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* keys: Handle there being no fallback destination keyring for request_key()David Howells2009-04-091-3/+6
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | When request_key() is called, without there being any standard process keyrings on which to fall back if a destination keyring is not specified, an oops is liable to occur when construct_alloc_key() calls down_write() on dest_keyring's semaphore. Due to function inlining this may be seen as an oops in down_write() as called from request_key_and_link(). This situation crops up during boot, where request_key() is called from within the kernel (such as in CIFS mounts) where nobody is actually logged in, and so PAM has not had a chance to create a session keyring and user keyrings to act as the fallback. To fix this, make construct_alloc_key() not attempt to cache a key if there is no fallback key if no destination keyring is given specifically. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Tested-by: Jeff Layton <jlayton@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: make procfiles per-user-namespaceSerge E. Hallyn2009-02-271-6/+49
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | Restrict the /proc/keys and /proc/key-users output to keys belonging to the same user namespace as the reading task. We may want to make this more complicated - so that any keys in a user-namespace which is belongs to the reading task are also shown. But let's see if anyone wants that first. Signed-off-by: Serge E. Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* keys: skip keys from another user namespaceSerge E. Hallyn2009-02-271-0/+3
| | | | | | | | | | | When listing keys, do not return keys belonging to the same uid in another user namespace. Otherwise uid 500 in another user namespace will return keyrings called uid.500 for another user namespace. Signed-off-by: Serge E. Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* keys: consider user namespace in key_permissionSerge E. Hallyn2009-02-271-0/+5
| | | | | | | | | If a key is owned by another user namespace, then treat the key as though it is owned by both another uid and gid. Signed-off-by: Serge E. Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* keys: distinguish per-uid keys in different namespacesSerge E. Hallyn2009-02-275-5/+16
| | | | | | | | | | | | | per-uid keys were looked by uid only. Use the user namespace to distinguish the same uid in different namespaces. This does not address key_permission. So a task can for instance try to join a keyring owned by the same uid in another namespace. That will be handled by a separate patch. Signed-off-by: Serge E. Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* security: introduce missing kfreeVegard Nossum2009-01-171-0/+1
| | | | | | | | | | Plug this leak. Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: <stable@kernel.org> Signed-off-by: Vegard Nossum <vegard.nossum@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* [CVE-2009-0029] System call wrappers part 28Heiko Carstens2009-01-141-2/+2
| | | | Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
* [CVE-2009-0029] System call wrappers part 27Heiko Carstens2009-01-141-9/+9
| | | | Signed-off-by: Heiko Carstens <heiko.carstens@de.ibm.com>
* keys: fix sparse warning by adding __user annotation to castJames Morris2009-01-011-1/+1
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Fix the following sparse warning: CC security/keys/key.o security/keys/keyctl.c:1297:10: warning: incorrect type in argument 2 (different address spaces) security/keys/keyctl.c:1297:10: expected char [noderef] <asn:1>*buffer security/keys/keyctl.c:1297:10: got char *<noident> which appears to be caused by lack of __user annotation to the cast of a syscall argument. Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
* KEYS: Fix variable uninitialisation warningsDavid Howells2008-12-291-3/+3
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Fix variable uninitialisation warnings introduced in: commit 8bbf4976b59fc9fc2861e79cab7beb3f6d647640 Author: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Date: Fri Nov 14 10:39:14 2008 +1100 KEYS: Alter use of key instantiation link-to-keyring argument As: security/keys/keyctl.c: In function 'keyctl_negate_key': security/keys/keyctl.c:976: warning: 'dest_keyring' may be used uninitialized in this function security/keys/keyctl.c: In function 'keyctl_instantiate_key': security/keys/keyctl.c:898: warning: 'dest_keyring' may be used uninitialized in this function Some versions of gcc notice that get_instantiation_key() doesn't always set *_dest_keyring, but fail to observe that if this happens then *_dest_keyring will not be read by the caller. Reported-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* CRED: Make execve() take advantage of copy-on-write credentialsDavid Howells2008-11-141-42/+0
