provide the information (BSD systems and GNU systems).
@@ -933,7 +933,7 @@ The simplest way to change the action for a signal is to use the
@code{signal} function. You can specify a built-in action (such as to
ignore the signal), or you can @dfn{establish a handler}.
-The GNU library also implements the more versatile @code{sigaction}
+@Theglibc{} also implements the more versatile @code{sigaction}
facility. This section describes both facilities and gives suggestions
on which to use when.
@@ -1044,7 +1044,7 @@ a handler for @code{SIGKILL} or @code{SIGSTOP}.
@code{signal} function is that it has different semantics on BSD and
SVID systems. The difference is that on SVID systems the signal handler
is deinstalled after signal delivery. On BSD systems the
-handler must be explicitly deinstalled. In the GNU C Library we use the
+handler must be explicitly deinstalled. In @theglibc{} we use the
BSD version by default. To use the SVID version you can either use the
function @code{sysv_signal} (see below) or use the @code{_XOPEN_SOURCE}
feature select macro (@pxref{Feature Test Macros}). In general, use of these
@@ -1320,7 +1320,7 @@ Each signal number has its own set of flags. Each call to
@code{sigaction} affects one particular signal number, and the flags
that you specify apply only to that particular signal.
-In the GNU C library, establishing a handler with @code{signal} sets all
+In @theglibc{}, establishing a handler with @code{signal} sets all
the flags to zero except for @code{SA_RESTART}, whose value depends on
the settings you have made with @code{siginterrupt}. @xref{Interrupted
Primitives}, to see what this is about.
@@ -2032,7 +2032,7 @@ atomically.
In practice, you can assume that @code{int} is atomic.
You can also assume that pointer
types are atomic; that is very convenient. Both of these assumptions
-are true on all of the machines that the GNU C library supports and on
+are true on all of the machines that @theglibc{} supports and on
all POSIX systems we know of.
@c ??? This might fail on a 386 that uses 64-bit pointers.
@@ -2077,7 +2077,7 @@ handlers must check for @code{EINTR} after each library function that
can return it, in order to try the call again. Often programmers forget
to check, which is a common source of error.
-The GNU library provides a convenient way to retry a call after a
+@Theglibc{} provides a convenient way to retry a call after a
temporary failure, with the macro @code{TEMP_FAILURE_RETRY}:
@comment unistd.h
@@ -2099,7 +2099,7 @@ approach: to restart the interrupted primitive, instead of making it
fail. If you choose this approach, you need not be concerned with
@code{EINTR}.
-You can choose either approach with the GNU library. If you use
+You can choose either approach with @theglibc{}. If you use
@code{sigaction} to establish a signal handler, you can specify how that
handler should behave. If you specify the @code{SA_RESTART} flag,
return from that handler will resume a primitive; otherwise, return from
@@ -2111,7 +2111,7 @@ function. @xref{BSD Handler}.
@c !!! not true now about _BSD_SOURCE
When you don't specify with @code{sigaction} or @code{siginterrupt} what
a particular handler should do, it uses a default choice. The default
-choice in the GNU library depends on the feature test macros you have
+choice in @theglibc{} depends on the feature test macros you have
defined. If you define @code{_BSD_SOURCE} or @code{_GNU_SOURCE} before
calling @code{signal}, the default is to resume primitives; otherwise,
the default is to make them fail with @code{EINTR}. (The library
diff --git a/manual/socket.texi b/manual/socket.texi
index 3e3410ec2f3..a08ac4c675c 100644
--- a/manual/socket.texi
+++ b/manual/socket.texi
@@ -15,7 +15,7 @@ network. Sockets are the primary means of communicating with other
machines; @code{telnet}, @code{rlogin}, @code{ftp}, @code{talk} and the
other familiar network programs use sockets.
-Not all operating systems support sockets. In the GNU library, the
+Not all operating systems support sockets. In @theglibc{}, the
header file @file{sys/socket.h} exists regardless of the operating
system, and the socket functions always exist, but if the system does
not really support sockets these functions always fail.
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ happy as implementations which use 64-bit values.
@node Communication Styles
@section Communication Styles
-The GNU library includes support for several different kinds of sockets,
+@Theglibc{} includes support for several different kinds of sockets,
each with different characteristics. This section describes the
supported socket types. The symbolic constants listed here are
defined in @file{sys/socket.h}.
@@ -1276,7 +1276,7 @@ associated Internet address.
The lookup functions above all have one in common: they are not
reentrant and therefore unusable in multi-threaded applications.
-Therefore provides the GNU C library a new set of functions which can be
+Therefore provides @theglibc{} a new set of functions which can be
used in this context.