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Make execve() take advantage of copy-on-write credentials, allowing it to set up the credentials in advance, and then commit the whole lot after the point of no return. This patch and the preceding patches have been tested with the LTP SELinux testsuite. This patch makes several logical sets of alteration: (1) execve(). The credential bits from struct linux_binprm are, for the most part, replaced with a single credentials pointer (bprm->cred). This means that all the creds can be calculated in advance and then applied at the point of no return with no possibility of failure. I would like to replace bprm->cap_effective with: cap_isclear(bprm->cap_effective) but this seems impossible due to special behaviour for processes of pid 1 (they always retain their parent's capability masks where normally they'd be changed - see cap_bprm_set_creds()). The following sequence of events now happens: (a) At the start of do_execve, the current task's cred_exec_mutex is locked to prevent PTRACE_ATTACH from obsoleting the calculation of creds that we make. (a) prepare_exec_creds() is then called to make a copy of the current task's credentials and prepare it. This copy is then assigned to bprm->cred. This renders security_bprm_alloc() and security_bprm_free() unnecessary, and so they've been removed. (b) The determination of unsafe execution is now performed immediately after (a) rather than later on in the code. The result is stored in bprm->unsafe for future reference. (c) prepare_binprm() is called, possibly multiple times. (i) This applies the result of set[ug]id binaries to the new creds attached to bprm->cred. Personality bit clearance is recorded, but now deferred on the basis that the exec procedure may yet fail. (ii) This then calls the new security_bprm_set_creds(). This should calculate the new LSM and capability credentials into *bprm->cred. This folds together security_bprm_set() and parts of security_bprm_apply_creds() (these two have been removed). Anything that might fail must be done at this point. (iii) bprm->cred_prepared is set to 1. bprm->cred_prepared is 0 on the first pass of the security calculations, and 1 on all subsequent passes. This allows SELinux in (ii) to base its calculations only on the initial script and not on the interpreter. (d) flush_old_exec() is called to commit the task to execution. This performs the following steps with regard to credentials: (i) Clear pdeath_signal and set dumpable on certain circumstances that may not be covered by commit_creds(). (ii) Clear any bits in current->personality that were deferred from (c.i). (e) install_exec_creds() [compute_creds() as was] is called to install the new credentials. This performs the following steps with regard to credentials: (i) Calls security_bprm_committing_creds() to apply any security requirements, such as flushing unauthorised files in SELinux, that must be done before the credentials are changed. This is made up of bits of security_bprm_apply_creds() and security_bprm_post_apply_creds(), both of which have been removed. This function is not allowed to fail; anything that might fail must have been done in (c.ii). (ii) Calls commit_creds() to apply the new credentials in a single assignment (more or less). Possibly pdeath_signal and dumpable should be part of struct creds. (iii) Unlocks the task's cred_replace_mutex, thus allowing PTRACE_ATTACH to take place. (iv) Clears The bprm->cred pointer as the credentials it was holding are now immutable. (v) Calls security_bprm_committed_creds() to apply any security alterations that must be done after the creds have been changed. SELinux uses this to flush signals and signal handlers. (f) If an error occurs before (d.i), bprm_free() will call abort_creds() to destroy the proposed new credentials and will then unlock cred_replace_mutex. No changes to the credentials will have been made. (2) LSM interface. A number of functions have been changed, added or removed: (*) security_bprm_alloc(), ->bprm_alloc_security() (*) security_bprm_free(), ->bprm_free_security() Removed in favour of preparing new credentials and modifying those. (*) security_bprm_apply_creds(), ->bprm_apply_creds() (*) security_bprm_post_apply_creds(), ->bprm_post_apply_creds() Removed; split between security_bprm_set_creds(), security_bprm_committing_creds() and security_bprm_committed_creds(). (*) security_bprm_set(), ->bprm_set_security() Removed; folded into security_bprm_set_creds(). (*) security_bprm_set_creds(), ->bprm_set_creds() New. The new credentials in bprm->creds should be checked and set up as appropriate. bprm->cred_prepared is 0 on the first call, 1 on the second and subsequent calls. (*) security_bprm_committing_creds(), ->bprm_committing_creds() (*) security_bprm_committed_creds(), ->bprm_committed_creds() New. Apply the security effects of the new credentials. This includes closing unauthorised files in SELinux. This function may not fail. When the former is called, the creds haven't yet been applied to the process; when the latter is called, they have. The former may access bprm->cred, the latter may not. (3) SELinux. SELinux has a number of changes, in addition to those to support the LSM interface changes mentioned above: (a) The bprm_security_struct struct has been removed in favour of using the credentials-under-construction approach. (c) flush_unauthorized_files() now takes a cred pointer and passes it on to inode_has_perm(), file_has_perm() and dentry_open(). Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* CRED: Inaugurate COW credentialsDavid Howells2008-11-149-269/+317
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Inaugurate copy-on-write credentials management. This uses RCU to manage the credentials pointer in the task_struct with respect to accesses by other tasks. A process may only modify its own credentials, and so does not need locking to access or modify its own credentials. A mutex (cred_replace_mutex) is added to the task_struct to control the effect of PTRACE_ATTACHED on credential calculations, particularly with respect to execve(). With this patch, the contents of an active credentials struct may not be changed directly; rather a new set of credentials must be prepared, modified and committed using something like the following sequence of events: struct cred *new = prepare_creds(); int ret = blah(new); if (ret < 0) { abort_creds(new); return ret; } return commit_creds(new); There are some exceptions to this rule: the keyrings pointed to by the active credentials