@comment netdb.h
diff --git a/manual/startup.texi b/manual/startup.texi
index d5695bf7d0d..caf8156a955 100644
--- a/manual/startup.texi
+++ b/manual/startup.texi
@@ -135,8 +135,8 @@ other words, the whitespace separating them is optional.) Thus,
@item
Options typically precede other non-option arguments.
-The implementations of @code{getopt} and @code{argp_parse} in the GNU C
-library normally make it appear as if all the option arguments were
+The implementations of @code{getopt} and @code{argp_parse} in @theglibc{}
+normally make it appear as if all the option arguments were
specified before all the non-option arguments for the purposes of
parsing, even if the user of your program intermixed option and
non-option arguments. They do this by reordering the elements of the
@@ -319,7 +319,7 @@ can be safely used in multi-threaded programs
@deftypefun {char *} getenv (const char *@var{name})
This function returns a string that is the value of the environment
variable @var{name}. You must not modify this string. In some non-Unix
-systems not using the GNU library, it might be overwritten by subsequent
+systems not using @theglibc{}, it might be overwritten by subsequent
calls to @code{getenv} (but not by any other library function). If the
environment variable @var{name} is not defined, the value is a null
pointer.
@@ -591,30 +591,30 @@ A system call is a request for service that a program makes of the
kernel. The service is generally something that only the kernel has
the privilege to do, such as doing I/O. Programmers don't normally
need to be concerned with system calls because there are functions in
-the GNU C library to do virtually everything that system calls do.
+@theglibc{} to do virtually everything that system calls do.
These functions work by making system calls themselves. For example,
there is a system call that changes the permissions of a file, but
-you don't need to know about it because you can just use the GNU C
-library's @code{chmod} function.
+you don't need to know about it because you can just use @theglibc{}'s
+@code{chmod} function.
@cindex kernel call
System calls are sometimes called kernel calls.
However, there are times when you want to make a system call explicitly,
-and for that, the GNU C library provides the @code{syscall} function.
+and for that, @theglibc{} provides the @code{syscall} function.
@code{syscall} is harder to use and less portable than functions like
@code{chmod}, but easier and more portable than coding the system call
in assembler instructions.
@code{syscall} is most useful when you are working with a system call
-which is special to your system or is newer than the GNU C library you
+which is special to your system or is newer than @theglibc{} you
are using. @code{syscall} is implemented in an entirely generic way;
the function does not know anything about what a particular system
call does or even if it is valid.
The description of @code{syscall} in this section assumes a certain
-protocol for system calls on the various platforms on which the GNU C
-library runs. That protocol is not defined by any strong authority, but
+protocol for system calls on the various platforms on which @theglibc{}
+runs. That protocol is not defined by any strong authority, but
we won't describe it here either because anyone who is coding
@code{syscall} probably won't accept anything less than kernel and C
library source code as a specification of the interface between them
@@ -864,7 +864,7 @@ pointer @var{arg}. At normal program termination, the @var{function} is
called with two arguments: the @var{status} value passed to @code{exit},
and the @var{arg}.
-This function is included in the GNU C library only for compatibility
+This function is included in @theglibc{} only for compatibility
for SunOS, and may not be supported by other implementations.
@end deftypefun
diff --git a/manual/stdio.texi b/manual/stdio.texi
index 2f27e318436..dd4d064c4be 100644
--- a/manual/stdio.texi
+++ b/manual/stdio.texi
@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@ shell. (The primitives shells use to implement these facilities are
described in @ref{File System Interface}.) Most other operating systems
provide similar mechanisms, but the details of how to use them can vary.
-In the GNU C library, @code{stdin}, @code{stdout}, and @code{stderr} are
+In @theglibc{}, @code{stdin}, @code{stdout}, and @code{stderr} are
normal variables which you can set just like any others. For example,
to redirect the standard output to a file, you could do:
@@ -196,7 +196,7 @@ Additional characters may appear after these to specify flags for the
call. Always put the mode (@samp{r}, @samp{w+}, etc.) first; that is
the only part you are guaranteed will be understood by all systems.
-The GNU C library defines one additional character for use in
+@Theglibc{} defines one additional character for use in
@var{opentype}: the character @samp{x} insists on creating a new
file---if a file @var{filename} already exists, @code{fopen} fails
rather than opening it. If you use @samp{x} you are guaranteed that
@@ -290,7 +290,7 @@ If the operation fails, a null pointer is returned; otherwise,
@code{freopen} has traditionally been used to connect a standard stream
such as @code{stdin} with a file of your own choice. This is useful in
programs in which use of a standard stream for certain purposes is
-hard-coded. In the GNU C library, you can simply close the standard
+hard-coded. In @theglibc{}, you can simply close the standard
streams and open new ones with @code{fopen}. But other systems lack
this ability, so using @code{freopen} is more portable.
@@ -318,7 +318,7 @@ In some situations it is useful to know whether a given stream is
available for reading or writing. This information is normally not
available and would have to be remembered separately. Solaris
introduced a few functions to get this information from the stream
-descriptor and these functions are also available in the GNU C library.
+descriptor and these functions are also available in @theglibc{}.
@comment stdio_ext.h
@comment GNU
@@ -394,7 +394,7 @@ you are using NFS.
The function @code{fclose} is declared in @file{stdio.h}.
@end deftypefun
-To close all streams currently available the GNU C Library provides
+To close all streams currently available @theglibc{} provides
another function.
@comment stdio.h
@@ -562,7 +562,7 @@ conservative and use locking.
There are two basic mechanisms to avoid locking. The first is to use
the @code{_unlocked} variants of the stream operations. The POSIX
-standard defines quite a few of those and the GNU library adds a few
+standard defines quite a few of those and @theglibc{} adds a few
more. These variants of the functions behave just like the functions
with the name without the suffix except that they do not lock the
stream. Using these functions is very desirable since they are
@@ -598,7 +598,7 @@ the loop terminates. Writing it the way illustrated above allows the
manipulation of the buffer of the stream.
A second way to avoid locking is by using a non-standard function which
-was introduced in Solaris and is available in the GNU C library as well.
+was introduced in Solaris and is available in @theglibc{} as well.
@comment stdio_ext.h
@comment GNU
@@ -1143,7 +1143,7 @@ convenient to have functions to read a line of text from a stream.
Standard C has functions to do this, but they aren't very safe: null
characters and even (for @code{gets}) long lines can confuse them. So
-the GNU library provides the nonstandard @code{getline} function that
+@theglibc{} provides the nonstandard @code{getline} function that
makes it easy to read lines reliably.
Another GNU extension, @code{getdelim}, generalizes @code{getline}. It
@@ -1289,7 +1289,7 @@ returns a null pointer; otherwise it returns @var{s}.
@strong{Warning:} The @code{gets} function is @strong{very dangerous}
because it provides no protection against overflowing the string
-@var{s}. The GNU library includes it for compatibility only. You
+@var{s}. @Theglibc{} includes it for compatibility only. You
should @strong{always} use @code{fgets} or @code{getline} instead. To
remind you of this, the linker (if using GNU @code{ld}) will issue a
warning whenever you use @code{gets}.
@@ -1383,10 +1383,10 @@ character that was actually read from the stream. In fact, it isn't
necessary to actually read any characters from the stream before
unreading them with @code{ungetc}! But that is a strange way to write a
program; usually @code{ungetc} is used only to unread a character that
-was just read from the same stream. The GNU C library supports this
+was just read from the same stream. @Theglibc{} supports this
even on files opened in binary mode, but other systems might not.
-The GNU C library only supports one character of pushback---in other
+@Theglibc{} only supports one character of pushback---in other
words, it does not work to call @code{ungetc} twice without doing input
in between. Other systems might let you push back multiple characters;
then reading from the stream retrieves the characters in the reverse
@@ -1658,7 +1658,7 @@ actual value in effect at runtime can be retrieved by using
Definition}.
Some system have a quite low limit such as @math{9} for @w{System V}
-systems. The GNU C library has no real limit.
+systems. @Theglibc{} has no real limit.
@end defvr
If any of the formats has a specification for the parameter position all
@@ -2149,7 +2149,7 @@ prints @samp{ nowhere }.
If there is a @samp{l} modifier present the argument is expected to be of type @code{wchar_t} (or @code{const wchar_t *}).
If you accidentally pass a null pointer as the argument for a @samp{%s}
-conversion, the GNU library prints it as @samp{(null)}. We think this
+conversion, @theglibc{} prints it as @samp{(null)}. We think this
is more useful than crashing. But it's not good practice to pass a null
argument intentionally.
@@ -2168,7 +2168,7 @@ fprintf (stderr, "can't open `%s': %s\n", filename, strerror (errno));
@end smallexample
@noindent
-The @samp{%m} conversion is a GNU C library extension.
+The @samp{%m} conversion is a @glibcadj{} extension.
The @samp{%p} conversion prints a pointer value. The corresponding
argument must be of type @code{void *}. In practice, you can use any
@@ -2371,7 +2371,7 @@ make_message (char *name, char *value)
In practice, it is often easier just to use @code{asprintf}, below.