may be instantiated - keyrings violate the COW rule as managing COW keyrings is tricky, given that it is possible for a task to directly alter the keys in a keyring in use by another task. To help enforce this, various pointers to sets of credentials, such as those in the task_struct, are declared const. The purpose of this is compile-time discouragement of altering credentials through those pointers. Once a set of credentials has been made public through one of these pointers, it may not be modified, except under special circumstances: (1) Its reference count may incremented and decremented. (2) The keyrings to which it points may be modified, but not replaced. The only safe way to modify anything else is to create a replacement and commit using the functions described in Documentation/credentials.txt (which will be added by a later patch). This patch and the preceding patches have been tested with the LTP SELinux testsuite. This patch makes several logical sets of alteration: (1) execve(). This now prepares and commits credentials in various places in the security code rather than altering the current creds directly. (2) Temporary credential overrides. do_coredump() and sys_faccessat() now prepare their own credentials and temporarily override the ones currently on the acting thread, whilst preventing interference from other threads by holding cred_replace_mutex on the thread being dumped. This will be replaced in a future patch by something that hands down the credentials directly to the functions being called, rather than altering the task's objective credentials. (3) LSM interface. A number of functions have been changed, added or removed: (*) security_capset_check(), ->capset_check() (*) security_capset_set(), ->capset_set() Removed in favour of security_capset(). (*) security_capset(), ->capset() New. This is passed a pointer to the new creds, a pointer to the old creds and the proposed capability sets. It should fill in the new creds or return an error. All pointers, barring the pointer to the new creds, are now const. (*) security_bprm_apply_creds(), ->bprm_apply_creds() Changed; now returns a value, which will cause the process to be killed if it's an error. (*) security_task_alloc(), ->task_alloc_security() Removed in favour of security_prepare_creds(). (*) security_cred_free(), ->cred_free() New. Free security data attached to cred->security. (*) security_prepare_creds(), ->cred_prepare() New. Duplicate any security data attached to cred->security. (*) security_commit_creds(), ->cred_commit() New. Apply any security effects for the upcoming installation of new security by commit_creds(). (*) security_task_post_setuid(), ->task_post_setuid() Removed in favour of security_task_fix_setuid(). (*) security_task_fix_setuid(), ->task_fix_setuid() Fix up the proposed new credentials for setuid(). This is used by cap_set_fix_setuid() to implicitly adjust capabilities in line with setuid() changes. Changes are made to the new credentials, rather than the task itself as in security_task_post_setuid(). (*) security_task_reparent_to_init(), ->task_reparent_to_init() Removed. Instead the task being reparented to init is referred directly to init's credentials. NOTE! This results in the loss of some state: SELinux's osid no longer records the sid of the thread that forked it. (*) security_key_alloc(), ->key_alloc() (*) security_key_permission(), ->key_permission() Changed. These now take cred pointers rather than task pointers to refer to the security context. (4) sys_capset(). This has been simplified and uses less locking. The LSM functions it calls have been merged. (5) reparent_to_kthreadd(). This gives the current thread the same credentials as init by simply using commit_thread() to point that way. (6) __sigqueue_alloc() and switch_uid() __sigqueue_alloc() can't stop the target task from changing its creds beneath it, so this function gets a reference to the currently applicable user_struct which it then passes into the sigqueue struct it returns if successful. switch_uid() is now called from commit_creds(), and possibly should be folded into that. commit_creds() should take care of protecting __sigqueue_alloc(). (7) [sg]et[ug]id() and co and [sg]et_current_groups. The set functions now all use prepare_creds(), commit_creds() and abort_creds() to build and check a new set of credentials before applying it. security_task_set[ug]id() is called inside the prepared section. This guarantees that nothing else will affect the creds until we've finished. The calling of set_dumpable() has been moved into commit_creds(). Much of the functionality of set_user() has been moved into commit_creds(). The get functions all simply access the data directly. (8) security_task_prctl() and cap_task_prctl(). security_task_prctl() has been modified to return -ENOSYS if it doesn't want to handle a function, or otherwise return the return value directly rather than through an argument. Additionally, cap_task_prctl() now prepares a new set of credentials, even if it doesn't end up using it. (9) Keyrings. A number of changes have been made to the keyrings code: (a) switch_uid_keyring(), copy_keys(), exit_keys() and suid_keys() have all been dropped and built in to the credentials functions directly. They may want separating out again later. (b) key_alloc() and search_process_keyrings() now take a cred pointer rather than a task pointer to specify the security context. (c) copy_creds() gives a new thread within the same thread group a new thread keyring if its parent had one, otherwise it discards the thread keyring. (d) The authorisation key now points directly to the credentials to extend the search into rather pointing to the task that carries