-@strong{Attention:} In versions of the GNU C library prior to 2.1 the
+@strong{Attention:} In versions of @theglibc{} prior to 2.1 the
return value is the number of characters stored, not including the
terminating null; unless there was not enough space in @var{s} to
store the result in which case @code{-1} is returned. This was
@@ -2814,7 +2814,7 @@ validate_args (char *format, int nargs, OBJECT *args)
@cindex defining new @code{printf} conversions
@cindex extending @code{printf}
-The GNU C library lets you define your own custom conversion specifiers
+@Theglibc{} lets you define your own custom conversion specifiers
for @code{printf} template strings, to teach @code{printf} clever ways
to print the important data structures of your program.
@@ -2887,7 +2887,7 @@ about this.
@c but if you are never going to call @code{parse_printf_format}, you do
@c not need to define an arginfo function.
-@strong{Attention:} In the GNU C library versions before 2.0 the
+@strong{Attention:} In @theglibc{} versions before 2.0 the
@var{arginfo-function} function did not need to be installed unless
the user used the @code{parse_printf_format} function. This has changed.
Now a call to any of the @code{printf} functions will call this
@@ -3000,7 +3000,7 @@ width. The value is @code{'0'} if the @samp{0} flag was specified, and
Now let's look at how to define the handler and arginfo functions
which are passed as arguments to @code{register_printf_function}.
-@strong{Compatibility Note:} The interface changed in GNU libc
+@strong{Compatibility Note:} The interface changed in @theglibc{}
version 2.0. Previously the third argument was of type
@code{va_list *}.
@@ -3098,7 +3098,7 @@ The output produced by this program looks like:
@node Predefined Printf Handlers
@subsection Predefined @code{printf} Handlers
-The GNU libc also contains a concrete and useful application of the
+@Theglibc{} also contains a concrete and useful application of the
@code{printf} handler extension. There are two functions available
which implement a special way to print floating-point numbers.
@@ -3926,7 +3926,7 @@ previous I/O operation on that stream.
@deftypevr Macro int EOF
This macro is an integer value that is returned by a number of narrow
stream functions to indicate an end-of-file condition, or some other
-error situation. With the GNU library, @code{EOF} is @code{-1}. In
+error situation. With @theglibc{}, @code{EOF} is @code{-1}. In
other libraries, its value may be some other negative number.
This symbol is declared in @file{stdio.h}.
@@ -3937,7 +3937,7 @@ This symbol is declared in @file{stdio.h}.
@deftypevr Macro int WEOF
This macro is an integer value that is returned by a number of wide
stream functions to indicate an end-of-file condition, or some other
-error situation. With the GNU library, @code{WEOF} is @code{-1}. In
+error situation. With @theglibc{}, @code{WEOF} is @code{-1}. In
other libraries, its value may be some other negative number.
This symbol is declared in @file{wchar.h}.
@@ -4094,7 +4094,7 @@ systems, text and binary streams use different file formats, and the
only way to read or write ``an ordinary file of text'' that can work
with other text-oriented programs is through a text stream.
-In the GNU library, and on all POSIX systems, there is no difference
+In @theglibc{}, and on all POSIX systems, there is no difference
between text streams and binary streams. When you open a stream, you
get the same kind of stream regardless of whether you ask for binary.
This stream can handle any file content, and has none of the
@@ -4562,7 +4562,7 @@ necessary since it might be done in situations when terminal input is
required and the program wants to be sure that all output is visible on
the terminal. But this means that only line buffered streams have to be
flushed. Solaris introduced a function especially for this. It was
-always available in the GNU C library in some form but never officially
+always available in @theglibc{} in some form but never officially
exported.
@comment stdio_ext.h
@@ -4584,7 +4584,7 @@ In some situations it might be useful to not flush the output pending
for a stream but instead simply forget it. If transmission is costly
and the output is not needed anymore this is valid reasoning. In this
situation a non-standard function introduced in Solaris and available in
-the GNU C library can be used.
+@theglibc{} can be used.
@comment stdio_ext.h
@comment GNU
@@ -4722,8 +4722,8 @@ This function is provided for compatibility with old BSD code. Use
@end deftypefun
It is possible to query whether a given stream is line buffered or not
-using a non-standard function introduced in Solaris and available in the
-GNU C library.
+using a non-standard function introduced in Solaris and available in
+@theglibc{}.
@comment stdio_ext.h
@comment GNU
@@ -4762,7 +4762,7 @@ This function is declared in the @file{stdio_ext.h} header.
@node Other Kinds of Streams
@section Other Kinds of Streams
-The GNU library provides ways for you to define additional kinds of
+@Theglibc{} provides ways for you to define additional kinds of
streams that do not necessarily correspond to an open file.