them. (e) Installing thread, process or session keyrings causes a new set of credentials to be created, even though it's not strictly necessary for process or session keyrings (they're shared). (10) Usermode helper. The usermode helper code now carries a cred struct pointer in its subprocess_info struct instead of a new session keyring pointer. This set of credentials is derived from init_cred and installed on the new process after it has been cloned. call_usermodehelper_setup() allocates the new credentials and call_usermodehelper_freeinfo() discards them if they haven't been used. A special cred function (prepare_usermodeinfo_creds()) is provided specifically for call_usermodehelper_setup() to call. call_usermodehelper_setkeys() adjusts the credentials to sport the supplied keyring as the new session keyring. (11) SELinux. SELinux has a number of changes, in addition to those to support the LSM interface changes mentioned above: (a) selinux_setprocattr() no longer does its check for whether the current ptracer can access processes with the new SID inside the lock that covers getting the ptracer's SID. Whilst this lock ensures that the check is done with the ptracer pinned, the result is only valid until the lock is released, so there's no point doing it inside the lock. (12) is_single_threaded(). This function has been extracted from selinux_setprocattr() and put into a file of its own in the lib/ directory as join_session_keyring() now wants to use it too. The code in SELinux just checked to see whether a task shared mm_structs with other tasks (CLONE_VM), but that isn't good enough. We really want to know if they're part of the same thread group (CLONE_THREAD). (13) nfsd. The NFS server daemon now has to use the COW credentials to set the credentials it is going to use. It really needs to pass the credentials down to the functions it calls, but it can't do that until other patches in this series have been applied. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* CRED: Separate per-task-group keyrings from signal_structDavid Howells2008-11-142-80/+54
| | | | | | | | | Separate per-task-group keyrings from signal_struct and dangle their anchor from the cred struct rather than the signal_struct. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* CRED: Use RCU to access another task's creds and to release a task's own credsDavid Howells2008-11-142-14/+20
| | | | | | | | | | | | Use RCU to access another task's creds and to release a task's own creds. This means that it will be possible for the credentials of a task to be replaced without another task (a) requiring a full lock to read them, and (b) seeing deallocated memory. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* CRED: Wrap current->cred and a few other accessorsDavid Howells2008-11-142-6/+7
| | | | | | | | | | Wrap current->cred and a few other accessors to hide their actual implementation. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* CRED: Separate task security context from task_structDavid Howells2008-11-145-78/+86
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Separate the task security context from task_struct. At this point, the security data is temporarily embedded in the task_struct with two pointers pointing to it. Note that the Alpha arch is altered as it refers to (E)UID and (E)GID in entry.S via asm-offsets. With comment fixes Signed-off-by: Marc Dionne <marc.c.dionne@gmail.com> Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* KEYS: Alter use of key instantiation link-to-keyring argumentDavid Howells2008-11-145-111/+187
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Alter the use of the key instantiation and negation functions' link-to-keyring arguments. Currently this specifies a keyring in the target process to link the key into, creating the keyring if it doesn't exist. This, however, can be a problem for copy-on-write credentials as it means that the instantiating process can alter the credentials of the requesting process. This patch alters the behaviour such that: (1) If keyctl_instantiate_key() or keyctl_negate_key() are given a specific keyring by ID (ringid >= 0), then that keyring will be used. (2) If keyctl_instantiate_key() or keyctl_negate_key() are given one of the special constants that refer to the requesting process's keyrings (KEY_SPEC_*_KEYRING, all <= 0), then: (a) If sys_request_key() was given a keyring to use (destringid) then the key will be attached to that keyring. (b) If sys_request_key() was given a NULL keyring, then the key being instantiated will be attached to the default keyring as set by keyctl_set_reqkey_keyring(). (3) No extra link will be made. Decision point (1) follows current behaviour, and allows those instantiators who've searched for a specifically named keyring in the requestor's keyring so as to partition the keys by type to still have their named keyrings. Decision point (2) allows the requestor to make sure that the key or keys that get produced by request_key() go where they want, whilst allowing the instantiator to request that the key is retained. This is mainly useful for situations where the instantiator makes a secondary request, the key for which should be retained by the initial requestor: +-----------+ +--------------+ +--------------+ | | | | | | | Requestor |------->| Instantiator |------->| Instantiator | | | | | | | +-----------+ +--------------+ +--------------+ request_key() request_key() This might be useful, for example, in Kerberos, where the requestor requests a ticket, and then the ticket instantiator requests the TGT, which someone else then has to go and fetch. The TGT, however, should be retained in the keyrings of the requestor, not the first instantiator. To make this explict an extra special keyring constant is also added. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* KEYS: Disperse linux/key_ui.hDavid Howells2008-11-143-1/+33