One such type of stream takes input from or writes output to a string.
diff --git a/manual/string.texi b/manual/string.texi
index e02c17f1110..af21bccf48b 100644
--- a/manual/string.texi
+++ b/manual/string.texi
@@ -3,7 +3,7 @@
@chapter String and Array Utilities
Operations on strings (or arrays of characters) are an important part of
-many programs. The GNU C library provides an extensive set of string
+many programs. @Theglibc{} provides an extensive set of string
utility functions, including functions for copying, concatenating,
comparing, and searching strings. Many of these functions can also
operate on arbitrary regions of storage; for example, the @code{memcpy}
@@ -669,7 +669,7 @@ the end of the string @var{wto} (that is, the address of the terminating
null character @code{wto + strlen (wfrom)}) rather than the beginning.
This function is not part of ISO or POSIX but was found useful while
-developing the GNU C Library itself.
+developing @theglibc{} itself.
The behavior of @code{wcpcpy} is undefined if the strings overlap.
@@ -695,7 +695,7 @@ is implemented to be useful in contexts where this behavior of the
@emph{first} written null character.
This function is not part of ISO or POSIX but was found useful while
-developing the GNU C Library itself.
+developing @theglibc{} itself.
Its behavior is undefined if the strings overlap. The function is
declared in @file{string.h}.
@@ -721,7 +721,7 @@ is implemented to be useful in contexts where this behavior of the
@emph{first} written null character.
This function is not part of ISO or POSIX but was found useful while
-developing the GNU C Library itself.
+developing @theglibc{} itself.
Its behavior is undefined if the strings overlap.
@@ -1712,7 +1712,7 @@ There is no restriction on the second parameter of @code{strchr} so it
could very well also be the NUL character. Those readers thinking very
hard about this might now point out that the @code{strchr} function is
more expensive than the @code{strlen} function since we have two abort
-criteria. This is right. But in the GNU C library the implementation of
+criteria. This is right. But in @theglibc{} the implementation of
@code{strchr} is optimized in a special way so that @code{strchr}
actually is faster.
@@ -2027,7 +2027,7 @@ when @code{strtok} or @code{wcstok} tries to modify it, your program
will get a fatal signal for writing in read-only memory. @xref{Program
Error Signals}. Even if the operation of @code{strtok} or @code{wcstok}
would not require a modification of the string (e.g., if there is
-exactly one token) the string can (and in the GNU libc case will) be
+exactly one token) the string can (and in the @glibcadj{} case will) be
modified.
This is a special case of a general principle: if a part of a program
@@ -2064,7 +2064,7 @@ token = strtok (NULL, delimiters); /* token => "punctuation" */
token = strtok (NULL, delimiters); /* token => NULL */
@end smallexample
-The GNU C library contains two more functions for tokenizing a string
+@Theglibc{} contains two more functions for tokenizing a string
which overcome the limitation of non-reentrancy. They are only
available for multibyte character strings.
@@ -2220,8 +2220,8 @@ function can be found in @file{libgen.h}.
The function below addresses the perennial programming quandary: ``How do
I take good data in string form and painlessly turn it into garbage?''
This is actually a fairly simple task for C programmers who do not use
-the GNU C library string functions, but for programs based on the GNU C
-library, the @code{strfry} function is the preferred method for
+@theglibc{} string functions, but for programs based on @theglibc{},
+the @code{strfry} function is the preferred method for
destroying string data.
The prototype for this function is in @file{string.h}.
@@ -2237,7 +2237,7 @@ input with the anagram in place. For each position in the string,
The return value of @code{strfry} is always @var{string}.
-@strong{Portability Note:} This function is unique to the GNU C library.
+@strong{Portability Note:} This function is unique to @theglibc{}.
@end deftypefun
@@ -2278,7 +2278,7 @@ want to see it or doesn't want to see it very much. To really prevent
people from retrieving the information, use stronger encryption such as
that described in @xref{Cryptographic Functions}.
-@strong{Portability Note:} This function is unique to the GNU C library.
+@strong{Portability Note:} This function is unique to @theglibc{}.
@end deftypefun
diff --git a/manual/sysinfo.texi b/manual/sysinfo.texi
index bf8b138dada..1733bc3b58a 100644
--- a/manual/sysinfo.texi
+++ b/manual/sysinfo.texi
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ this array, in bytes. Note that this is @emph{not} the DNS hostname.
If the system participates in DNS, this is the FQDN (see above).