| | | | | | | | | Disperse the bits of linux/key_ui.h as the reason they were put here (keyfs) didn't get in. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* CRED: Wrap task credential accesses in the key management codeDavid Howells2008-11-144-8/+8
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Wrap access to task credentials so that they can be separated more easily from the task_struct during the introduction of COW creds. Change most current->(|e|s|fs)[ug]id to current_(|e|s|fs)[ug]id(). Change some task->e?[ug]id to task_e?[ug]id(). In some places it makes more sense to use RCU directly rather than a convenient wrapper; these will be addressed by later patches. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Reviewed-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Acked-by: Serge Hallyn <serue@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* keys: remove unused key_alloc_semDaniel Walker2008-06-061-1/+0
| | | | | | | | | This semaphore doesn't appear to be used, so remove it. Signed-off-by: Daniel Walker <dwalker@mvista.com> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: explicitly include required slab.h header file.Robert P. J. Day2008-04-292-0/+2
| | | | | | | | | | Since these two source files invoke kmalloc(), they should explicitly include <linux/slab.h>. Signed-off-by: Robert P. J. Day <rpjday@crashcourse.ca> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: make the keyring quotas controllable through /proc/sysDavid Howells2008-04-296-15/+94
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Make the keyring quotas controllable through /proc/sys files: (*) /proc/sys/kernel/keys/root_maxkeys /proc/sys/kernel/keys/root_maxbytes Maximum number of keys that root may have and the maximum total number of bytes of data that root may have stored in those keys. (*) /proc/sys/kernel/keys/maxkeys /proc/sys/kernel/keys/maxbytes Maximum number of keys that each non-root user may have and the maximum total number of bytes of data that each of those users may have stored in their keys. Also increase the quotas as a number of people have been complaining that it's not big enough. I'm not sure that it's big enough now either, but on the other hand, it can now be set in /etc/sysctl.conf. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Cc: <arunsr@cse.iitk.ac.in> Cc: <dwalsh@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: don't generate user and user session keyrings unless they're accessedDavid Howells2008-04-294-118/+92
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Don't generate the per-UID user and user session keyrings unless they're explicitly accessed. This solves a problem during a login process whereby set*uid() is called before the SELinux PAM module, resulting in the per-UID keyrings having the wrong security labels. This also cures the problem of multiple per-UID keyrings sometimes appearing due to PAM modules (including pam_keyinit) setuiding and causing user_structs to come into and go out of existence whilst the session keyring pins the user keyring. This is achieved by first searching for extant per-UID keyrings before inventing new ones. The serial bound argument is also dropped from find_keyring_by_name() as it's not currently made use of (setting it to 0 disables the feature). Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Cc: <arunsr@cse.iitk.ac.in> Cc: <dwalsh@redhat.com> Cc: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: Chris Wright <chrisw@sous-sol.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: allow clients to set key perms in key_create_or_update()Arun Raghavan2008-04-292-9/+12
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | The key_create_or_update() function provided by the keyring code has a default set of permissions that are always applied to the key when created. This might not be desirable to all clients. Here's a patch that adds a "perm" parameter to the function to address this, which can be set to KEY_PERM_UNDEF to revert to the current behaviour. Signed-off-by: Arun Raghavan <arunsr@cse.iitk.ac.in> Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Satyam Sharma <ssatyam@cse.iitk.ac.in> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: switch to proc_create()Alexey Dobriyan2008-04-291-6/+2
| | | | | | | Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@sw.ru> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: add keyctl function to get a security labelDavid Howells2008-04-293-1/+71
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Add a keyctl() function to get the security label of a key. The following is added to Documentation/keys.txt: (*) Get the LSM security context attached to a key. long keyctl(KEYCTL_GET_SECURITY, key_serial_t key, char *buffer, size_t buflen) This function returns a string that represents the LSM security context attached to a key in the buffer provided. Unless there's an error, it always returns the amount of data it could produce, even if that's too big for the buffer, but it won't copy more than requested to userspace. If the buffer pointer is NULL then no copy will take place. A NUL character is included at the end of the string if the buffer is sufficiently big. This is included in the returned count. If no LSM is in force then an empty string will be returned. A process must have view permission on the key for this function to be successful. [akpm@linux-foundation.org: declare keyctl_get_security()] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-by: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Cc: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Cc: Chris Wright <chrisw@sous-sol.org> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: Kevin Coffman <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: allow the callout data to be passed as a blob rather than a stringDavid Howells2008-04-294-29/+48