The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure. In
-the GNU C library, @code{gethostname} fails if @var{size} is not large
+@theglibc{}, @code{gethostname} fails if @var{size} is not large
enough; then you can try again with a larger array. The following
@code{errno} error condition is defined for this function:
@@ -251,8 +251,8 @@ system.
This is a description of the type of hardware that is in use.
Some systems provide a mechanism to interrogate the kernel directly for
-this information. On systems without such a mechanism, the GNU C
-library fills in this field based on the configuration name that was
+this information. On systems without such a mechanism, @theglibc{}
+fills in this field based on the configuration name that was
specified when building and installing the library.
GNU uses a three-part name to describe a system configuration; the three
@@ -276,8 +276,8 @@ hardware, it consists of the first two parts of the configuration name:
@end quotation
@item char nodename[]
-This is the host name of this particular computer. In the GNU C
-library, the value is the same as that returned by @code{gethostname};
+This is the host name of this particular computer. In @theglibc{},
+the value is the same as that returned by @code{gethostname};
see @ref{Host Identification}.
@ gethostname() is implemented with a call to uname().
@@ -344,7 +344,7 @@ gets stored.
For some programs it is desirable and necessary to access information
about whether a certain filesystem is mounted and, if it is, where, or
-simply to get lists of all the available filesystems. The GNU libc
+simply to get lists of all the available filesystems. @Theglibc{}
provides some functions to retrieve this information portably.
Traditionally Unix systems have a file named @file{/etc/fstab} which
@@ -465,7 +465,7 @@ related to the @code{dump} utility used on Unix systems.
@end deftp
-To read the entire content of the of the @file{fstab} file the GNU libc
+To read the entire content of the of the @file{fstab} file @theglibc{}
contains a set of three functions which are designed in the usual way.
@comment fstab.h
@@ -634,8 +634,8 @@ which is uninteresting for all programs beside @code{dump}.
For accessing the @file{mtab} file there is again a set of three
functions to access all entries in a row. Unlike the functions to
handle @file{fstab} these functions do not access a fixed file and there
-is even a thread safe variant of the get function. Beside this the GNU
-libc contains functions to alter the file and test for specific options.
+is even a thread safe variant of the get function. Beside this @theglibc
+contains functions to alter the file and test for specific options.
@comment mntent.h
@comment BSD
@@ -1184,7 +1184,7 @@ cat /proc/sys/vm/freepages
@c possible to create a sysctl-only parameter.
Some more traditional and more widely available, though less general,
-GNU C library functions for getting and setting some of the same system
+@glibcadj{} functions for getting and setting some of the same system
parameters are:
@itemize @bullet
diff --git a/manual/syslog.texi b/manual/syslog.texi
index 46999784778..6d338ece893 100644
--- a/manual/syslog.texi
+++ b/manual/syslog.texi
@@ -107,11 +107,11 @@ Syslog facility/priority (It can be both because the facility code for
the kernel is zero, and that makes priority and facility/priority the
same value).
-The GNU C library provides functions to submit messages to Syslog. They
+@Theglibc{} provides functions to submit messages to Syslog. They
do it by writing to the @file{/dev/log} socket. @xref{Submitting Syslog
Messages}.
-The GNU C library functions only work to submit messages to the Syslog
+The @glibcadj{} functions only work to submit messages to the Syslog
facility on the same system. To submit a message to the Syslog facility
on another system, use the socket I/O functions to write a UDP datagram
to the @code{syslog} UDP port on that system. @xref{Sockets}.
@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@ to the @code{syslog} UDP port on that system. @xref{Sockets}.
@node Submitting Syslog Messages
@section Submitting Syslog Messages
-The GNU C library provides functions to submit messages to the Syslog
+@Theglibc{} provides functions to submit messages to the Syslog
facility:
@menu
@@ -341,7 +341,7 @@ Results are undefined if the facility code is anything else.
the kernel. But you can't specify that facility code with these
functions. If you try, it looks the same to @code{syslog} as if you are
requesting the default facility. But you wouldn't want to anyway,
-because any program that uses the GNU C library is not the kernel.
+because any program that uses @theglibc{} is not the kernel.
You can use just a priority code as @var{facility_priority}. In that
case, @code{syslog} assumes the default facility established when the
@@ -429,8 +429,8 @@ to @var{ident}. The default identification string is the program name
taken from argv[0].