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Allow the callout data to be passed as a blob rather than a string for internal kernel services that call any request_key_*() interface other than request_key(). request_key() itself still takes a NUL-terminated string. The functions that change are: request_key_with_auxdata() request_key_async() request_key_async_with_auxdata() Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Cc: Chris Wright <chrisw@sous-sol.org> Cc: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: Kevin Coffman <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: check starting keyring as part of searchKevin Coffman2008-04-291-4/+31
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Check the starting keyring as part of the search to (a) see if that is what we're searching for, and (b) to check it is still valid for searching. The scenario: User in process A does things that cause things to be created in its process session keyring. The user then does an su to another user and starts a new process, B. The two processes now share the same process session keyring. Process B does an NFS access which results in an upcall to gssd. When gssd attempts to instantiate the context key (to be linked into the process session keyring), it is denied access even though it has an authorization key. The order of calls is: keyctl_instantiate_key() lookup_user_key() (the default: case) search_process_keyrings(current) search_process_keyrings(rka->context) (recursive call) keyring_search_aux() keyring_search_aux() verifies the keys and keyrings underneath the top-level keyring it is given, but that top-level keyring is neither fully validated nor checked to see if it is the thing being searched for. This patch changes keyring_search_aux() to: 1) do more validation on the top keyring it is given and 2) check whether that top-level keyring is the thing being searched for Signed-off-by: Kevin Coffman <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Cc: Chris Wright <chrisw@sous-sol.org> Cc: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: Kevin Coffman <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Cc: Trond Myklebust <trond.myklebust@fys.uio.no> Cc: "J. Bruce Fields" <bfields@fieldses.org> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* keys: increase the payload size when instantiating a keyDavid Howells2008-04-291-8/+30
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Increase the size of a payload that can be used to instantiate a key in add_key() and keyctl_instantiate_key(). This permits huge CIFS SPNEGO blobs to be passed around. The limit is raised to 1MB. If kmalloc() can't allocate a buffer of sufficient size, vmalloc() will be tried instead. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Cc: Paul Moore <paul.moore@hp.com> Cc: Chris Wright <chrisw@sous-sol.org> Cc: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: Kevin Coffman <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Cc: Steven French <sfrench@us.ibm.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* security: replace remaining __FUNCTION__ occurrencesHarvey Harrison2008-04-181-4/+4
| | | | | | | | | | __FUNCTION__ is gcc-specific, use __func__ Signed-off-by: Harvey Harrison <harvey.harrison@gmail.com> Cc: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Cc: Stephen Smalley <sds@tycho.nsa.gov> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* Convert ERR_PTR(PTR_ERR(p)) instances to ERR_CAST(p)David Howells2008-02-074-4/+4
| | | | | | | | | | Convert instances of ERR_PTR(PTR_ERR(p)) to ERR_CAST(p) using: perl -spi -e 's/ERR_PTR[(]PTR_ERR[(](.*)[)][)]/ERR_CAST(\1)/' `grep -rl 'ERR_PTR[(]*PTR_ERR' fs crypto net security` Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* security/selinux: constify function pointer tables and fieldsJan Engelhardt2008-01-251-2/+2
| | | | | | | Constify function pointer tables and fields. Signed-off-by: Jan Engelhardt <jengelh@computergmbh.de> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org>
* KEYS: Make request_key() and co fundamentally asynchronousDavid Howells2007-10-175-317/+335
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Make request_key() and co fundamentally asynchronous to make it easier for NFS to make use of them. There are now accessor functions that do asynchronous constructions, a wait function to wait for construction to complete, and a completion function for the key type to indicate completion of construction. Note that the construction queue is now gone. Instead, keys under construction are linked in to the appropriate keyring in advance, and that anyone encountering one must wait for it to be complete before they can use it. This is done automatically for userspace. The following auxiliary changes are also made: (1) Key type implementation stuff is split from linux/key.h into linux/key-type.h. (2) AF_RXRPC provides a way to allocate null rxrpc-type keys so that AFS does not need to call key_instantiate_and_link() directly. (3) Adjust the debugging macros so that they're -Wformat checked even if they are disabled, and make it so they can be enabled simply by defining __KDEBUG to be consistent with other code of mine. (3) Documentation. [alan@lxorguk.ukuu.org.uk: keys: missing word in documentation] Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Alan Cox <alan@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* mm: Remove slab destructors from kmem_cache_create().Paul Mundt2007-07-201-1/+1