If you are writing shared library code that uses @code{openlog} to
-generate custom syslog output, you should use @code{closelog} to drop the
-GNU C library's internal reference to the @var{ident} pointer when you are
+generate custom syslog output, you should use @code{closelog} to drop
+@theglibc{}'s internal reference to the @var{ident} pointer when you are
done. Please read the section on @code{openlog} for more information:
@xref{openlog}.
diff --git a/manual/terminal.texi b/manual/terminal.texi
index db7780f65fe..c93082dfe15 100644
--- a/manual/terminal.texi
+++ b/manual/terminal.texi
@@ -1068,7 +1068,7 @@ which device you plan to set the speed for. If you use @code{tcsetattr}
to set the speed of a particular device to a value that it cannot
handle, @code{tcsetattr} returns @math{-1}.
-@strong{Portability note:} In the GNU library, the functions above
+@strong{Portability note:} In @theglibc{}, the functions above
accept speeds measured in bits per second as input, and return speed
values measured in bits per second. Other libraries require speeds to
be indicated by special codes. For POSIX.1 portability, you must use
@@ -1612,7 +1612,7 @@ system for a subsequent call to @code{read}.
actually the same as the EOF and EOL slots. This causes no serious
problem because the MIN and TIME slots are used only in noncanonical
input and the EOF and EOL slots are used only in canonical input, but it
-isn't very clean. The GNU library allocates separate slots for these
+isn't very clean. @Theglibc{} allocates separate slots for these
uses.
@comment termios.h
@@ -1642,7 +1642,7 @@ It does exactly this:
The usual way to get and set terminal modes is with the functions described
in @ref{Terminal Modes}. However, on some systems you can use the
BSD-derived functions in this section to do some of the same thing. On
-many systems, these functions do not exist. Even with the GNU C library,
+many systems, these functions do not exist. Even with @theglibc{},
the functions simply fail with @code{errno} = @code{ENOSYS} with many
kernels, including Linux.
diff --git a/manual/time.texi b/manual/time.texi
index f1f4254e90d..78396f23e0c 100644
--- a/manual/time.texi
+++ b/manual/time.texi
@@ -89,8 +89,8 @@ other systems, the @code{time_t} data type might use some other encoding
where subtraction doesn't work directly.
@end deftypefun
-The GNU C library provides two data types specifically for representing
-an elapsed time. They are used by various GNU C library functions, and
+@Theglibc{} provides two data types specifically for representing
+an elapsed time. They are used by various @glibcadj{} functions, and
you can use them for your own purposes too. They're exactly the same
except that one has a resolution in microseconds, and the other, newer
one, is in nanoseconds.
@@ -173,7 +173,7 @@ Common functions that use @code{struct timeval} are @code{gettimeofday}
and @code{settimeofday}.
-There are no GNU C library functions specifically oriented toward
+There are no @glibcadj{} functions specifically oriented toward
dealing with elapsed times, but the calendar time, processor time, and
alarm and sleeping functions have a lot to do with them.
@@ -356,7 +356,7 @@ and @code{tms_stime} fields returned by @code{times}.
This section describes facilities for keeping track of calendar time.
@xref{Time Basics}.
-The GNU C library represents calendar time three ways:
+@Theglibc{} represents calendar time three ways:
@itemize @bullet
@item
@@ -423,7 +423,7 @@ Note that a simple time has no concept of local time zone. Calendar
Time @var{T} is the same instant in time regardless of where on the
globe the computer is.
-In the GNU C library, @code{time_t} is equivalent to @code{long int}.
+In @theglibc{}, @code{time_t} is equivalent to @code{long int}.
In other systems, @code{time_t} might be either an integer or
floating-point type.
@end deftp
@@ -474,7 +474,7 @@ The process is not superuser.
The @code{time_t} data type used to represent simple times has a
resolution of only one second. Some applications need more precision.
-So, the GNU C library also contains functions which are capable of
+So, @theglibc{} also contains functions which are capable of
representing calendar times to a higher resolution than one second. The
functions and the associated data types described in this section are
declared in @file{sys/time.h}.
@@ -616,7 +616,7 @@ This function is present only with a Linux kernel.
@cindex broken-down time
@cindex calendar time and broken-down time
-Calendar time is represented by the usual GNU C library functions as an
+Calendar time is represented by the usual @glibcadj{} functions as an
elapsed time since a fixed base calendar time. This is convenient for
computation, but has no relation to the way people normally think of
calendar time. By contrast, @dfn{broken-down time} is a binary
@@ -1018,7 +1018,7 @@ The process specified a settings update, but is not superuser.
For more details see RFC1305 (Network Time Protocol, Version 3) and
related documents.
-@strong{Portability note:} Early versions of the GNU C library did not
+@strong{Portability note:} Early versions of @theglibc{} did not
have this function but did have the synonymous @code{adjtimex}.
@end deftypefun
@@ -1775,7 +1775,7 @@ which can match zero or more whitespace characters in the format string.