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | Slab destructors were no longer supported after Christoph's c59def9f222d44bb7e2f0a559f2906191a0862d7 change. They've been BUGs for both slab and slub, and slob never supported them either. This rips out support for the dtor pointer from kmem_cache_create() completely and fixes up every single callsite in the kernel (there were about 224, not including the slab allocator definitions themselves, or the documentation references). Signed-off-by: Paul Mundt <lethal@linux-sh.org>
* usermodehelper: Tidy up waitingJeremy Fitzhardinge2007-07-181-1/+2
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Rather than using a tri-state integer for the wait flag in call_usermodehelper_exec, define a proper enum, and use that. I've preserved the integer values so that any callers I've missed should still work OK. Signed-off-by: Jeremy Fitzhardinge <jeremy@xensource.com> Cc: James Bottomley <James.Bottomley@HansenPartnership.com> Cc: Randy Dunlap <randy.dunlap@oracle.com> Cc: Christoph Hellwig <hch@infradead.org> Cc: Andi Kleen <ak@suse.de> Cc: Paul Mackerras <paulus@samba.org> Cc: Johannes Berg <johannes@sipsolutions.net> Cc: Ralf Baechle <ralf@linux-mips.org> Cc: Bjorn Helgaas <bjorn.helgaas@hp.com> Cc: Joel Becker <joel.becker@oracle.com> Cc: Tony Luck <tony.luck@intel.com> Cc: Kay Sievers <kay.sievers@vrfy.org> Cc: Srivatsa Vaddagiri <vatsa@in.ibm.com> Cc: Oleg Nesterov <oleg@tv-sign.ru> Cc: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
* [AF_RXRPC]: Key facility changes for AF_RXRPCDavid Howells2007-04-261-0/+2
| | | | | | | | | | | Export the keyring key type definition and document its availability. Add alternative types into the key's type_data union to make it more useful. Not all users necessarily want to use it as a list_head (AF_RXRPC doesn't, for example), so make it clear that it can be used in other ways. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: David S. Miller <davem@davemloft.net>
* [PATCH] remove many unneeded #includes of sched.hTim Schmielau2007-02-142-2/+0
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | After Al Viro (finally) succeeded in removing the sched.h #include in module.h recently, it makes sense again to remove other superfluous sched.h includes. There are quite a lot of files which include it but don't actually need anything defined in there. Presumably these includes were once needed for macros that used to live in sched.h, but moved to other header files in the course of cleaning it up. To ease the pain, this time I did not fiddle with any header files and only removed #includes from .c-files, which tend to cause less trouble. Compile tested against 2.6.20-rc2 and 2.6.20-rc2-mm2 (with offsets) on alpha, arm, i386, ia64, mips, powerpc, and x86_64 with allnoconfig, defconfig, allmodconfig, and allyesconfig as well as a few randconfigs on x86_64 and all configs in arch/arm/configs on arm. I also checked that no new warnings were introduced by the patch (actually, some warnings are removed that were emitted by unnecessarily included header files). Signed-off-by: Tim Schmielau <tim@physik3.uni-rostock.de> Acked-by: Russell King <rmk+kernel@arm.linux.org.uk> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* [PATCH] mark struct file_operations const 9Arjan van de Ven2007-02-121-2/+2
| | | | | | | | | | | Many struct file_operations in the kernel can be "const". Marking them const moves these to the .rodata section, which avoids false sharing with potential dirty data. In addition it'll catch accidental writes at compile time to these shared resources. Signed-off-by: Arjan van de Ven <arjan@linux.intel.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@linux-foundation.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* [PATCH] Keys: Fix key serial number collision handlingDavid Howells2007-02-061-19/+14
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Fix the key serial number collision avoidance code in key_alloc_serial(). This didn't use to be so much of a problem as the key serial numbers were allocated from a simple incremental counter, and it would have to go through two billion keys before it could possibly encounter a collision. However, now that random numbers are used instead, collisions are much more likely. This is fixed by finding a hole in the rbtree where the next unused serial number ought to be and using that by going almost back to the top of the insertion routine and redoing the insertion with the new serial number rather than trying to be clever and attempting to work out the insertion point pointer directly. This fixes kernel BZ #7727. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@linux-foundation.org>
* [PATCH] lockdep: name some old style locksPeter Zijlstra2006-12-071-1/+1
| | | | | | | | | Name some of the remaning 'old_style_spin_init' locks Signed-off-by: Peter Zijlstra <a.p.zijlstra@chello.nl> Acked-by: Ingo Molnar <mingo@elte.hu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] security/keys/*: user kmemdup()Eric Sesterhenn2006-12-072-6/+2
| | | | | | | | Signed-off-by: Eric Sesterhenn <snakebyte@gmx.de> Signed-off-by: Alexey Dobriyan <adobriyan@gmail.com> Acked-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] slab: remove kmem_cache_tChristoph Lameter2006-12-071-1/+1
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Replace all uses of kmem_cache_t with struct kmem_cache. The patch was generated using the following script: #!/bin/sh # # Replace one string by another in all the kernel sources. # set -e for file in `find * -name "*.c" -o -name "*.h"|xargs grep -l $1`; do quilt add $file sed -e "1,\$s/$1/$2/g" $file >/tmp/$$ mv /tmp/$$ $file quilt refresh done The script was run like this sh replace kmem_cache_t "struct kmem_cache" Signed-off-by: Christoph Lameter <clameter@sgi.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] slab: remove SLAB_KERNELChristoph Lameter2006-12-071-1/+1
| | | | | | | | SLAB_KERNEL is an alias of GFP_KERNEL. Signed-off-by: Christoph Lameter <clameter@sgi.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* WorkStruct: Pass the work_struct pointer instead of context dataDavid Howells2006-11-221-3/+3
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Pass the work_struct pointer to the work function rather than context data. The work function can use container_of() to work out the data. For the cases where the container of the work_struct may go away the moment the pending bit is cleared, it is made possible to defer the release of the structure by deferring the clearing of the pending bit. To make this work, an extra flag is introduced into the management side of the work_struct. This governs auto-release of the structure upon execution. Ordinarily, the work queue executor would release the work_struct for further scheduling or deallocation by clearing the pending bit prior to jumping to the work function. This means that, unless the driver makes some guarantee itself that the work_struct won't go away, the work function may not access anything else in the work_struct or its container lest they be deallocated.. This is a problem if the auxiliary data is taken away (as done by the last patch). However, if the pending bit is *not* cleared before jumping to the work function, then the work function *may* access the work_struct and its container with no problems. But then the work function must itself release the work_struct by calling work_release(). In most cases, automatic release is fine, so this is the default. Special initiators exist for the non-auto-release case (ending in _NAR). Signed-Off-By: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com>
* [PATCH] Keys: Allow in-kernel key requestor to pass auxiliary data to upcallerDavid Howells2006-06-293-11/+36
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | The proposed NFS key type uses its own method of passing key requests to userspace (upcalling) rather than invoking /sbin/request-key. This is because the responsible userspace daemon should already be running and will be contacted through rpc_pipefs. This patch permits the NFS filesystem to pass auxiliary data to the upcall operation (struct key_type::request_key) so that the upcaller can use a pre-existing communications channel more easily. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Acked-By: Kevin Coffman <kwc@citi.umich.edu> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] poison: add & use more constantsRandy Dunlap2006-06-271-1/+2
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Add more poison values to include/linux/poison.h. It's not clear to me whether some others should be added or not, so I haven't added any of these: ./include/linux/libata.h:#define ATA_TAG_POISON 0xfafbfcfdU ./arch/ppc/8260_io/fcc_enet.c:1918: memset((char *)(&(immap->im_dprambase[(mem_addr+64)])), 0x88, 32); ./drivers/usb/mon/mon_text.c:429: memset(mem, 0xe5, sizeof(struct mon_event_text)); ./drivers/char/ftape/lowlevel/ftape-ctl.c:738: memset(ft_buffer[i]->address, 0xAA, FT_BUFF_SIZE); ./drivers/block/sx8.c:/* 0xf is just arbitrary, non-zero noise; this is sorta like poisoning */ Signed-off-by: Randy Dunlap <rdunlap@xenotime.net> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] keys: restrict contents of /proc/keys to Viewable keysMichael LeMay2006-06-261-0/+7
| | | | | | | | | | | | | Restrict /proc/keys such that only those keys to which the current task is granted View permission are presented. The documentation is also updated to reflect these changes. Signed-off-by: Michael LeMay <mdlemay@epoch.ncsc.mil> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] keys: allocate key serial numbers randomlyMichael LeMay2006-06-261-14/+14
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Cause key_alloc_serial() to generate key serial numbers randomly rather than in linear sequence. Using an linear sequence permits a covert communication channel to be established, in which one process can communicate with another by creating or not creating new keys within a certain timeframe. The second process can probe for the expected next key serial number and judge its existence by the error returned. This is a problem as the serial number namespace is globally shared between all tasks, regardless of their context. For more information on this topic, this old TCSEC guide is recommended: http://www.radium.ncsc.mil/tpep/library/rainbow/NCSC-TG-030.html Signed-off-by: Michael LeMay <mdlemay@epoch.ncsc.mil> Signed-off-by: James Morris <jmorris@namei.org> Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] keys: let keyctl_chown() change a key's ownerFredrik Tolf2006-06-261-8/+48
| | | | | | | | | Let keyctl_chown() change a key's owner, including attempting to transfer the quota burden to the new user. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>
* [PATCH] keys: discard the contents of a key on revocationDavid Howells2006-06-262-1/+45
| | | | | | | | | | | | Cause the keys linked to a keyring to be unlinked from it when revoked and it causes the data attached to a user-defined key to be discarded when revoked. This frees up most of the quota a key occupied at that point, rather than waiting for the key to actually be destroyed. Signed-off-by: David Howells <dhowells@redhat.com> Signed-off-by: Andrew Morton <akpm@osdl.org> Signed-off-by: Linus Torvalds <torvalds@osdl.org>