@strong{Portability Note:} The XPG standard advises applications to use
at least one whitespace character (as specified by @code{isspace}) or
other non-alphanumeric characters between any two conversion
-specifications. The @w{GNU C Library} does not have this limitation but
+specifications. @Theglibc{} does not have this limitation but
other libraries might have trouble parsing formats like
@code{"%d%m%Y%H%M%S"}.
@@ -1800,7 +1800,7 @@ does not specify what happens to those elements of @var{tm} which are
not directly initialized by the different formats. The
implementations on different Unix systems vary here.
-The GNU libc implementation does not touch those fields which are not
+The @glibcadj{} implementation does not touch those fields which are not
directly initialized. Exceptions are the @code{tm_wday} and
@code{tm_yday} elements, which are recomputed if any of the year, month,
or date elements changed. This has two implications:
@@ -2036,7 +2036,7 @@ different time zone, and would like times reported to you in the time
zone local to you, rather than what is local to the computer.
In POSIX.1 systems the value of the @code{TZ} variable can be in one of
-three formats. With the GNU C library, the most common format is the
+three formats. With @theglibc{}, the most common format is the
last one, which can specify a selection from a large database of time
zone information for many regions of the world. The first two formats
are used to describe the time zone information directly, which is both
@@ -2137,16 +2137,16 @@ The third format looks like this:
:@var{characters}
@end smallexample
-Each operating system interprets this format differently; in the GNU C
-library, @var{characters} is the name of a file which describes the time
+Each operating system interprets this format differently; in
+@theglibc{}, @var{characters} is the name of a file which describes the time
zone.
@pindex /etc/localtime
@pindex localtime
If the @code{TZ} environment variable does not have a value, the
-operation chooses a time zone by default. In the GNU C library, the
+operation chooses a time zone by default. In @theglibc{}, the
default time zone is like the specification @samp{TZ=:/etc/localtime}
-(or @samp{TZ=:/usr/local/etc/localtime}, depending on how GNU C library
+(or @samp{TZ=:/usr/local/etc/localtime}, depending on how @theglibc{}
was configured; @pxref{Installation}). Other C libraries use their own
rule for choosing the default time zone, so there is little we can say
about them.
@@ -2163,7 +2163,7 @@ subdirectories for geographical areas; for example,
@file{America/New_York}, @file{Europe/London}, @file{Asia/Hong_Kong}.
These data files are installed by the system administrator, who also
sets @file{/etc/localtime} to point to the data file for the local time
-zone. The GNU C library comes with a large database of time zone
+zone. @Theglibc{} comes with a large database of time zone
information for most regions of the world, which is maintained by a
community of volunteers and put in the public domain.
diff --git a/manual/users.texi b/manual/users.texi
index bdc2d6871d9..819d35fcc47 100644
--- a/manual/users.texi
+++ b/manual/users.texi
@@ -207,15 +207,15 @@ facilities, you must include the header files @file{sys/types.h} and
@comment sys/types.h
@comment POSIX.1
@deftp {Data Type} uid_t
-This is an integer data type used to represent user IDs. In the GNU
-library, this is an alias for @code{unsigned int}.
+This is an integer data type used to represent user IDs. In
+@theglibc{}, this is an alias for @code{unsigned int}.
@end deftp
@comment sys/types.h
@comment POSIX.1
@deftp {Data Type} gid_t
-This is an integer data type used to represent group IDs. In the GNU
-library, this is an alias for @code{unsigned int}.
+This is an integer data type used to represent group IDs. In
+@theglibc{}, this is an alias for @code{unsigned int}.
@end deftp
@comment unistd.h
@@ -1118,7 +1118,7 @@ the user accounting database.
All the @code{get*} functions mentioned before store the information
they return in a static buffer. This can be a problem in multi-threaded
programs since the data returned for the request is overwritten by the
-return value data in another thread. Therefore the GNU C Library
+return value data in another thread. Therefore @theglibc{}
provides as extensions three more functions which return the data in a
user-provided buffer.
@@ -1202,7 +1202,7 @@ therefore the return value does not say anything about whether the
database can be successfully opened.
@end deftypefun
-Specially for maintaining log-like databases the GNU C Library provides
+Specially for maintaining log-like databases @theglibc{} provides
the following function:
@comment utmp.h
@@ -1941,7 +1941,7 @@ without loops.
Sun's implementation allows netgroups only for the @code{nis} or
@code{nisplus} service, @pxref{Services in the NSS configuration}. The
-implementation in the GNU C library has no such restriction. An entry
+implementation in @theglibc{} has no such restriction. An entry
in either of the input services must have the following form:
@smallexample